How do I write something interesting

How do I write something interesting?

As writers, we all want to draw readers in by writing and creating interesting stories.
We want them to "ooh" and "ahh" on how amazing our stories are.

Like this
बहुत मुस्कुराते हैं वो, जब भी उदास है होते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
दिल में तमन्ना किसी ओर की रखते हैं,
किसी ओर को हैं गले लगाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
जेब भरी होती है सिक्कों से
मदद की गुहार को मगर खाली हाथ हैं दिखाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
हाथ मिलाते हैं हमसे वो बड़ी मोहब्बत से
आस्तीन में अपनी मगर खंजर छुपाए .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
करते हैं इबादत उस खुदा की
उसी के बंदों को फिर है मार गिराते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.

Write what pleases or displeases you.
Write what makes you feel.
Write what makes you fall in love.
Write what shatters you inside.
Write what fixes you.
Write what rips you apart.
Write what makes your cry.
Write what makes you laugh.
Write what you would want to read.
Write what you would want to know.
Write because it pleases you.
Write for yourself, rather than an audience.
When you write for yourself, you are most honest.
You know all the details, you cannot cheat yourself.
When you write for an audience, you lose focus.

Interest is relative.
Just start by writing… something.
Someone is bound to find it interesting.
If you’re looking to write something that LOTS of people find interesting, I think the best way to start would be to look at what people are currently interested in reading.
Riding the current interest-wave has worked for lots of writers in the past.
If you are looking to write some thing that LOTS of people find interesting AND is unique… well.
That’s a right-place-at-the-right-time sort of scenario (I’m thinking about how Terry Brooks describes in his book “Sometimes the Magic Works”, when he had his Shannara series picked up by Lester Del Rey, who wanted to make a point, and used Brooks to do so).

How do I write something interesting?

You know that a question like this will get an answer that strays into subjective territory — not because of what ‘interesting’ means but what things we think we could do to increase the interestingness.
That is hard to say in my view.
The first thing in writing anything interesting must be you have to be able to identify (and relate to) the topic or thing you want to write about.
I don’t think I could write more than 12 words on hip-hop music because I couldn’t relate to anywhere within its most generic boundaries.
So that’s the first overriding requirement in the game, I think.
Then I think you have to start asking yourself two questions:—
Technique-wise, there are tons of online resources on writing tips for different kinds of writing, so I need not go into this department.
If you want to appeal to the widest range of people, start by checking out what’s trending in your topic area.
Join the bandwagon of trends for that kind of wide appeal.
I might be talking out of my backside, but that seems to be the common advice I see all over the place.
The following are from my experience and those I work with:—
If you want to keep the reader stay interested, then you’ll have to write in a way that people can relate.
Interesting in most cases is relatability.
If people cannot find anything to relate to in your writing, the interest evaporates or just didn’t get a chance to develop.
For your writing to be relatable, you have to write it in a way that can be understood intuitively.
If it can be understood intimately too by strangers, so much the better.
For something that’s understandable intuitively, you have to remain in the world of reality with your presentation, even if the topic is surrealistic.
Science fiction is a good example of this.
If you want to be ‘fresh,’ new or innovative, then you have to present the topic with some creative flair.
You’re trying to be novel.
That means careful structuring of the material.
That also means careful aesthetic choices to differentiate your control of the subject matter vs.
the kind of control shown by other writers of the same topic.
This kind of treatment is good for memoirs — which should avoid uniform structures like chronological trajectories, conflicts and solutions, causes and consequences, and explanations for them.
Your job is to force things into the foreground — into prominence — that people could relate to, something they could reuse as their ‘experience.

The ground rules for ‘interestingness’ are quite straightforward:—
People are not clever, but they’re not stupid and they do know how to divide and know what an 80–20 split means in real life.
Thanks for the A2A.

There are as many answers as there are topics and audiences.
It really depends on what you’re writing about and who you’re writing for.
One thing I’ve found consistently useful in writing is to create a question in the reader’s mind, tease them along a bit, then answer it.
It doesn’t have to be a formal mystery.
You just have to draw out the mystery innate in the topic.
For example, instead of giving just the facts, you open up a question as to why something happened or would something work.
Then you present the info the reader needs to decide.
Finally you give them the official answer.
By the time they get to the answer, they really care, because they want to know if they were right.

As writers, we all want to draw readers in by writing and creating interesting stories.
We want them to "ooh" and "ahh" on how amazing our stories are.

