How do I get acquainted and make friends with native English speakers

How do I get acquainted and make friends with native English speakers?

There are some great answers here, but I'm going to add a little cautionary two cents.
I'm an American foreigner living in China.
I have tons of Chinese friends.
Why are they my friends? Because we genuinely like each other and enjoy spending time together.
I have never ever become friends with someone who said, “Can we make (be) friends so you can help me improve my English?!” I absolutely HATE this question.
Not because I don't like Chinese people, but because I dislike the idea of someone USING me just to learn English.
Teaching English is my job.
How would you feel if I found out you were a cook and I said “"Oh! Can we make friends so that you can come to my house and cook me breakfast?” For me, maybe not all foreigners, it feels like being taken advantage of.
Become friends with foreigners for a variety of reasons, but the first should always be that you actually LIKE that person.
Being friends with native speakers is a great way to improve your English, but using foreigners to improve your English is a great way to be a shitty friend.
That being said, almost every moderate sized city has several “foreign hangouts”.
These are generally cafes/chill bars.
Universities usually have foreign students.
Clubs are a place to meet people but you can't really have a good conversation there.
I can only speak for myself, but I've had western friend express the same thing: things NOT to do if you want a foreiner to become your friend.
Here are things that will make a foreigner more likely to develope a true friendship with you.
we are people just like you.
I think some Chinese people forget that and treat us very differently than they would their own Chinese friends which can be very uncomfortable for us.
Good luck and I hope you make lots of real foreign friends!!

I, personally, think you can learn an incredible amount by speaking to another person in your target language.
My spoken Chinese skills are strong because I took advantage of whatever opportunity I had to speak in Chinese.
Don't be afraid to make mistakes — you're only going to get better faster.

Anyways, to answer your question, you might want to check out these websites (both of them are free, although you can upgrade to additional benefits for a charge — but both of them are great without these extra benefits):
You can make friends on these sites and Skype them/possibly meet up to practice your English (and other languages).

Also, you can practice reading and writing on these sites/application as well.

I personally use HelloTalk the most day-to-day, and Lang-8 every so often to write journal entires which native speakers correct.

As a note, not as many people are native in both languages, but you will find plenty of people who are native in one and near-native in the other.
Hope this helped! :)

你好。
FYI there are chinese who are native English speakers.
You could find them.
Of course there are cultural differences you'll encounter.
As with all friends, find common interests? Maybe foods.
Of course, the language barrier.
Your English seems fine.
It usually helps with slang – but I dunno your age, but I can guess you are pretty young.
Although society has progressed, there may be misunderstandings.
About Chinese.
Debunk these myths.
It is best to be somewhat chill.
YouTube has some channels that talk about this stuff constructively and with an open mind.
Be more outgoing, unlike that myth, and try to make more eye contact.
I'm not very good at that either tbh.
There is no reason for them to make fun of your accent if you have one.
Exchanging words and stuff from both languages is another way to make acquaintances.
Don't be shy to speak even if you have an accent, or if it is difficult to make eye contact.
If you got different food, embrace it too.
The US is a “melting pot” of cultures.
There could be bad situations but I have not heard much.
I am half Chinese, and friends with quite a few Chinese and others of diverse backgrounds.
I don't know if this helps.
Just be yourself! Was this post too negative?
It depends on what you have in common- jokes, the news, language, dumplings, rice, etc.
I feel you are kind of vague.
Like, what are your likes and dislikes? How much English do you know? How comfortable are you with interacting with other cultures?
I see no reason to judge people based on race.
Just don't hang out with bad sorts.
Try out new foods (you don't need to eat them more than once unless you really want to), go to new places, etc.
San Francisco has many Chinese people.
There are Chinatowns all over the US.
So you can stay hooked up with Chinese culture while you are there.
If you are in the UK, or Australia, or are texting over long distance online, well….
While speaking, also take into consideration what they are saying; they are not a wall for testing your English; that makes them uncomfortable and drives them away.
If it helps, my mom just spoke what she knew until she learned more.
It turned out pretty well.
The usual part is: trying to understand despite differences, et cetera.
If it bothers you, discuss it with them.
Resolve it.
And I know often there may be many posts on quora showing the darker side of things, but that is just people being more open about stuff.
It is like this everywhere, just people don't always talk about it or it may be culturally unacceptable.
If you can make friends fine who are Chinese, then you can probably make friends fine with native English speakers.
It may seem counterintuitive, but there are some really sensitive topics; 1, weight.
2, politics.
3, appearance.
These are not universal.
Having an instrument in common might help.
Or having a family or something.
Maybe similar sivlings? Don't be too closed off, that isnt good.
Be a bit more open, or somewhat more open.
You may be too conaervative, I wouldn't know.
It really depends on how social you are.
Some world travellers learned how to be social by travelling all over.
Be positive.
You can do this!
And yeah.
Approach them.
Greet them.
Say hi.
Hallo.
How are you and what's your name?
About a topic; that is interesting/ I have a huge interest in ___.
How about you? Lolololllllolol.
It is usually about good idea to be friendly, when making acquaintances with anyone.
Seeming welcoming and sociable is a great thing.
Be happier.
Smile.
It is fine to talk about the moon festival, just not too much.
Technology, how you use it and gmes are a good topic.
Just go for it.
Nothing to lose.
Good luck.
And rhis may be early but 恭喜恭喜 and 恭喜发财.
Or something.

