How do you maintain motivation when writing a novel

How do you maintain motivation when writing a novel?

Here are 21 techniques I used to finish my 300 page novel last summer.
Enjoy!

Writing a novel isn’t an easy task.
The average novel is anywhere from 75,000 to 120,000 words long.
That’s a lot of words, to put it lightly, and the words aren’t even all of it.
If you just slam down 100,000 words, it isn’t necessarily a novel, because they could be any old words.
A novel has a plot, characters, a conflict, all expressed through the words.
It’s not going to happen overnight, even if it might seem that way at the beginning.
New writers often burst forward at full throttle for the first 20,000 words or so.
They feel like they’re working magic, weaving a world out of nothing with words and grammar and syntax, and they’re correct.
But eventually that feeling starts to fade.
This is a common phenomenon.
Around the middle of a work-in-progress novel, the writer might start to lose interest.
They’ve gotten through the fun of the beginning, but the exhilaration of the end is still a long way away.
Unfortunately, the middle is the bridge between the beginning and the end.
Without it you’re not going to have a finished novel.
How do we get ourselves through that middle slump? There are a number of ways, and just pushing through it by sheer willpower is one of them.
However, not everyone has that kind of innate willpower.
They might need a little help to muster it up before they can force their way through the middle.
One strategy that works for me is a little something I call the “gold coin” rule.
If there’s absolutely nothing to look forward to writing (or reading) in your novel other than the exciting bits at the beginning and the end, then you have a serious problem and you need to rework your plot to change that.
If there is something in there — an epic battle, the protagonist finally confessing their love for another character, a heartbreaking death — then that’s perfect.
Use that scene to motivate yourself.
If you’re really looking forward to writing it, then you’ll eventually get yourself there.
Another strategy I’ve used is mood music.
To be more specific, mood music is music that suits the mood/tone/atmosphere/setting of your novel.
If you’re writing a high fantasy set in a Viking-eqsue nation, then Norse-style music might be your mood music.
If you’re writing a crime thriller, then film noir music or gritty punk might be your mood music.
Find songs that fit your novel, then build a playlist.
Listening to appropriately atmospheric music can really help bring on some inspiration.
I’ve even gotten ideas for important plot points from lines in songs.
Finally, the most important thing is to love your project.
This is your novel.
It’s your own world, your own story, and you’re bringing it to life.
No one else can do that.
Writing a novel may be a daunting task, but you’re up to the challenge, because it’s your story and your story alone.
Let yourself fall in love with your characters, your setting, your plot, and writing it into reality will get that much easier.
That doesn’t mean that you won’t need to edit, of course — but if it’s a labour of love, it’s a lot more likely to get finished.

The first step is always conceptualizing the entire story in your mind.
Thankfully, I do not write cliched romances, so I focus more on the narration and events (which I call plot points.
)

Once, I have the story, I write a small summary of it usually on my work-table or on a piece of paper.
Now, that I have the story in mind and a backup in case I forget, I start writing it chapter by chapter.
For my first novel, I took around two years as it involved a lot of research.
The motivation then was being a published author and it just kept me going.
Writing was the only thing I was good at and somehow I kept coming back to it naturally.
The second novel, India Shining, was also based on a lot of research.
I was in Delhi for almost six months for the novel.
The travelling and roaming around in Delhi was what made it more interesting.
From the Red Fort, Qutub Minar and the Rajpath, I was searching for interesting facts and stories.
I already knew the joy of holding your own book and that also never allowed me to stop.
For my third novel, I did lose interest in between as I was trying to write a very dark and descriptive thriller.
Reading about darker aspects of religion, and various other myths was disturbing but the fun element was always there.
I guess, I do not lose motivation to finish my books because I am learning a lot of new things in the research phase.
Honestly, the look on a reader's face when they message me back and tell the book didn't let them sleep until they finished it also keeps you going as a writer.

I have been writing romance novels for just over one year and started after retiring from an almost 30 year career in the high-tech industry.
My entire life I have loved to read all types of books, including romance.
When I retired I found an online course titled “How to Write a Romance Novel” and thought it would be entertaining to attend.
The course was not for credit, I did not have to read my works in a classroom since it was online, so I figured I had nothing to lose.
Ten weeks later I was hooked.
I loved creating characters and allowing their stories to unfold in my mind.
I had almost 2/3 of a novel written, the result of completing my class assignments.
At that point I had no intention of publishing, but friends read my work and encouraged me.
I am so glad they did.
I have now published three novels in my Beguiling Bachelor series and I jump out of bed in the mornings anxious to complete the fourth book in the series.
Writing has become my joy and my passion.
Is it hard work? You bet.
Although I never thought about writing novels (well, not since I was nine years old) I can’t imagine not writing now.
I did do two other things before I published a book.
I began keeping a journal, writing every day even if I was not in the mood to write.
This trained me to write daily, an invaluable skill.
Second, I started following the blogs of writers who share their craft, Joanna Penn and Jane Friedman for example, and I took their advice.

I’ve been writing ever since I was a kid, but I didn’t attempt to write a novel until 2008, when I was in my twenties.
One day, my husband suggested I write a book.
I laughed.
A novel? Pshaw.
Ridiculous.
Then I started thinking about it.
A month later, I was determined to do it.
I didn’t tell my husband or anyone else at first.
I wanted to make sure I could do it before I said anything.
I started by plotting out an idea and writing a few scenes.
It was awful, and I knew it.
The idea wasn’t original at all, and the writing needed work.
It was enough to convince me that I could do it, though.
I could write a novel.
I came up with a more original idea and started work on it.
It was a mess—completely chaotic.
I realized that having some neat ideas wasn’t enough.
I needed a coherent plot.
I scrapped that novel and tried again.
The third time was the charm—meaning that I finished the novel this time.
It never sold or landed me an agent, and that’s probably for the best.
It can rest in peace on a flash drive in a drawer; I have no intention of resurrecting it.
But it was a novel, with a logical plot, a main character who grew, and everything else a story needs.
I had written a novel.
I wanted more.
I wanted to be published.
So I started another novel.
Then another.
Then another.
I got into a habit of querying one while I wrote the next one.
My writing skills improved, and eventually it paid off.
I got a book deal.
My second book is coming out in a few months.
I am extremely grateful that one day, my husband suggested I write a book—even if I did laugh at the time.

We all face the writer’s block.
Don’t we? There are days when you just feel the words pouring out and transforming into beautiful sentences on the laptop screen.
And then there are days when you write a paragraph in an hour, only to delete it back.
The thing which works for me is-

I try to figure out what emotion is causing my motivation to flag.
Sometimes I’m letting my self-doubts paralyze me.
In that case, when it’s time to sit down and write, I tell myself I’m not really writing.
I’m just going to sit down and play around with my story and see what happens.
Sometimes it’s because I can’t quite visualize the scene that comes next.
In that case, I skip ahead to a scene that I can clearly see in my head.
Later I can figure out what comes in between.
Sometimes it’s because I’m not feeling a strong enough connection to the story.
In that case, I try to tap into my protagonist’s head.
What would she think of the story so far? What does she need me to do for her? Is there anything that she hasn’t told me yet? For this kind of work, I like to do some free writing by hand and really delve deep.
Sometimes it’s just because my brain is resisting the deep, hard work that writing is.
In that case, I play little games with myself and try to turn the writing into a puzzle.
For example, I pick a specific word count for the scene and try to match it exactly.
Or I randomly pick two or three interesting words and see how I can work them into the scene naturally.
It might end up clunky, but who cares? I’ll be revising it later anyway.
This is just to help myself get a little forward momentum.
Sometimes it’s because I’m feeling discouraged because I can’t seem to make any progress.
In that case, I draw a loading bar and post it next to my desk.
I fill in a little portion after every writing session.
Or I break down a huge project into smaller chunks and work on one section at a time.
Sometimes I just watch Writing: How do you find the motivation to finish a book when you're half way through and want to stop?
Good luck!