Like this
बहुत मुस्कुराते हैं वो, जब भी उदास है होते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
दिल में तमन्ना किसी ओर की रखते हैं,
किसी ओर को हैं गले लगाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
जेब भरी होती है सिक्कों से
मदद की गुहार को मगर खाली हाथ हैं दिखाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
हाथ मिलाते हैं हमसे वो बड़ी मोहब्बत से
आस्तीन में अपनी मगर खंजर छुपाए .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
करते हैं इबादत उस खुदा की
उसी के बंदों को फिर है मार गिराते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.

Write what pleases or displeases you.
Write what makes you feel.
Write what makes you fall in love.
Write what shatters you inside.
Write what fixes you.
Write what rips you apart.
Write what makes your cry.
Write what makes you laugh.
Write what you would want to read.
Write what you would want to know.
Write because it pleases you.
Write for yourself, rather than an audience.
When you write for yourself, you are most honest.
You know all the details, you cannot cheat yourself.
When you write for an audience, you lose focus.

Interest is relative.
Just start by writing… something.
Someone is bound to find it interesting.
If you’re looking to write something that LOTS of people find interesting, I think the best way to start would be to look at what people are currently interested in reading.
Riding the current interest-wave has worked for lots of writers in the past.
If you are looking to write some thing that LOTS of people find interesting AND is unique… well.
That’s a right-place-at-the-right-time sort of scenario (I’m thinking about how Terry Brooks describes in his book “Sometimes the Magic Works”, when he had his Shannara series picked up by Lester Del Rey, who wanted to make a point, and used Brooks to do so).

How do I write something interesting?

You know that a question like this will get an answer that strays into subjective territory — not because of what ‘interesting’ means but what things we think we could do to increase the interestingness.
That is hard to say in my view.
The first thing in writing anything interesting must be you have to be able to identify (and relate to) the topic or thing you want to write about.
I don’t think I could write more than 12 words on hip-hop music because I couldn’t relate to anywhere within its most generic boundaries.
So that’s the first overriding requirement in the game, I think.
Then I think you have to start asking yourself two questions:—
Technique-wise, there are tons of online resources on writing tips for different kinds of writing, so I need not go into this department.
If you want to appeal to the widest range of people, start by checking out what’s trending in your topic area.
Join the bandwagon of trends for that kind of wide appeal.
I might be talking out of my backside, but that seems to be the common advice I see all over the place.
The following are from my experience and those I work with:—
If you want to keep the reader stay interested, then you’ll have to write in a way that people can relate.
Interesting in most cases is relatability.
If people cannot find anything to relate to in your writing, the interest evaporates or just didn’t get a chance to develop.
For your writing to be relatable, you have to write it in a way that can be understood intuitively.
If it can be understood intimately too by strangers, so much the better.
For something that’s understandable intuitively, you have to remain in the world of reality with your presentation, even if the topic is surrealistic.
Science fiction is a good example of this.
If you want to be ‘fresh,’ new or innovative, then you have to present the topic with some creative flair.
You’re trying to be novel.
That means careful structuring of the material.
That also means careful aesthetic choices to differentiate your control of the subject matter vs.
the kind of control shown by other writers of the same topic.
This kind of treatment is good for memoirs — which should avoid uniform structures like chronological trajectories, conflicts and solutions, causes and consequences, and explanations for them.
Your job is to force things into the foreground — into prominence — that people could relate to, something they could reuse as their ‘experience.

The ground rules for ‘interestingness’ are quite straightforward:—
People are not clever, but they’re not stupid and they do know how to divide and know what an 80–20 split means in real life.
Thanks for the A2A.

There are as many answers as there are topics and audiences.
It really depends on what you’re writing about and who you’re writing for.
One thing I’ve found consistently useful in writing is to create a question in the reader’s mind, tease them along a bit, then answer it.
It doesn’t have to be a formal mystery.
You just have to draw out the mystery innate in the topic.
For example, instead of giving just the facts, you open up a question as to why something happened or would something work.
Then you present the info the reader needs to decide.
Finally you give them the official answer.
By the time they get to the answer, they really care, because they want to know if they were right.

Like this
बहुत मुस्कुराते हैं वो, जब भी उदास है होते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
दिल में तमन्ना किसी ओर की रखते हैं,
किसी ओर को हैं गले लगाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
जेब भरी होती है सिक्कों से
मदद की गुहार को मगर खाली हाथ हैं दिखाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
हाथ मिलाते हैं हमसे वो बड़ी मोहब्बत से
आस्तीन में अपनी मगर खंजर छुपाए .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
करते हैं इबादत उस खुदा की
उसी के बंदों को फिर है मार गिराते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.

As writers, we all want to draw readers in by writing and creating interesting stories.
We want them to "ooh" and "ahh" on how amazing our stories are.