Hi there person from China.
I am an American living in China.
Unlike many foreigners I am also Chinese.
I can also speak pretty decent Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese, so I suppose people hold me to a different standard here.
I have quite a few friends, but in the beginning it was quite difficult to make friends and talk to people.
At my first job at a kindergarten, my Chinese wasn't that good.
I could see the frustration on my coworkers face as they tried to talk to me.
I would respond to them using English
One of my coworkers pushed me on the shoulder when we had an argument.
I didn't understand her Chinese and she didn't understand my English…
I didn't last too long at that preschool.
I had no clue what my coworkers were saying half of the time, and simple things that should be obvious, such as clarifying with me when payday was and how I was going to get paid were never told to me.
After that job I briefly dated a girl for a couple of weeks….
she just wanted to use me as a way to practice her English.
I was happy I got to spend time with a pretty girl but it got annoying having to translate my thoughts with my dictionary.
My Chinese improved a lot at my last job.
I taught English at an English training school.
(For you guys who are unaquainted, an English training school is a place where kids go after school to learn English.
It's like a kiddie day camp.
)
My boss spoke Chinese and English and over time my Chinese got slowly and slowly better.
I started to understand more conversations.
I understood most words that the other Chinese teachers would say, and if I didn't I had my dictionary.
Still, it was very odd being the token foreigner at my school.
I had the appearance of a Chinese person but I had the upbringing of an American.
In the beginning I just went to work and taught children.
Who knew that reverse discrimination could exist?
Our school principal later told me that many of the parents were angry.
They paid a lot of money to send their kid to this English training school, and their teacher was Chinese? How could they be sure that this teacher was actually a foreigner?
I didn't realize this.
In some ways I caused my boss to lose some business – – he even messaged the parents and advocated on my behalf.
What these parents were doing was reverse discrimination.
Simply put, if you were not happy with the style of education, our school would do our best to improve.
But if you were dissatisfied because you wanted a white face, then you should deal with your own prejudices first.
Some of the parents didn't like me very much.
And that's fine.
They didn't know if they should speak Chinese or English with me.
Many of the parents however, started to finally trust me after months of working at the school.
I spoke Cantonese Chinese because I could express what I wanted to say.
It is not perfect, but it's better than my Mandarin.
My parents would ask me how their student was performing at school.
A lot of what I told them was redundant.
Your child is pronouncing letter A like letter E.
Your child sucks their thumb during class.
She's a little unfocused in class.
My boss would tell me that I am making a difference in the children's lives.
My requirements for a good class were not very high.
As long as the kids were happy, and as long as they learned something, no matter how small, I was satisfied.
A few of our students didn't do so well.
Parents need to be involved in their students education in order to succeed.
I quit my job because I want to go back home to back to LA.
I don't think teaching kids that letter A sounds like /a/ /a/ /a/ is enough to foster a good education.
In short….
Be friends with people just to be friends.
Maybe you have a friend who can speak a different language.
That's really cool.
But don't just follow them around only because you want to learn English.
Be nice to them and take care of them.