I like that you only say “write” rather than write and publish, or even write and finish.
For the sake of argument, I am going to assume the latter is the case though.
The first story I finished an actual first draft of was in 2013, the same year I also attempted my first NaNoWriMo (which ended abruptly, and in disappointment).
It became my love child for a while, and though it had taken me less than a year writing it, I wasn’t done editing it until about two years later, and I sent out a request to my first publishing house (it was rejected, but I’ve since sent it to more of them).
As to why? I cannot but quote George Orwell:
“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness.
One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand”
I don’t know why I write.
I have stories to tell, imaginaries to convey using the written word.
I have towns to describe, creatures to live, adventures to be ventured, and events to transpire.
I love writing, it grants me solace and joy, tears and laughter.
It can be a struggle.
An obsession.
A chore.
But it needs to be done, and doing it is a wonderful, terrible thing.
I hope this helps.

Just work whether or not you feel like it.
Inspiration and good feelings are nice, but a novel is mostly the result of a lot of hard work.
Determine how much time you have every day to work (be realistic) and stick to your schedule.
If you need to take one or two days off a week for chores, relaxation, etc.
, then by all means do it so you can keep up your stamina.
If your reticence is actually caused by fear of not doing a good job, etc.
, I can recommend a very good book which helped me overcome immense fear and writing blocks.
It is called Mastering Creative Anxiety by Eric Maisel, PhD.
You can buy a copy on Amazon.
All the best!

When writing a novel, especially when you have been writing it for a long time, it may be difficult to stay motivated.
For me, one of the best ways to stay motivated is to work on your novel very often, nearly everyday if possible.
The reason for this is that if you continue writing frequently, then you will stay connected to the story and the characters.
If you do not write often enough, then you may become sort of disconnected from the story-line, and this may cause you to lose motivation.
Also, tell other people about your novel every once in a while.
For me, when I talk to other people about my novel, it not only helps them motivate me, but it also reinvigorates my own interest in my novel.
Sometimes, if I find myself losing interest or motivation, I start to write out lengthy descriptions of each of the characters in my book.
This helps me to better understand my own characters and feel more connected to not only them, but also the whole novel.
I hope this helps you.
Stay motivated and don't stop writing.
:)

In the early stages, the motivation is easy, right? You get an idea and then furiously write out your idea and expand it, and add plot ideas and twists, and establish some fun and interesting characters.

Once you get those initial ideas down, ah yes, that's when the motivation wanes.
My current novel hit that wall in January.
Most of the fun creation was done, and now came the dreaded bit on fleshing it out, writing the scenes and dialogue and joining all the bits together.
Ugh.
.
.
.
moan, groan, etc.

So here's what I did.
I reached out to my readers and posted a message that the next book would be coming out in "late 2016".
I put some pressure on myself – a deadline! I've committed to my readers that they'll have the next book before the year is out.
Sine posting that promise, I've written just shy of 20,000 words.
A tight time frame does wonders for my motivation.

Of course, that may work for me, but it won't work for everyone.
There is that very famous quote by the late, great Douglas Adams where he says "I love deadlines.
I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.
"
The other thing I do is carry a notebook with me everywhere.
If I think of a funny line or an interesting scene, I write it down.
Those random thoughts often turn into several chapters' worth of good bits.
(Some end up being saved for the next novel after this one.
)
Read good books, get inspired, look at art, do activities that move you emotionally.
When you're all full of emotion and inspiration, the words will flow.
Stay away from the TV if you can.
.
it's a motivation-killer.

What was it that made you want to write in the first place? What was it that you loved or enjoyed about it? Chances are if you’re finding it boring thatbwhat you’re writing is boring and your audience will find it that too.
Find the joy and follow it.
Other recommendations are setting up
a routine and sticking to it just like when you’re getting into exercise.
The body likes routine.

I may be misinterpreting your reluctance to finish, but if you are like me, it is not that you do not want to write, but you do not want to finish.
Finishing might mean that you are missing a possible improvement or two, that you could make the novel better.
If that is your reason for not finishing, perhaps what I do will help you.
I tend to be a starter, not a finisher, so the way I motivate myself to finish one project is to tell myself that as soon as I finish this one, I get the reward of being able to start the next one.
It works well for me, as you can see from the dozens of books I have finished, both fiction and non-fiction.
Perhaps it will work well for you.
When you are working on a novel, generically "writing everyday" can almost serve as more of a distraction than actual productive activity.
For instance, when I started my current work in progress, I made a promise that I would write every day.
And I have.
But after I got stalled on my novel, my writing turned into just practice – using writing prompts from popular blogs and journaling on how frustrating it can be to be writer.
While that kept up my promise, it wasn't working on my novel.
Then, after trying for years, I finally got some freelance work writing for different organizations.
Now I write everyday for work, which makes writing for fun tiresome.
So I would say, write everyday, but make sure you schedule at least thirty minutes or so of work on your current novel.
Even if it's just stream-of-consciousness and you end up throwing it out eventually, every word you put down is progress.
And don't throw anything away until you are in your first editing stage, and even then, keep all of it around.
That paragraph or scene might not have worked where it was originally, but could be moved somewhere else and be more poignant.
The important thing to remember is that this is your current work – the one you want to put out into the world, the one you want to finish – and in order to do that you're going to have to work on it.

I have been writing romance novels for just over one year and started after retiring from an almost 30 year career in the high-tech industry.
My entire life I have loved to read all types of books, including romance.
When I retired I found an online course titled “How to Write a Romance Novel” and thought it would be entertaining to attend.
The course was not for credit, I did not have to read my works in a classroom since it was online, so I figured I had nothing to lose.
Ten weeks later I was hooked.
I loved creating characters and allowing their stories to unfold in my mind.
I had almost 2/3 of a novel written, the result of completing my class assignments.
At that point I had no intention of publishing, but friends read my work and encouraged me.
I am so glad they did.
I have now published three novels in my Beguiling Bachelor series and I jump out of bed in the mornings anxious to complete the fourth book in the series.
Writing has become my joy and my passion.
Is it hard work? You bet.
Although I never thought about writing novels (well, not since I was nine years old) I can’t imagine not writing now.
I did do two other things before I published a book.
I began keeping a journal, writing every day even if I was not in the mood to write.
This trained me to write daily, an invaluable skill.
Second, I started following the blogs of writers who share their craft, Joanna Penn and Jane Friedman for example, and I took their advice.