Write what pleases or displeases you.
Write what makes you feel.
Write what makes you fall in love.
Write what shatters you inside.
Write what fixes you.
Write what rips you apart.
Write what makes your cry.
Write what makes you laugh.
Write what you would want to read.
Write what you would want to know.
Write because it pleases you.
Write for yourself, rather than an audience.
When you write for yourself, you are most honest.
You know all the details, you cannot cheat yourself.
When you write for an audience, you lose focus.

Interest is relative.
Just start by writing… something.
Someone is bound to find it interesting.
If you’re looking to write something that LOTS of people find interesting, I think the best way to start would be to look at what people are currently interested in reading.
Riding the current interest-wave has worked for lots of writers in the past.
If you are looking to write some thing that LOTS of people find interesting AND is unique… well.
That’s a right-place-at-the-right-time sort of scenario (I’m thinking about how Terry Brooks describes in his book “Sometimes the Magic Works”, when he had his Shannara series picked up by Lester Del Rey, who wanted to make a point, and used Brooks to do so).

How do I write something interesting?

You know that a question like this will get an answer that strays into subjective territory — not because of what ‘interesting’ means but what things we think we could do to increase the interestingness.
That is hard to say in my view.
The first thing in writing anything interesting must be you have to be able to identify (and relate to) the topic or thing you want to write about.
I don’t think I could write more than 12 words on hip-hop music because I couldn’t relate to anywhere within its most generic boundaries.
So that’s the first overriding requirement in the game, I think.
Then I think you have to start asking yourself two questions:—
Technique-wise, there are tons of online resources on writing tips for different kinds of writing, so I need not go into this department.
If you want to appeal to the widest range of people, start by checking out what’s trending in your topic area.
Join the bandwagon of trends for that kind of wide appeal.
I might be talking out of my backside, but that seems to be the common advice I see all over the place.
The following are from my experience and those I work with:—
If you want to keep the reader stay interested, then you’ll have to write in a way that people can relate.
Interesting in most cases is relatability.
If people cannot find anything to relate to in your writing, the interest evaporates or just didn’t get a chance to develop.
For your writing to be relatable, you have to write it in a way that can be understood intuitively.
If it can be understood intimately too by strangers, so much the better.
For something that’s understandable intuitively, you have to remain in the world of reality with your presentation, even if the topic is surrealistic.
Science fiction is a good example of this.
If you want to be ‘fresh,’ new or innovative, then you have to present the topic with some creative flair.
You’re trying to be novel.
That means careful structuring of the material.
That also means careful aesthetic choices to differentiate your control of the subject matter vs.
the kind of control shown by other writers of the same topic.
This kind of treatment is good for memoirs — which should avoid uniform structures like chronological trajectories, conflicts and solutions, causes and consequences, and explanations for them.
Your job is to force things into the foreground — into prominence — that people could relate to, something they could reuse as their ‘experience.

The ground rules for ‘interestingness’ are quite straightforward:—
People are not clever, but they’re not stupid and they do know how to divide and know what an 80–20 split means in real life.
Thanks for the A2A.

There are as many answers as there are topics and audiences.
It really depends on what you’re writing about and who you’re writing for.
One thing I’ve found consistently useful in writing is to create a question in the reader’s mind, tease them along a bit, then answer it.
It doesn’t have to be a formal mystery.
You just have to draw out the mystery innate in the topic.
For example, instead of giving just the facts, you open up a question as to why something happened or would something work.
Then you present the info the reader needs to decide.
Finally you give them the official answer.
By the time they get to the answer, they really care, because they want to know if they were right.

Like this
बहुत मुस्कुराते हैं वो, जब भी उदास है होते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
दिल में तमन्ना किसी ओर की रखते हैं,
किसी ओर को हैं गले लगाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
जेब भरी होती है सिक्कों से
मदद की गुहार को मगर खाली हाथ हैं दिखाते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
हाथ मिलाते हैं हमसे वो बड़ी मोहब्बत से
आस्तीन में अपनी मगर खंजर छुपाए .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.
करते हैं इबादत उस खुदा की
उसी के बंदों को फिर है मार गिराते .
.
.
झूठ सिर्फ अल्फ़ाज़ से नहीं बोले जाते.

As writers, we all want to draw readers in by writing and creating interesting stories.
We want them to "ooh" and "ahh" on how amazing our stories are.

Write what pleases or displeases you.
Write what makes you feel.
Write what makes you fall in love.
Write what shatters you inside.
Write what fixes you.
Write what rips you apart.
Write what makes your cry.
Write what makes you laugh.
Write what you would want to read.
Write what you would want to know.
Write because it pleases you.
Write for yourself, rather than an audience.
When you write for yourself, you are most honest.
You know all the details, you cannot cheat yourself.
When you write for an audience, you lose focus.

Updated: 28.06.2019 — 2:51 pm

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