I’m also the English beginner.
I have same question as you have(So I use first person to present my opinion).
I have got big improvement on English recently.
I share my experience in here.
I wish that would help you and me.
Basic concepts in “our” mind before “we” start:
So for a very long time we will be in great pain.
Don’t dwell on shortcut too much.
The only pill can cure our pain is TIME.
My experience and advice (I’m still in stage of developing):
Tools I’m using now:
Other advises, articulation is better than pretentiously fast speak.
Let listener understood is first priority.
I’m also an English beginner, this is only my $0.
02.
BTW, please don’t try to lick someone’s arrogant asses(Chinglish) even sleep with them because if we do that some of them think their asses smell good to us and sleeping with them is some kind of equivalent exchange.
There are my contact information on my profile.
You can link to me if you like.
Let us work together to upgrade ourselves.
Thanks.
Best Regards

Have you tried Couchsurfing?
I'm a native English speaker who visited China for 6 weeks this year and I met up with and connected with several Chinese native people through couchsurfing.
We hiked on the Great Wall together and did a cooking class.
Sometimes we just swapped WeChat IDs and talked on there.
As a foreigner in China, people are interested in learning more about the culture, what there is to see/do/eat and learning the language.
If you offer them the chance to do any of these, they will contact you and want to spend time with you.
If you search for travellers and hosts in your home town using the Couchsurfing website, you can contact travellers and expats, and offer to show them around or have a meal together.
You could even organise a public event on Couchsurfing for English language exchange.
Invite some of your Chinese friends and make the event appealing to foreigners by hosting a free tour or organising to go out to a traditional Chinese meal together.
Travellers love to meet local people and you could even end up making friendships that extend beyond learning English.
Another option:
I met a guy in Japan who learnt pretty much fluent spoken English from playing Minecraft using a microphone and headset with native English speakers.
He was so fluent even with slang and swear words after less than a year.

Love your question! If you live in a non-English speaking country, making native English-speaking friends can be a challenge.
But there are many online communities and meet-up groups that you can become part of.
Check out the following web-sites that let you make friends from abroad.
Become friends with foreigners for a variety of reasons, but the first should always be that you actually LIKE that person.
Being friends with native speakers is a great way to improve your English, but using foreigners to improve your English is a great way to be a shitty friend.
That being said, almost every moderate sized city has several “foreign hangouts”.
These are generally cafes/chill bars.
Universities usually have foreign students.
Clubs are a place to meet people but you can't really have a good conversation there.
I can only speak for myself, but I've had western friend express the same thing: things NOT to do if you want a foreiner to become your friend.
Here are things that will make a foreigner more likely to develope a true friendship with you.
we are people just like you.
I think some Chinese people forget that and treat us very differently than they would their own Chinese friends which can be very uncomfortable for us.
Good luck and I hope you make lots of real foreign friends!!

I, personally, think you can learn an incredible amount by speaking to another person in your target language.
My spoken Chinese skills are strong because I took advantage of whatever opportunity I had to speak in Chinese.
Don't be afraid to make mistakes — you're only going to get better faster.

Anyways, to answer your question, you might want to check out these websites (both of them are free, although you can upgrade to additional benefits for a charge — but both of them are great without these extra benefits):
You can make friends on these sites and Skype them/possibly meet up to practice your English (and other languages).

Also, you can practice reading and writing on these sites/application as well.

I personally use HelloTalk the most day-to-day, and Lang-8 every so often to write journal entires which native speakers correct.

As a note, not as many people are native in both languages, but you will find plenty of people who are native in one and near-native in the other.
Hope this helped! :)