I’ve been writing ever since I was a kid, but I didn’t attempt to write a novel until 2008, when I was in my twenties.
One day, my husband suggested I write a book.
I laughed.
A novel? Pshaw.
Ridiculous.
Then I started thinking about it.
A month later, I was determined to do it.
I didn’t tell my husband or anyone else at first.
I wanted to make sure I could do it before I said anything.
I started by plotting out an idea and writing a few scenes.
It was awful, and I knew it.
The idea wasn’t original at all, and the writing needed work.
It was enough to convince me that I could do it, though.
I could write a novel.
I came up with a more original idea and started work on it.
It was a mess—completely chaotic.
I realized that having some neat ideas wasn’t enough.
I needed a coherent plot.
I scrapped that novel and tried again.
The third time was the charm—meaning that I finished the novel this time.
It never sold or landed me an agent, and that’s probably for the best.
It can rest in peace on a flash drive in a drawer; I have no intention of resurrecting it.
But it was a novel, with a logical plot, a main character who grew, and everything else a story needs.
I had written a novel.
I wanted more.
I wanted to be published.
So I started another novel.
Then another.
Then another.
I got into a habit of querying one while I wrote the next one.
My writing skills improved, and eventually it paid off.
I got a book deal.
My second book is coming out in a few months.
I am extremely grateful that one day, my husband suggested I write a book—even if I did laugh at the time.

We all face the writer’s block.
Don’t we? There are days when you just feel the words pouring out and transforming into beautiful sentences on the laptop screen.
And then there are days when you write a paragraph in an hour, only to delete it back.
The thing which works for me is-

I try to figure out what emotion is causing my motivation to flag.
Sometimes I’m letting my self-doubts paralyze me.
In that case, when it’s time to sit down and write, I tell myself I’m not really writing.
I’m just going to sit down and play around with my story and see what happens.
Sometimes it’s because I can’t quite visualize the scene that comes next.
In that case, I skip ahead to a scene that I can clearly see in my head.
Later I can figure out what comes in between.
Sometimes it’s because I’m not feeling a strong enough connection to the story.
In that case, I try to tap into my protagonist’s head.
What would she think of the story so far? What does she need me to do for her? Is there anything that she hasn’t told me yet? For this kind of work, I like to do some free writing by hand and really delve deep.
Sometimes it’s just because my brain is resisting the deep, hard work that writing is.
In that case, I play little games with myself and try to turn the writing into a puzzle.
For example, I pick a specific word count for the scene and try to match it exactly.
Or I randomly pick two or three interesting words and see how I can work them into the scene naturally.
It might end up clunky, but who cares? I’ll be revising it later anyway.
This is just to help myself get a little forward momentum.
Sometimes it’s because I’m feeling discouraged because I can’t seem to make any progress.
In that case, I draw a loading bar and post it next to my desk.
I fill in a little portion after every writing session.
Or I break down a huge project into smaller chunks and work on one section at a time.
Sometimes I just watch
Writing: How do you find the motivation to finish a book when you're half way through and want to stop?
Good luck!

I like that you only say “write” rather than write and publish, or even write and finish.
For the sake of argument, I am going to assume the latter is the case though.
The first story I finished an actual first draft of was in 2013, the same year I also attempted my first NaNoWriMo (which ended abruptly, and in disappointment).
It became my love child for a while, and though it had taken me less than a year writing it, I wasn’t done editing it until about two years later, and I sent out a request to my first publishing house (it was rejected, but I’ve since sent it to more of them).
As to why? I cannot but quote George Orwell:
“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness.
One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand”
I don’t know why I write.
I have stories to tell, imaginaries to convey using the written word.
I have towns to describe, creatures to live, adventures to be ventured, and events to transpire.
I love writing, it grants me solace and joy, tears and laughter.
It can be a struggle.
An obsession.
A chore.
But it needs to be done, and doing it is a wonderful, terrible thing.
I hope this helps.

Just work whether or not you feel like it.
Inspiration and good feelings are nice, but a novel is mostly the result of a lot of hard work.
Determine how much time you have every day to work (be realistic) and stick to your schedule.
If you need to take one or two days off a week for chores, relaxation, etc.
, then by all means do it so you can keep up your stamina.
If your reticence is actually caused by fear of not doing a good job, etc.
, I can recommend a very good book which helped me overcome immense fear and writing blocks.
It is called Mastering Creative Anxiety by Eric Maisel, PhD.
You can buy a copy on Amazon.
All the best!

When writing a novel, especially when you have been writing it for a long time, it may be difficult to stay motivated.
For me, one of the best ways to stay motivated is to work on your novel very often, nearly everyday if possible.
The reason for this is that if you continue writing frequently, then you will stay connected to the story and the characters.
If you do not write often enough, then you may become sort of disconnected from the story-line, and this may cause you to lose motivation.
Also, tell other people about your novel every once in a while.
For me, when I talk to other people about my novel, it not only helps them motivate me, but it also reinvigorates my own interest in my novel.
Sometimes, if I find myself losing interest or motivation, I start to write out lengthy descriptions of each of the characters in my book.
This helps me to better understand my own characters and feel more connected to not only them, but also the whole novel.
I hope this helps you.
Stay motivated and don't stop writing.
:)

In the early stages, the motivation is easy, right? You get an idea and then furiously write out your idea and expand it, and add plot ideas and twists, and establish some fun and interesting characters.

Once you get those initial ideas down, ah yes, that's when the motivation wanes.
My current novel hit that wall in January.
Most of the fun creation was done, and now came the dreaded bit on fleshing it out, writing the scenes and dialogue and joining all the bits together.
Ugh.
.
.
.
moan, groan, etc.

So here's what I did.
I reached out to my readers and posted a message that the next book would be coming out in "late 2016".
I put some pressure on myself – a deadline! I've committed to my readers that they'll have the next book before the year is out.
Sine posting that promise, I've written just shy of 20,000 words.
A tight time frame does wonders for my motivation.

Of course, that may work for me, but it won't work for everyone.
There is that very famous quote by the late, great Douglas Adams where he says "I love deadlines.
I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.
"
The other thing I do is carry a notebook with me everywhere.
If I think of a funny line or an interesting scene, I write it down.
Those random thoughts often turn into several chapters' worth of good bits.
(Some end up being saved for the next novel after this one.
)
Read good books, get inspired, look at art, do activities that move you emotionally.
When you're all full of emotion and inspiration, the words will flow.
Stay away from the TV if you can.
.
it's a motivation-killer.

What was it that made you want to write in the first place? What was it that you loved or enjoyed about it? Chances are if you’re finding it boring thatbwhat you’re writing is boring and your audience will find it that too.
Find the joy and follow it.
Other recommendations are setting up
a routine and sticking to it just like when you’re getting into exercise.
The body likes routine.

I may be misinterpreting your reluctance to finish, but if you are like me, it is not that you do not want to write, but you do not want to finish.
Finishing might mean that you are missing a possible improvement or two, that you could make the novel better.
If that is your reason for not finishing, perhaps what I do will help you.
I tend to be a starter, not a finisher, so the way I motivate myself to finish one project is to tell myself that as soon as I finish this one, I get the reward of being able to start the next one.
It works well for me, as you can see from the dozens of books I have finished, both fiction and non-fiction.
Perhaps it will work well for you.
When you are working on a novel, generically "writing everyday" can almost serve as more of a distraction than actual productive activity.
For instance, when I started my current work in progress, I made a promise that I would write every day.
And I have.
But after I got stalled on my novel, my writing turned into just practice – using writing prompts from popular blogs and journaling on how frustrating it can be to be writer.
While that kept up my promise, it wasn't working on my novel.
Then, after trying for years, I finally got some freelance work writing for different organizations.
Now I write everyday for work, which makes writing for fun tiresome.
So I would say, write everyday, but make sure you schedule at least thirty minutes or so of work on your current novel.
Even if it's just stream-of-consciousness and you end up throwing it out eventually, every word you put down is progress.
And don't throw anything away until you are in your first editing stage, and even then, keep all of it around.
That paragraph or scene might not have worked where it was originally, but could be moved somewhere else and be more poignant.
The important thing to remember is that this is your current work – the one you want to put out into the world, the one you want to finish – and in order to do that you're going to have to work on it.