你好。
FYI there are chinese who are native English speakers.
You could find them.
Of course there are cultural differences you'll encounter.
As with all friends, find common interests? Maybe foods.
Of course, the language barrier.
Your English seems fine.
It usually helps with slang – but I dunno your age, but I can guess you are pretty young.
Although society has progressed, there may be misunderstandings.
About Chinese.
Debunk these myths.
It is best to be somewhat chill.
YouTube has some channels that talk about this stuff constructively and with an open mind.
Be more outgoing, unlike that myth, and try to make more eye contact.
I'm not very good at that either tbh.
There is no reason for them to make fun of your accent if you have one.
Exchanging words and stuff from both languages is another way to make acquaintances.
Don't be shy to speak even if you have an accent, or if it is difficult to make eye contact.
If you got different food, embrace it too.
The US is a “melting pot” of cultures.
There could be bad situations but I have not heard much.
I am half Chinese, and friends with quite a few Chinese and others of diverse backgrounds.
I don't know if this helps.
Just be yourself! Was this post too negative?
It depends on what you have in common- jokes, the news, language, dumplings, rice, etc.
I feel you are kind of vague.
Like, what are your likes and dislikes? How much English do you know? How comfortable are you with interacting with other cultures?
I see no reason to judge people based on race.
Just don't hang out with bad sorts.
Try out new foods (you don't need to eat them more than once unless you really want to), go to new places, etc.
San Francisco has many Chinese people.
There are Chinatowns all over the US.
So you can stay hooked up with Chinese culture while you are there.
If you are in the UK, or Australia, or are texting over long distance online, well….
While speaking, also take into consideration what they are saying; they are not a wall for testing your English; that makes them uncomfortable and drives them away.
If it helps, my mom just spoke what she knew until she learned more.
It turned out pretty well.
The usual part is: trying to understand despite differences, et cetera.
If it bothers you, discuss it with them.
Resolve it.
And I know often there may be many posts on quora showing the darker side of things, but that is just people being more open about stuff.
It is like this everywhere, just people don't always talk about it or it may be culturally unacceptable.
If you can make friends fine who are Chinese, then you can probably make friends fine with native English speakers.
It may seem counterintuitive, but there are some really sensitive topics; 1, weight.
2, politics.
3, appearance.
These are not universal.
Having an instrument in common might help.
Or having a family or something.
Maybe similar sivlings? Don't be too closed off, that isnt good.
Be a bit more open, or somewhat more open.
You may be too conaervative, I wouldn't know.
It really depends on how social you are.
Some world travellers learned how to be social by travelling all over.
Be positive.
You can do this!
And yeah.
Approach them.
Greet them.
Say hi.
Hallo.
How are you and what's your name?
About a topic; that is interesting/ I have a huge interest in ___.
How about you? Lolololllllolol.
It is usually about good idea to be friendly, when making acquaintances with anyone.
Seeming welcoming and sociable is a great thing.
Be happier.
Smile.
It is fine to talk about the moon festival, just not too much.
Technology, how you use it and gmes are a good topic.
Just go for it.
Nothing to lose.
Good luck.
And rhis may be early but 恭喜恭喜 and 恭喜发财.
Or something.

Hi there person from China.
I am an American living in China.
Unlike many foreigners I am also Chinese.
I can also speak pretty decent Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese, so I suppose people hold me to a different standard here.
I have quite a few friends, but in the beginning it was quite difficult to make friends and talk to people.
At my first job at a kindergarten, my Chinese wasn't that good.
I could see the frustration on my coworkers face as they tried to talk to me.
I would respond to them using English
One of my coworkers pushed me on the shoulder when we had an argument.
I didn't understand her Chinese and she didn't understand my English…
I didn't last too long at that preschool.
I had no clue what my coworkers were saying half of the time, and simple things that should be obvious, such as clarifying with me when payday was and how I was going to get paid were never told to me.
After that job I briefly dated a girl for a couple of weeks….
she just wanted to use me as a way to practice her English.
I was happy I got to spend time with a pretty girl but it got annoying having to translate my thoughts with my dictionary.
My Chinese improved a lot at my last job.
I taught English at an English training school.
(For you guys who are unaquainted, an English training school is a place where kids go after school to learn English.
It's like a kiddie day camp.
)
My boss spoke Chinese and English and over time my Chinese got slowly and slowly better.
I started to understand more conversations.
I understood most words that the other Chinese teachers would say, and if I didn't I had my dictionary.
Still, it was very odd being the token foreigner at my school.
I had the appearance of a Chinese person but I had the upbringing of an American.
In the beginning I just went to work and taught children.
Who knew that reverse discrimination could exist?
Our school principal later told me that many of the parents were angry.
They paid a lot of money to send their kid to this English training school, and their teacher was Chinese? How could they be sure that this teacher was actually a foreigner?
I didn't realize this.
In some ways I caused my boss to lose some business – – he even messaged the parents and advocated on my behalf.
What these parents were doing was reverse discrimination.
Simply put, if you were not happy with the style of education, our school would do our best to improve.
But if you were dissatisfied because you wanted a white face, then you should deal with your own prejudices first.
Some of the parents didn't like me very much.
And that's fine.
They didn't know if they should speak Chinese or English with me.
Many of the parents however, started to finally trust me after months of working at the school.
I spoke Cantonese Chinese because I could express what I wanted to say.
It is not perfect, but it's better than my Mandarin.
My parents would ask me how their student was performing at school.
A lot of what I told them was redundant.
Your child is pronouncing letter A like letter E.
Your child sucks their thumb during class.
She's a little unfocused in class.
My boss would tell me that I am making a difference in the children's lives.
My requirements for a good class were not very high.
As long as the kids were happy, and as long as they learned something, no matter how small, I was satisfied.
A few of our students didn't do so well.
Parents need to be involved in their students education in order to succeed.
I quit my job because I want to go back home to back to LA.
I don't think teaching kids that letter A sounds like /a/ /a/ /a/ is enough to foster a good education.
In short….
Be friends with people just to be friends.
Maybe you have a friend who can speak a different language.
That's really cool.
But don't just follow them around only because you want to learn English.
Be nice to them and take care of them.

I’m also the English beginner.
I have same question as you have(So I use first person to present my opinion).
I have got big improvement on English recently.
I share my experience in here.
I wish that would help you and me.
Basic concepts in “our” mind before “we” start:
So for a very long time we will be in great pain.
Don’t dwell on shortcut too much.
The only pill can cure our pain is TIME.
My experience and advice (I’m still in stage of developing):
Tools I’m using now:
Other advises, articulation is better than pretentiously fast speak.
Let listener understood is first priority.
I’m also an English beginner, this is only my $0.
02.
BTW, please don’t try to lick someone’s arrogant asses(Chinglish) even sleep with them because if we do that some of them think their asses smell good to us and sleeping with them is some kind of equivalent exchange.
There are my contact information on my profile.
You can link to me if you like.
Let us work together to upgrade ourselves.
Thanks.
Best Regards

Have you tried Couchsurfing?
I'm a native English speaker who visited China for 6 weeks this year and I met up with and connected with several Chinese native people through couchsurfing.
We hiked on the Great Wall together and did a cooking class.
Sometimes we just swapped WeChat IDs and talked on there.
As a foreigner in China, people are interested in learning more about the culture, what there is to see/do/eat and learning the language.
If you offer them the chance to do any of these, they will contact you and want to spend time with you.
If you search for travellers and hosts in your home town using the Couchsurfing website, you can contact travellers and expats, and offer to show them around or have a meal together.
You could even organise a public event on Couchsurfing for English language exchange.
Invite some of your Chinese friends and make the event appealing to foreigners by hosting a free tour or organising to go out to a traditional Chinese meal together.
Travellers love to meet local people and you could even end up making friendships that extend beyond learning English.
Another option:
I met a guy in Japan who learnt pretty much fluent spoken English from playing Minecraft using a microphone and headset with native English speakers.
He was so fluent even with slang and swear words after less than a year.

Love your question! If you live in a non-English speaking country, making native English-speaking friends can be a challenge.
But there are many online communities and meet-up groups that you can become part of.
Check out the following web-sites that let you make friends from abroad.
   I suggest you look at all of the "answers" that people give and see what kind of communication skills that person has.
  If you think them good,  reply to what they write, and ask for a  practice lesson.
  Ask if they charge money, because not all do.
   See  if you feel good about  their  method of teaching.
   Do they  teach you in a different way than you have experienced in  the past?
Do they make you feel as though  learning is difficult?
     Because I propose this to you.
    If  a  teacher is good,  it is the teacher that does most of the work.
A good teacher will make  learning  easy for the student.
     If a teacher or tutor is  suggesting that you  .
.
.
.
you know, 
Read—Everything—You—Can,  it means that the teacher has nothing new or special to show you.
  There are lots of those on the Internet.
  That is about the worst way to learn everything.
  
  You will need a teacher that will show you   a  basic framework.
For example,   if you wanted to travel from City A  to City   Z,  you would not be told to take   All—The—Roads to get there.
  So you would not want to be told to
Read—Everything—You—-Can  to learn English.
   When you see people suggesting that you Study—All—The—English—Vocabulary—In—The—Word,  it means that it  will probably take you  forever
to learn  All—The—Words.
   It is not  helpful that you attempt to study All—The—Words.
There are too many.
  You need to learn a  few words,  and  you need to build a strong
foundation with them.
  It is rather like building  a strong Castle.
You begin with these great big "dumb" blocks, and then layer by layer,
pile other big "dumb" blocks on top of them.
   The four  walls of your Castle will be in specific divisions
   Look at my answers  to questions about learning English  or Education in general.
  If you think I might help you,  feel free to ask for a meeting on Skype.
   My single difficulty with some students,  is that they  only want to carry on some kind of meaningless and mundane conversation   about something like;
"What movies do you  like?"   or   "Can I talk to you about what movies I like.
"
     Speaking lessons like that are  of little value.
   I have a full range of lessons ready to show students.
  They start  out very simple, and become more complex.
  If I give a student a lesson by e-mail,  I expect for them to read that many times before the following lesson.
  Students who think that they can read something one time,  and get some kind of "magical" knowledge of English,  are not going to advance very quickly.
    I repeat a lot of my vocabulary in the lessons that are given later.
This develops strength  in the student's  speaking and writing skill.
  The reason for this is that the best way to learn to speak and write in any language, is repetition.
   Repetition.
     Repetition.
   The  same words are used in different   sentences.
    I will also tell you this for a fact.
The very best methods of acquiring skill in English,
just are not in  the books.
  