I have been writing romance novels for just over one year and started after retiring from an almost 30 year career in the high-tech industry.
My entire life I have loved to read all types of books, including romance.
When I retired I found an online course titled “How to Write a Romance Novel” and thought it would be entertaining to attend.
The course was not for credit, I did not have to read my works in a classroom since it was online, so I figured I had nothing to lose.
Ten weeks later I was hooked.
I loved creating characters and allowing their stories to unfold in my mind.
I had almost 2/3 of a novel written, the result of completing my class assignments.
At that point I had no intention of publishing, but friends read my work and encouraged me.
I am so glad they did.
I have now published three novels in my Beguiling Bachelor series and I jump out of bed in the mornings anxious to complete the fourth book in the series.
Writing has become my joy and my passion.
Is it hard work? You bet.
Although I never thought about writing novels (well, not since I was nine years old) I can’t imagine not writing now.
I did do two other things before I published a book.
I began keeping a journal, writing every day even if I was not in the mood to write.
This trained me to write daily, an invaluable skill.
Second, I started following the blogs of writers who share their craft, Joanna Penn and Jane Friedman for example, and I took their advice.

I’ve been writing ever since I was a kid, but I didn’t attempt to write a novel until 2008, when I was in my twenties.
One day, my husband suggested I write a book.
I laughed.
A novel? Pshaw.
Ridiculous.
Then I started thinking about it.
A month later, I was determined to do it.
I didn’t tell my husband or anyone else at first.
I wanted to make sure I could do it before I said anything.
I started by plotting out an idea and writing a few scenes.
It was awful, and I knew it.
The idea wasn’t original at all, and the writing needed work.
It was enough to convince me that I could do it, though.
I could write a novel.
I came up with a more original idea and started work on it.
It was a mess—completely chaotic.
I realized that having some neat ideas wasn’t enough.
I needed a coherent plot.
I scrapped that novel and tried again.
The third time was the charm—meaning that I finished the novel this time.
It never sold or landed me an agent, and that’s probably for the best.
It can rest in peace on a flash drive in a drawer; I have no intention of resurrecting it.
But it was a novel, with a logical plot, a main character who grew, and everything else a story needs.
I had written a novel.
I wanted more.
I wanted to be published.
So I started another novel.
Then another.
Then another.
I got into a habit of querying one while I wrote the next one.
My writing skills improved, and eventually it paid off.
I got a book deal.
My second book is coming out in a few months.
I am extremely grateful that one day, my husband suggested I write a book—even if I did laugh at the time.

We all face the writer’s block.
Don’t we? There are days when you just feel the words pouring out and transforming into beautiful sentences on the laptop screen.
And then there are days when you write a paragraph in an hour, only to delete it back.
The thing which works for me is-

I try to figure out what emotion is causing my motivation to flag.
Sometimes I’m letting my self-doubts paralyze me.
In that case, when it’s time to sit down and write, I tell myself I’m not really writing.
I’m just going to sit down and play around with my story and see what happens.
Sometimes it’s because I can’t quite visualize the scene that comes next.
In that case, I skip ahead to a scene that I can clearly see in my head.
Later I can figure out what comes in between.
Sometimes it’s because I’m not feeling a strong enough connection to the story.
In that case, I try to tap into my protagonist’s head.
What would she think of the story so far? What does she need me to do for her? Is there anything that she hasn’t told me yet? For this kind of work, I like to do some free writing by hand and really delve deep.
Sometimes it’s just because my brain is resisting the deep, hard work that writing is.
In that case, I play little games with myself and try to turn the writing into a puzzle.
For example, I pick a specific word count for the scene and try to match it exactly.
Or I randomly pick two or three interesting words and see how I can work them into the scene naturally.
It might end up clunky, but who cares? I’ll be revising it later anyway.
This is just to help myself get a little forward momentum.
Sometimes it’s because I’m feeling discouraged because I can’t seem to make any progress.
In that case, I draw a loading bar and post it next to my desk.
I fill in a little portion after every writing session.
Or I break down a huge project into smaller chunks and work on one section at a time.
Sometimes I just watch
Writing: How do you find the motivation to finish a book when you're half way through and want to stop?
Good luck!

I like that you only say “write” rather than write and publish, or even write and finish.
For the sake of argument, I am going to assume the latter is the case though.
The first story I finished an actual first draft of was in 2013, the same year I also attempted my first NaNoWriMo (which ended abruptly, and in disappointment).
It became my love child for a while, and though it had taken me less than a year writing it, I wasn’t done editing it until about two years later, and I sent out a request to my first publishing house (it was rejected, but I’ve since sent it to more of them).
As to why? I cannot but quote George Orwell:
“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness.
One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand”
I don’t know why I write.
I have stories to tell, imaginaries to convey using the written word.
I have towns to describe, creatures to live, adventures to be ventured, and events to transpire.
I love writing, it grants me solace and joy, tears and laughter.
It can be a struggle.
An obsession.
A chore.
But it needs to be done, and doing it is a wonderful, terrible thing.
I hope this helps.

Just work whether or not you feel like it.
Inspiration and good feelings are nice, but a novel is mostly the result of a lot of hard work.
Determine how much time you have every day to work (be realistic) and stick to your schedule.
If you need to take one or two days off a week for chores, relaxation, etc.
, then by all means do it so you can keep up your stamina.
If your reticence is actually caused by fear of not doing a good job, etc.
, I can recommend a very good book which helped me overcome immense fear and writing blocks.
It is called Mastering Creative Anxiety by Eric Maisel, PhD.
You can buy a copy on Amazon.
All the best!

When writing a novel, especially when you have been writing it for a long time, it may be difficult to stay motivated.
For me, one of the best ways to stay motivated is to work on your novel very often, nearly everyday if possible.
The reason for this is that if you continue writing frequently, then you will stay connected to the story and the characters.
If you do not write often enough, then you may become sort of disconnected from the story-line, and this may cause you to lose motivation.
Also, tell other people about your novel every once in a while.
For me, when I talk to other people about my novel, it not only helps them motivate me, but it also reinvigorates my own interest in my novel.
Sometimes, if I find myself losing interest or motivation, I start to write out lengthy descriptions of each of the characters in my book.
This helps me to better understand my own characters and feel more connected to not only them, but also the whole novel.
I hope this helps you.
Stay motivated and don't stop writing.
:)

In the early stages, the motivation is easy, right? You get an idea and then furiously write out your idea and expand it, and add plot ideas and twists, and establish some fun and interesting characters.

Once you get those initial ideas down, ah yes, that's when the motivation wanes.
My current novel hit that wall in January.
Most of the fun creation was done, and now came the dreaded bit on fleshing it out, writing the scenes and dialogue and joining all the bits together.
Ugh.
.
.
.
moan, groan, etc.

So here's what I did.
I reached out to my readers and posted a message that the next book would be coming out in "late 2016".
I put some pressure on myself – a deadline! I've committed to my readers that they'll have the next book before the year is out.
Sine posting that promise, I've written just shy of 20,000 words.
A tight time frame does wonders for my motivation.

Of course, that may work for me, but it won't work for everyone.
There is that very famous quote by the late, great Douglas Adams where he says "I love deadlines.
I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.
"
The other thing I do is carry a notebook with me everywhere.
If I think of a funny line or an interesting scene, I write it down.
Those random thoughts often turn into several chapters' worth of good bits.
(Some end up being saved for the next novel after this one.
)
Read good books, get inspired, look at art, do activities that move you emotionally.
When you're all full of emotion and inspiration, the words will flow.
Stay away from the TV if you can.
.
it's a motivation-killer.

I had, for a while, gone to the trap and skeet range twice a week, a drive of a bit over 30 miles on surface streets.
I had plenty of time to let my mind roam.
At some point, I thought of how neat it would be to have a family that did certain things for me.
Since I had plenty of drive time, I began to fill in the gaps.
How would such a family function, what related things would it do, what else would it have to do to accomplish the first things I’d thought of and so on.
How old would such a family likely be?
So here I was with this marvelous idea for a family, the Family, and it kind of percolated in my brain for a while.
For years, my partner had been saying ‘You should write a book.
’ One day those two things came together, and I came up with an idea for a mystery wrapped around my Family idea.
Gee, I thought, you can make money with a novel.
Why not?
Oh, that worked so well.
I got something like five pages into it and hit a brick wall.
Kept staring at the computer screen for several days.
Finally, one morning over coffee, she said, ‘instead of taking it this way, why don’t you take the story that way?’ That did it; the story poured out and the first draft was done in four weeks.
Better than 120K words.
It was crap.
A friend – who, incidentally, has not offered to read anything of mine since – read it and gave me some honest feedback.
Back to the drawing board, so to speak.
Massive rewrite.
Being an inveterate tinkerer with my own writing, I kept self-editing and rewriting as I queried every agent I could find who represented works in the genre.
I was utterly convinced that I had a bestseller on my hands and all I needed was to get it in front of the right agent; everything would fall into place from there.
By the time two-and-a-half years had passed, I’d given up on agents and was working my way down the list of independent presses.
Finally I got occasional rejections that didn’t just say ‘Thanks but no thanks; don’t call us and we won’t call you,’ but instead said, ‘I’m not going to take this, and here’s why:’ and they’d give me a good idea of my shortcomings.
Contrary to some of my relatives’ opinions, I’m not a complete idiot.
I recognized invaluable help when it’s dropped in my lap.
I rewrote accordingly.
Finally after three years, I had a publisher say ‘We’d like to publish your novel.

Now for the fictional idea that there’s money in them thar hills.
For some, sure.
But if you can’t put a huge amount of time and effort into marketing and building up your fan base, ‘out there’ is where it’s going to stay.
If you’re trying to write a novel, don’t give up your day job.
Don’t give up your second job.
Is it rewarding? Absolutely.
But don’t go into it expecting to be the next best-selling author.
Go into it expecting to make a couple of bucks here and there while satisfying that itch to write that will develop.

What was it that made you want to write in the first place? What was it that you loved or enjoyed about it? Chances are if you’re finding it boring thatbwhat you’re writing is boring and your audience will find it that too.
Find the joy and follow it.
Other recommendations are setting up
a routine and sticking to it just like when you’re getting into exercise.
The body likes routine.

I may be misinterpreting your reluctance to finish, but if you are like me, it is not that you do not want to write, but you do not want to finish.
Finishing might mean that you are missing a possible improvement or two, that you could make the novel better.
If that is your reason for not finishing, perhaps what I do will help you.
I tend to be a starter, not a finisher, so the way I motivate myself to finish one project is to tell myself that as soon as I finish this one, I get the reward of being able to start the next one.
It works well for me, as you can see from the dozens of books I have finished, both fiction and non-fiction.
Perhaps it will work well for you.
When you are working on a novel, generically "writing everyday" can almost serve as more of a distraction than actual productive activity.
For instance, when I started my current work in progress, I made a promise that I would write every day.
And I have.
But after I got stalled on my novel, my writing turned into just practice – using writing prompts from popular blogs and journaling on how frustrating it can be to be writer.
While that kept up my promise, it wasn't working on my novel.
Then, after trying for years, I finally got some freelance work writing for different organizations.
Now I write everyday for work, which makes writing for fun tiresome.
So I would say, write everyday, but make sure you schedule at least thirty minutes or so of work on your current novel.
Even if it's just stream-of-consciousness and you end up throwing it out eventually, every word you put down is progress.
And don't throw anything away until you are in your first editing stage, and even then, keep all of it around.
That paragraph or scene might not have worked where it was originally, but could be moved somewhere else and be more poignant.
The important thing to remember is that this is your current work – the one you want to put out into the world, the one you want to finish – and in order to do that you're going to have to work on it.

I have been writing romance novels for just over one year and started after retiring from an almost 30 year career in the high-tech industry.
My entire life I have loved to read all types of books, including romance.
When I retired I found an online course titled “How to Write a Romance Novel” and thought it would be entertaining to attend.
The course was not for credit, I did not have to read my works in a classroom since it was online, so I figured I had nothing to lose.
Ten weeks later I was hooked.
I loved creating characters and allowing their stories to unfold in my mind.
I had almost 2/3 of a novel written, the result of completing my class assignments.
At that point I had no intention of publishing, but friends read my work and encouraged me.
I am so glad they did.
I have now published three novels in my Beguiling Bachelor series and I jump out of bed in the mornings anxious to complete the fourth book in the series.
Writing has become my joy and my passion.
Is it hard work? You bet.
Although I never thought about writing novels (well, not since I was nine years old) I can’t imagine not writing now.
I did do two other things before I published a book.
I began keeping a journal, writing every day even if I was not in the mood to write.
This trained me to write daily, an invaluable skill.
Second, I started following the blogs of writers who share their craft, Joanna Penn and Jane Friedman for example, and I took their advice.

I’ve been writing ever since I was a kid, but I didn’t attempt to write a novel until 2008, when I was in my twenties.
One day, my husband suggested I write a book.
I laughed.
A novel? Pshaw.
Ridiculous.
Then I started thinking about it.
A month later, I was determined to do it.
I didn’t tell my husband or anyone else at first.
I wanted to make sure I could do it before I said anything.
I started by plotting out an idea and writing a few scenes.
It was awful, and I knew it.
The idea wasn’t original at all, and the writing needed work.
It was enough to convince me that I could do it, though.
I could write a novel.
I came up with a more original idea and started work on it.
It was a mess—completely chaotic.
I realized that having some neat ideas wasn’t enough.
I needed a coherent plot.
I scrapped that novel and tried again.
The third time was the charm—meaning that I finished the novel this time.
It never sold or landed me an agent, and that’s probably for the best.
It can rest in peace on a flash drive in a drawer; I have no intention of resurrecting it.
But it was a novel, with a logical plot, a main character who grew, and everything else a story needs.
I had written a novel.
I wanted more.
I wanted to be published.
So I started another novel.
Then another.
Then another.
I got into a habit of querying one while I wrote the next one.
My writing skills improved, and eventually it paid off.
I got a book deal.
My second book is coming out in a few months.
I am extremely grateful that one day, my husband suggested I write a book—even if I did laugh at the time.