How do I get acquainted and make friends with native English speakers?

There are some great answers here, but I'm going to add a little cautionary two cents.
I'm an American foreigner living in China.
I have tons of Chinese friends.
Why are they my friends? Because we genuinely like each other and enjoy spending time together.
I have never ever become friends with someone who said, “Can we make (be) friends so you can help me improve my English?!” I absolutely HATE this question.
Not because I don't like Chinese people, but because I dislike the idea of someone USING me just to learn English.
Teaching English is my job.
How would you feel if I found out you were a cook and I said “"Oh! Can we make friends so that you can come to my house and cook me breakfast?” For me, maybe not all foreigners, it feels like being taken advantage of.
Become friends with foreigners for a variety of reasons, but the first should always be that you actually LIKE that person.
Being friends with native speakers is a great way to improve your English, but using foreigners to improve your English is a great way to be a shitty friend.
That being said, almost every moderate sized city has several “foreign hangouts”.
These are generally cafes/chill bars.
Universities usually have foreign students.
Clubs are a place to meet people but you can't really have a good conversation there.
I can only speak for myself, but I've had western friend express the same thing: things NOT to do if you want a foreiner to become your friend.
Here are things that will make a foreigner more likely to develope a true friendship with you.
we are people just like you.
I think some Chinese people forget that and treat us very differently than they would their own Chinese friends which can be very uncomfortable for us.
Good luck and I hope you make lots of real foreign friends!!

I, personally, think you can learn an incredible amount by speaking to another person in your target language.
My spoken Chinese skills are strong because I took advantage of whatever opportunity I had to speak in Chinese.
Don't be afraid to make mistakes — you're only going to get better faster.

Anyways, to answer your question, you might want to check out these websites (both of them are free, although you can upgrade to additional benefits for a charge — but both of them are great without these extra benefits):
You can make friends on these sites and Skype them/possibly meet up to practice your English (and other languages).

Also, you can practice reading and writing on these sites/application as well.

I personally use HelloTalk the most day-to-day, and Lang-8 every so often to write journal entires which native speakers correct.

As a note, not as many people are native in both languages, but you will find plenty of people who are native in one and near-native in the other.
Hope this helped! :)

你好。
FYI there are chinese who are native English speakers.
You could find them.
Of course there are cultural differences you'll encounter.
As with all friends, find common interests? Maybe foods.
Of course, the language barrier.
Your English seems fine.
It usually helps with slang – but I dunno your age, but I can guess you are pretty young.
Although society has progressed, there may be misunderstandings.
About Chinese.
Debunk these myths.
It is best to be somewhat chill.
YouTube has some channels that talk about this stuff constructively and with an open mind.
Be more outgoing, unlike that myth, and try to make more eye contact.
I'm not very good at that either tbh.
There is no reason for them to make fun of your accent if you have one.
Exchanging words and stuff from both languages is another way to make acquaintances.
Don't be shy to speak even if you have an accent, or if it is difficult to make eye contact.
If you got different food, embrace it too.
The US is a “melting pot” of cultures.
There could be bad situations but I have not heard much.
I am half Chinese, and friends with quite a few Chinese and others of diverse backgrounds.
I don't know if this helps.
Just be yourself! Was this post too negative?
It depends on what you have in common- jokes, the news, language, dumplings, rice, etc.
I feel you are kind of vague.
Like, what are your likes and dislikes? How much English do you know? How comfortable are you with interacting with other cultures?
I see no reason to judge people based on race.
Just don't hang out with bad sorts.
Try out new foods (you don't need to eat them more than once unless you really want to), go to new places, etc.
San Francisco has many Chinese people.
There are Chinatowns all over the US.
So you can stay hooked up with Chinese culture while you are there.
If you are in the UK, or Australia, or are texting over long distance online, well….
While speaking, also take into consideration what they are saying; they are not a wall for testing your English; that makes them uncomfortable and drives them away.
If it helps, my mom just spoke what she knew until she learned more.
It turned out pretty well.
The usual part is: trying to understand despite differences, et cetera.
If it bothers you, discuss it with them.
Resolve it.
And I know often there may be many posts on quora showing the darker side of things, but that is just people being more open about stuff.
It is like this everywhere, just people don't always talk about it or it may be culturally unacceptable.
If you can make friends fine who are Chinese, then you can probably make friends fine with native English speakers.
It may seem counterintuitive, but there are some really sensitive topics; 1, weight.
2, politics.
3, appearance.
These are not universal.
Having an instrument in common might help.
Or having a family or something.
Maybe similar sivlings? Don't be too closed off, that isnt good.
Be a bit more open, or somewhat more open.
You may be too conaervative, I wouldn't know.
It really depends on how social you are.
Some world travellers learned how to be social by travelling all over.
Be positive.
You can do this!
And yeah.
Approach them.
Greet them.
Say hi.
Hallo.
How are you and what's your name?
About a topic; that is interesting/ I have a huge interest in ___.
How about you? Lolololllllolol.
It is usually about good idea to be friendly, when making acquaintances with anyone.
Seeming welcoming and sociable is a great thing.
Be happier.
Smile.
It is fine to talk about the moon festival, just not too much.
Technology, how you use it and gmes are a good topic.
Just go for it.
Nothing to lose.
Good luck.
And rhis may be early but 恭喜恭喜 and 恭喜发财.
Or something.