We all face the writer’s block.
Don’t we? There are days when you just feel the words pouring out and transforming into beautiful sentences on the laptop screen.
And then there are days when you write a paragraph in an hour, only to delete it back.
The thing which works for me is-

I try to figure out what emotion is causing my motivation to flag.
Sometimes I’m letting my self-doubts paralyze me.
In that case, when it’s time to sit down and write, I tell myself I’m not really writing.
I’m just going to sit down and play around with my story and see what happens.
Sometimes it’s because I can’t quite visualize the scene that comes next.
In that case, I skip ahead to a scene that I can clearly see in my head.
Later I can figure out what comes in between.
Sometimes it’s because I’m not feeling a strong enough connection to the story.
In that case, I try to tap into my protagonist’s head.
What would she think of the story so far? What does she need me to do for her? Is there anything that she hasn’t told me yet? For this kind of work, I like to do some free writing by hand and really delve deep.
Sometimes it’s just because my brain is resisting the deep, hard work that writing is.
In that case, I play little games with myself and try to turn the writing into a puzzle.
For example, I pick a specific word count for the scene and try to match it exactly.
Or I randomly pick two or three interesting words and see how I can work them into the scene naturally.
It might end up clunky, but who cares? I’ll be revising it later anyway.
This is just to help myself get a little forward momentum.
Sometimes it’s because I’m feeling discouraged because I can’t seem to make any progress.
In that case, I draw a loading bar and post it next to my desk.
I fill in a little portion after every writing session.
Or I break down a huge project into smaller chunks and work on one section at a time.
Sometimes I just watch
Writing: How do you find the motivation to finish a book when you're half way through and want to stop?
Good luck!

I like that you only say “write” rather than write and publish, or even write and finish.
For the sake of argument, I am going to assume the latter is the case though.
The first story I finished an actual first draft of was in 2013, the same year I also attempted my first NaNoWriMo (which ended abruptly, and in disappointment).
It became my love child for a while, and though it had taken me less than a year writing it, I wasn’t done editing it until about two years later, and I sent out a request to my first publishing house (it was rejected, but I’ve since sent it to more of them).
As to why? I cannot but quote George Orwell:
“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness.
One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand”
I don’t know why I write.
I have stories to tell, imaginaries to convey using the written word.
I have towns to describe, creatures to live, adventures to be ventured, and events to transpire.
I love writing, it grants me solace and joy, tears and laughter.
It can be a struggle.
An obsession.
A chore.
But it needs to be done, and doing it is a wonderful, terrible thing.
I hope this helps.

Just work whether or not you feel like it.
Inspiration and good feelings are nice, but a novel is mostly the result of a lot of hard work.
Determine how much time you have every day to work (be realistic) and stick to your schedule.
If you need to take one or two days off a week for chores, relaxation, etc.
, then by all means do it so you can keep up your stamina.
If your reticence is actually caused by fear of not doing a good job, etc.
, I can recommend a very good book which helped me overcome immense fear and writing blocks.
It is called Mastering Creative Anxiety by Eric Maisel, PhD.
You can buy a copy on Amazon.
All the best!

When writing a novel, especially when you have been writing it for a long time, it may be difficult to stay motivated.
For me, one of the best ways to stay motivated is to work on your novel very often, nearly everyday if possible.
The reason for this is that if you continue writing frequently, then you will stay connected to the story and the characters.
If you do not write often enough, then you may become sort of disconnected from the story-line, and this may cause you to lose motivation.
Also, tell other people about your novel every once in a while.
For me, when I talk to other people about my novel, it not only helps them motivate me, but it also reinvigorates my own interest in my novel.
Sometimes, if I find myself losing interest or motivation, I start to write out lengthy descriptions of each of the characters in my book.
This helps me to better understand my own characters and feel more connected to not only them, but also the whole novel.
I hope this helps you.
Stay motivated and don't stop writing.
:)

In the early stages, the motivation is easy, right? You get an idea and then furiously write out your idea and expand it, and add plot ideas and twists, and establish some fun and interesting characters.

Once you get those initial ideas down, ah yes, that's when the motivation wanes.
My current novel hit that wall in January.
Most of the fun creation was done, and now came the dreaded bit on fleshing it out, writing the scenes and dialogue and joining all the bits together.
Ugh.
.
.
.
moan, groan, etc.

So here's what I did.
I reached out to my readers and posted a message that the next book would be coming out in "late 2016".
I put some pressure on myself – a deadline! I've committed to my readers that they'll have the next book before the year is out.
Sine posting that promise, I've written just shy of 20,000 words.
A tight time frame does wonders for my motivation.

Of course, that may work for me, but it won't work for everyone.
There is that very famous quote by the late, great Douglas Adams where he says "I love deadlines.
I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.
"
The other thing I do is carry a notebook with me everywhere.
If I think of a funny line or an interesting scene, I write it down.
Those random thoughts often turn into several chapters' worth of good bits.
(Some end up being saved for the next novel after this one.
)
Read good books, get inspired, look at art, do activities that move you emotionally.
When you're all full of emotion and inspiration, the words will flow.
Stay away from the TV if you can.
.
it's a motivation-killer.

I had, for a while, gone to the trap and skeet range twice a week, a drive of a bit over 30 miles on surface streets.
I had plenty of time to let my mind roam.
At some point, I thought of how neat it would be to have a family that did certain things for me.
Since I had plenty of drive time, I began to fill in the gaps.
How would such a family function, what related things would it do, what else would it have to do to accomplish the first things I’d thought of and so on.
How old would such a family likely be?
So here I was with this marvelous idea for a family, the Family, and it kind of percolated in my brain for a while.
For years, my partner had been saying ‘You should write a book.
’ One day those two things came together, and I came up with an idea for a mystery wrapped around my Family idea.
Gee, I thought, you can make money with a novel.
Why not?
Oh, that worked so well.
I got something like five pages into it and hit a brick wall.
Kept staring at the computer screen for several days.
Finally, one morning over coffee, she said, ‘instead of taking it this way, why don’t you take the story that way?’ That did it; the story poured out and the first draft was done in four weeks.
Better than 120K words.
It was crap.
A friend – who, incidentally, has not offered to read anything of mine since – read it and gave me some honest feedback.
Back to the drawing board, so to speak.
Massive rewrite.
Being an inveterate tinkerer with my own writing, I kept self-editing and rewriting as I queried every agent I could find who represented works in the genre.
I was utterly convinced that I had a bestseller on my hands and all I needed was to get it in front of the right agent; everything would fall into place from there.
By the time two-and-a-half years had passed, I’d given up on agents and was working my way down the list of independent presses.
Finally I got occasional rejections that didn’t just say ‘Thanks but no thanks; don’t call us and we won’t call you,’ but instead said, ‘I’m not going to take this, and here’s why:’ and they’d give me a good idea of my shortcomings.
Contrary to some of my relatives’ opinions, I’m not a complete idiot.
I recognized invaluable help when it’s dropped in my lap.
I rewrote accordingly.
Finally after three years, I had a publisher say ‘We’d like to publish your novel.

Now for the fictional idea that there’s money in them thar hills.
For some, sure.
But if you can’t put a huge amount of time and effort into marketing and building up your fan base, ‘out there’ is where it’s going to stay.
If you’re trying to write a novel, don’t give up your day job.
Don’t give up your second job.
Is it rewarding? Absolutely.
But don’t go into it expecting to be the next best-selling author.
Go into it expecting to make a couple of bucks here and there while satisfying that itch to write that will develop.