Hi there person from China.
I am an American living in China.
Unlike many foreigners I am also Chinese.
I can also speak pretty decent Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese, so I suppose people hold me to a different standard here.
I have quite a few friends, but in the beginning it was quite difficult to make friends and talk to people.
At my first job at a kindergarten, my Chinese wasn't that good.
I could see the frustration on my coworkers face as they tried to talk to me.
I would respond to them using English
One of my coworkers pushed me on the shoulder when we had an argument.
I didn't understand her Chinese and she didn't understand my English…
I didn't last too long at that preschool.
I had no clue what my coworkers were saying half of the time, and simple things that should be obvious, such as clarifying with me when payday was and how I was going to get paid were never told to me.
After that job I briefly dated a girl for a couple of weeks….
she just wanted to use me as a way to practice her English.
I was happy I got to spend time with a pretty girl but it got annoying having to translate my thoughts with my dictionary.
My Chinese improved a lot at my last job.
I taught English at an English training school.
(For you guys who are unaquainted, an English training school is a place where kids go after school to learn English.
It's like a kiddie day camp.
)
My boss spoke Chinese and English and over time my Chinese got slowly and slowly better.
I started to understand more conversations.
I understood most words that the other Chinese teachers would say, and if I didn't I had my dictionary.
Still, it was very odd being the token foreigner at my school.
I had the appearance of a Chinese person but I had the upbringing of an American.
In the beginning I just went to work and taught children.
Who knew that reverse discrimination could exist?
Our school principal later told me that many of the parents were angry.
They paid a lot of money to send their kid to this English training school, and their teacher was Chinese? How could they be sure that this teacher was actually a foreigner?
I didn't realize this.
In some ways I caused my boss to lose some business – – he even messaged the parents and advocated on my behalf.
What these parents were doing was reverse discrimination.
Simply put, if you were not happy with the style of education, our school would do our best to improve.
But if you were dissatisfied because you wanted a white face, then you should deal with your own prejudices first.
Some of the parents didn't like me very much.
And that's fine.
They didn't know if they should speak Chinese or English with me.
Many of the parents however, started to finally trust me after months of working at the school.
I spoke Cantonese Chinese because I could express what I wanted to say.
It is not perfect, but it's better than my Mandarin.
My parents would ask me how their student was performing at school.
A lot of what I told them was redundant.
Your child is pronouncing letter A like letter E.
Your child sucks their thumb during class.
She's a little unfocused in class.
My boss would tell me that I am making a difference in the children's lives.
My requirements for a good class were not very high.
As long as the kids were happy, and as long as they learned something, no matter how small, I was satisfied.
A few of our students didn't do so well.
Parents need to be involved in their students education in order to succeed.
I quit my job because I want to go back home to back to LA.
I don't think teaching kids that letter A sounds like /a/ /a/ /a/ is enough to foster a good education.
In short….
Be friends with people just to be friends.
Maybe you have a friend who can speak a different language.
That's really cool.
But don't just follow them around only because you want to learn English.
Be nice to them and take care of them.