What was it that made you want to write in the first place? What was it that you loved or enjoyed about it? Chances are if you’re finding it boring thatbwhat you’re writing is boring and your audience will find it that too.
Find the joy and follow it.
Other recommendations are setting up
a routine and sticking to it just like when you’re getting into exercise.
The body likes routine.

I may be misinterpreting your reluctance to finish, but if you are like me, it is not that you do not want to write, but you do not want to finish.
Finishing might mean that you are missing a possible improvement or two, that you could make the novel better.
If that is your reason for not finishing, perhaps what I do will help you.
I tend to be a starter, not a finisher, so the way I motivate myself to finish one project is to tell myself that as soon as I finish this one, I get the reward of being able to start the next one.
It works well for me, as you can see from the dozens of books I have finished, both fiction and non-fiction.
Perhaps it will work well for you.
When you are working on a novel, generically "writing everyday" can almost serve as more of a distraction than actual productive activity.
For instance, when I started my current work in progress, I made a promise that I would write every day.
And I have.
But after I got stalled on my novel, my writing turned into just practice – using writing prompts from popular blogs and journaling on how frustrating it can be to be writer.
While that kept up my promise, it wasn't working on my novel.
Then, after trying for years, I finally got some freelance work writing for different organizations.
Now I write everyday for work, which makes writing for fun tiresome.
So I would say, write everyday, but make sure you schedule at least thirty minutes or so of work on your current novel.
Even if it's just stream-of-consciousness and you end up throwing it out eventually, every word you put down is progress.
And don't throw anything away until you are in your first editing stage, and even then, keep all of it around.
That paragraph or scene might not have worked where it was originally, but could be moved somewhere else and be more poignant.
The important thing to remember is that this is your current work – the one you want to put out into the world, the one you want to finish – and in order to do that you're going to have to work on it.

I like that you only say “write” rather than write and publish, or even write and finish.
For the sake of argument, I am going to assume the latter is the case though.
The first story I finished an actual first draft of was in 2013, the same year I also attempted my first NaNoWriMo (which ended abruptly, and in disappointment).
It became my love child for a while, and though it had taken me less than a year writing it, I wasn’t done editing it until about two years later, and I sent out a request to my first publishing house (it was rejected, but I’ve since sent it to more of them).
As to why? I cannot but quote George Orwell:
“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness.
One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand”
I don’t know why I write.
I have stories to tell, imaginaries to convey using the written word.
I have towns to describe, creatures to live, adventures to be ventured, and events to transpire.
I love writing, it grants me solace and joy, tears and laughter.
It can be a struggle.
An obsession.
A chore.
But it needs to be done, and doing it is a wonderful, terrible thing.
I hope this helps.

Just work whether or not you feel like it.
Inspiration and good feelings are nice, but a novel is mostly the result of a lot of hard work.
Determine how much time you have every day to work (be realistic) and stick to your schedule.
If you need to take one or two days off a week for chores, relaxation, etc.
, then by all means do it so you can keep up your stamina.
If your reticence is actually caused by fear of not doing a good job, etc.
, I can recommend a very good book which helped me overcome immense fear and writing blocks.
It is called Mastering Creative Anxiety by Eric Maisel, PhD.
You can buy a copy on Amazon.
All the best!

When writing a novel, especially when you have been writing it for a long time, it may be difficult to stay motivated.
For me, one of the best ways to stay motivated is to work on your novel very often, nearly everyday if possible.
The reason for this is that if you continue writing frequently, then you will stay connected to the story and the characters.
If you do not write often enough, then you may become sort of disconnected from the story-line, and this may cause you to lose motivation.
Also, tell other people about your novel every once in a while.
For me, when I talk to other people about my novel, it not only helps them motivate me, but it also reinvigorates my own interest in my novel.
Sometimes, if I find myself losing interest or motivation, I start to write out lengthy descriptions of each of the characters in my book.
This helps me to better understand my own characters and feel more connected to not only them, but also the whole novel.
I hope this helps you.
Stay motivated and don't stop writing.
:)

In the early stages, the motivation is easy, right? You get an idea and then furiously write out your idea and expand it, and add plot ideas and twists, and establish some fun and interesting characters.

Once you get those initial ideas down, ah yes, that's when the motivation wanes.
My current novel hit that wall in January.
Most of the fun creation was done, and now came the dreaded bit on fleshing it out, writing the scenes and dialogue and joining all the bits together.
Ugh.
.
.
.
moan, groan, etc.

So here's what I did.
I reached out to my readers and posted a message that the next book would be coming out in "late 2016".
I put some pressure on myself – a deadline! I've committed to my readers that they'll have the next book before the year is out.
Sine posting that promise, I've written just shy of 20,000 words.
A tight time frame does wonders for my motivation.

Of course, that may work for me, but it won't work for everyone.
There is that very famous quote by the late, great Douglas Adams where he says "I love deadlines.
I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.
"
The other thing I do is carry a notebook with me everywhere.
If I think of a funny line or an interesting scene, I write it down.
Those random thoughts often turn into several chapters' worth of good bits.
(Some end up being saved for the next novel after this one.
)
Read good books, get inspired, look at art, do activities that move you emotionally.
When you're all full of emotion and inspiration, the words will flow.
Stay away from the TV if you can.
.
it's a motivation-killer.

For me, I get in the mood to write by writing.
It’s easier than I make it sound (I hope).
I’m in the process of writing a story myself, and what I do is I take a scenario that I want to happen (this scenario is very basic at first: who are the characters, what are they doing, why are they doing it/why is the scenario happening, when does this happen in relation to my other scenarios, how the characters suceed/fail/other).
I go through a basic answer, but if I can change anything, I change it and put it in a different version and just work down the line, making more and more versions until I find one that makes sense, isn’t completely stereotypical or expected, and appeals to me, the people who I’m pestering to read it, while allowing the story to continue.
Once I pick a “final” version of a scenario, I ALWAYS keep the old ones.
That way, if I ever get writer’s block, I re-visit those old trails and finish them with different endings than the one I picked.
I don’t write the segments in order, if I have an idea, I drop what I’m doing to write it down for later, as it could evolve.
I use an online program caled “Google Drive”, and I use Google Docs in particular.
It’s easier than erasing and re writing everything.
My advice: don’t be afraid of loose ends, everything will come together!

I had, for a while, gone to the trap and skeet range twice a week, a drive of a bit over 30 miles on surface streets.
I had plenty of time to let my mind roam.
At some point, I thought of how neat it would be to have a family that did certain things for me.
Since I had plenty of drive time, I began to fill in the gaps.
How would such a family function, what related things would it do, what else would it have to do to accomplish the first things I’d thought of and so on.
How old would such a family likely be?
So here I was with this marvelous idea for a family, the Family, and it kind of percolated in my brain for a while.
For years, my partner had been saying ‘You should write a book.
’ One day those two things came together, and I came up with an idea for a mystery wrapped around my Family idea.
Gee, I thought, you can make money with a novel.
Why not?
Oh, that worked so well.
I got something like five pages into it and hit a brick wall.
Kept staring at the computer screen for several days.
Finally, one morning over coffee, she said, ‘instead of taking it this way, why don’t you take the story that way?’ That did it; the story poured out and the first draft was done in four weeks.
Better than 120K words.
It was crap.
A friend – who, incidentally, has not offered to read anything of mine since – read it and gave me some honest feedback.
Back to the drawing board, so to speak.
Massive rewrite.
Being an inveterate tinkerer with my own writing, I kept self-editing and rewriting as I queried every agent I could find who represented works in the genre.
I was utterly convinced that I had a bestseller on my hands and all I needed was to get it in front of the right agent; everything would fall into place from there.
By the time two-and-a-half years had passed, I’d given up on agents and was working my way down the list of independent presses.
Finally I got occasional rejections that didn’t just say ‘Thanks but no thanks; don’t call us and we won’t call you,’ but instead said, ‘I’m not going to take this, and here’s why:’ and they’d give me a good idea of my shortcomings.
Contrary to some of my relatives’ opinions, I’m not a complete idiot.
I recognized invaluable help when it’s dropped in my lap.
I rewrote accordingly.
Finally after three years, I had a publisher say ‘We’d like to publish your novel.

Now for the fictional idea that there’s money in them thar hills.
For some, sure.
But if you can’t put a huge amount of time and effort into marketing and building up your fan base, ‘out there’ is where it’s going to stay.
If you’re trying to write a novel, don’t give up your day job.
Don’t give up your second job.
Is it rewarding? Absolutely.
But don’t go into it expecting to be the next best-selling author.
Go into it expecting to make a couple of bucks here and there while satisfying that itch to write that will develop.

Great answers here from others.
I, too, can struggle to finish and it depends on various factors.
Do you know where you want to go with the story, but just can't seem to sit down to do it? Or are you not sure what comes next?
If it’s the former, it may be worth deciding what’s keeping you from finishing.
If it’s because you know where it’s going and it feels “been there, done that,” I would encourage to dive in anyway.
You will have surprises along the way!
If you aren’t sure what’s next so you’re stalled, perhaps taking time to plan out the rest of the book might be helpful.
There are a lot of resources online for outlining/plotting a novel.
I used to be against them until I tried it and found it incredibly helpful to keep me on track while still allowing for changes and surprises.
I provided my own strategies in response to a similar question on Quora.
And you’ll see some other great advice too:
Writing: How do you find the motivation to finish a book when you're half way through and want to stop?
Good luck!

Motivation is very important while writing a book.
From my personal experience I have seen it was very easy to keep myself motivated and focused on my first book titled “Aphrodite” but after I got it published, I lost motivation to write the second book.
There are some factors that work towards keeping up the motivation.
Some of them are discussed below:
Footnotes
Mosiur Rehman, Publisher, Did you lose your writing motivation

  • Did you lose your writing motivation
  • How could we maintain peace if the worlds population reduced into half overnight
  • How do I find the motivation to write
  • How do I start writing scripts What are the processes involved in script writing
  • Has writing answers on Quora improved your writing skills
  • Has writing answers on Quora improved your writing skills
  • How do I start writing poetry and writing stuff
  • How can I write better more realistic male characters
  • How can I focus on writing one book when I think about writing another book
  • How can you describe writing a story when writing a story
  • How do I write a fantasy novel without good and evil clich
  • Are you writing a novel Whats it about
  • Do great writers like their writing
  • Has your own writing ever made you cry
  • Have you ever surprised yourself when writing something What was it
  • Are you writing a novel Whats it about
  • Do great writers like their writing
  • Has your own writing ever made you cry
  • Have you ever surprised yourself when writing something What was it
  • How can I avoid clichs in my writing
  • How can I write a good novel for beginners
  • How did you start writing your first novel
  • How do I become better at descriptive writing
  • How do I finish writing my book
  • How do I get in the habit of writing every day
  • How do I get started on writing my novel
  • How do I start writing a novel and publish it
  • How do you avoid clichs when writing
  • How do you keep writing
  • Which writing tools do writers use while writing a novel
  • Can copying composition improve English writing skills
  • Can reading improve my writing skills
  • Can you imitate the writing of the person who A2Ad you
  • Does writing very personal deep things make you sad
  • Has Quora removed the option of writing answers anonymously
  • Have anybody received personal help by writing to PM Modi
  • Can copying composition improve English writing skills
  • Can reading improve my writing skills
  • Can you imitate the writing of the person who A2Ad you
  • Does writing very personal deep things make you sad
  • Has Quora removed the option of writing answers anonymously
  • Have anybody received personal help by writing to PM Modi
  • How can I improve my English speaking reading and writing
  • How can I improve my English writing skills
  • How can I start writing a story book
  • How can I stop using the word then when writing a story
  • How did your writing change someones life
  • How do I improve my writing skills in a short period of time
  • How do I start the habit of writing a Diary
  • How do I start writing a book on philosophy
  • How do I start writing a script for a short film
  • How do I start writing blogs poetry
  • How do you begin writing a script for a short film
  • How do you make a novel interesting
  • As a female writer how can I correctly portray a male character and what are some common mistakes that are made when writing male characters
  • Do you think James Frey did anything really wrong in writing the book A Million Little Pieces I did not see what Oprah did to him My sister in laws friend knew him and said that he was as bad as in the book
  • As a female writer how can I correctly portray a male character and what are some common mistakes that are made when writing male characters
  • Do you think James Frey did anything really wrong in writing the book A Million Little Pieces I did not see what Oprah did to him My sister in laws friend knew him and said that he was as bad as in the book
  • How do I start off a novel
  • Apart from speaking and reading books how do I improve my speaking and writing skills in English Is there a website available where someone could correct me How long would it take to master these skills
  • Apart from speaking and reading books how do I improve my speaking and writing skills in English Is there a website available where someone could correct me How long would it take to master these skills
  • How can I stay motivated to write a web serial
  • How can I write short stories in UrduRekhta
  • How can we write a novel
  • How do I write a love story
  • How do you feel beautiful
  • Can I have the first book in my trilogy told from the viewpoint of character A the second told from character Bs viewpoint and the third told from both as long as it helps the plot Or would that be too confusing for the readers
  • How do you start writing poetry
  • What are some tips for writing a novel
  • What is the best writing advice you have received
  • What keeps you from writing
  • What one tip changed your writing forever
  • What should a writer keep in mind while writing a novel
  • Can people have bad handwriting when writing JapaneseKoreanChinese handwritingArabic etc
  • Can you imitate the writing of the person who A2Ad you
  • How can I improve my English writing skills
  • How do you tackle the task of writing male characters
  • How profitable would writing a philosophy book be
  • What are common writing mistakes to avoid
  • What are some best and special points to remember before writing fantasy novel
  • What are some mistakes straight writers make when writing gay romance
  • What are some tips for writing good answers on Quora
  • What are the benefits of writing in a journal or diary
  • What are the best software tools for writing books
  • What are the most common clichs in fiction writing
  • What are the most common grammar mistakes that new writers make when they are writing a novel
  • What can the person that A2Ad you do to improve their writing
  • What common mistakes do writers make when writing a first person narrative
  • What is the worst advice about writing a book that youve received
  • What is the worst advice youve received for your writing career
  • What mistakes do new writers often make in their writing
  • What should a female writer keep in mind when writing a male character
  • What should a male writer keep in mind when writing a female character
  • What should a teenager keep in mind when writing a malefemale character
  • What should a writer keep in mind when writing about a LGBT character
  • Whats the best writing advice you had to learn for yourself
  • Whats the best writing prompt you have ever received
  • When writing a book what makes a character a Mary Sue and how can you prevent this from happening
  • Which authors writing style do you find the most unique and identifiable Why