I’m also the English beginner.
I have same question as you have(So I use first person to present my opinion).
I have got big improvement on English recently.
I share my experience in here.
I wish that would help you and me.
Basic concepts in “our” mind before “we” start:
So for a very long time we will be in great pain.
Don’t dwell on shortcut too much.
The only pill can cure our pain is TIME.
My experience and advice (I’m still in stage of developing):
Tools I’m using now:
Other advises, articulation is better than pretentiously fast speak.
Let listener understood is first priority.
I’m also an English beginner, this is only my $0.
02.
BTW, please don’t try to lick someone’s arrogant asses(Chinglish) even sleep with them because if we do that some of them think their asses smell good to us and sleeping with them is some kind of equivalent exchange.
There are my contact information on my profile.
You can link to me if you like.
Let us work together to upgrade ourselves.
Thanks.
Best Regards

Have you tried Couchsurfing?
I'm a native English speaker who visited China for 6 weeks this year and I met up with and connected with several Chinese native people through couchsurfing.
We hiked on the Great Wall together and did a cooking class.
Sometimes we just swapped WeChat IDs and talked on there.
As a foreigner in China, people are interested in learning more about the culture, what there is to see/do/eat and learning the language.
If you offer them the chance to do any of these, they will contact you and want to spend time with you.
If you search for travellers and hosts in your home town using the Couchsurfing website, you can contact travellers and expats, and offer to show them around or have a meal together.
You could even organise a public event on Couchsurfing for English language exchange.
Invite some of your Chinese friends and make the event appealing to foreigners by hosting a free tour or organising to go out to a traditional Chinese meal together.
Travellers love to meet local people and you could even end up making friendships that extend beyond learning English.
Another option:
I met a guy in Japan who learnt pretty much fluent spoken English from playing Minecraft using a microphone and headset with native English speakers.
He was so fluent even with slang and swear words after less than a year.

Love your question! If you live in a non-English speaking country, making native English-speaking friends can be a challenge.
But there are many online communities and meet-up groups that you can become part of.
Check out the following web-sites that let you make friends from abroad.
   I suggest you look at all of the "answers" that people give and see what kind of communication skills that person has.
  If you think them good,  reply to what they write, and ask for a  practice lesson.
  Ask if they charge money, because not all do.
   See  if you feel good about  their  method of teaching.
   Do they  teach you in a different way than you have experienced in  the past?
Do they make you feel as though  learning is difficult?
     Because I propose this to you.
    If  a  teacher is good,  it is the teacher that does most of the work.
A good teacher will make  learning  easy for the student.
     If a teacher or tutor is  suggesting that you  .
.
.
.
you know, 
Read—Everything—You—Can,  it means that the teacher has nothing new or special to show you.
  There are lots of those on the Internet.
  That is about the worst way to learn everything.
  
  You will need a teacher that will show you   a  basic framework.
For example,   if you wanted to travel from City A  to City   Z,  you would not be told to take   All—The—Roads to get there.
  So you would not want to be told to
Read—Everything—You—-Can  to learn English.
   When you see people suggesting that you Study—All—The—English—Vocabulary—In—The—Word,  it means that it  will probably take you  forever
to learn  All—The—Words.
   It is not  helpful that you attempt to study All—The—Words.
There are too many.
  You need to learn a  few words,  and  you need to build a strong
foundation with them.
  It is rather like building  a strong Castle.
You begin with these great big "dumb" blocks, and then layer by layer,
pile other big "dumb" blocks on top of them.
   The four  walls of your Castle will be in specific divisions
   Look at my answers  to questions about learning English  or Education in general.
  If you think I might help you,  feel free to ask for a meeting on Skype.
   My single difficulty with some students,  is that they  only want to carry on some kind of meaningless and mundane conversation   about something like;
"What movies do you  like?"   or   "Can I talk to you about what movies I like.
"
     Speaking lessons like that are  of little value.
   I have a full range of lessons ready to show students.
  They start  out very simple, and become more complex.
  If I give a student a lesson by e-mail,  I expect for them to read that many times before the following lesson.
  Students who think that they can read something one time,  and get some kind of "magical" knowledge of English,  are not going to advance very quickly.
    I repeat a lot of my vocabulary in the lessons that are given later.
This develops strength  in the student's  speaking and writing skill.
  The reason for this is that the best way to learn to speak and write in any language, is repetition.
   Repetition.
     Repetition.
   The  same words are used in different   sentences.
    I will also tell you this for a fact.
The very best methods of acquiring skill in English,
just are not in  the books.
  

Updated: 25.06.2019 — 6:33 pm

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