How do I get a book published

How do I get a book published?

This is very old question.
I am not sure, whether it’s a duplicate question.
However, here goes my answer.
Assumptions: You are trying to publish a novel.
If you are trying to publish a text book the answer may vary.
Following are various publishing processes.
Most cases the charges vary from Rs30K INR to Rs 300K INR.
In US, the similar companies charge between $500- $15K.
Advantage and Disadvantage of Using Self-publishing
It is upto you to choose, which one suits you.
You can ignore following line if you want to not relevant to the question.
P.
S.
About Me: I was an investment banker, working for a Swiss bank prior to starting StoryMirror.
I was writing a book “Wheels Of Wish” – About a crime planned 800 years ago.
I felt it was good book as later it turned out to be a national best seller.
After I was done with the book, when I approached the publishers, I got resistance from traditional houses and self-publishing houses were asking exorbitant money close to Rs300K INR.
I thought why not solve the publishing problem and a company was born.
I along with Devendra built StoryMirror with an aim to give justice to creative community – Started with writing community – We have published 190 physical books so far, over 150K stories online, 3000 ebooks received and created 15 national best seller and reader base of 3M.

Step by Step? Ok, here goes!
Assuming you don't have an established fan base, you're probably looking at self publishing.
The probability of being selected by a publisher is extremely low.
For this reason, you'll want to prove yourself in the self publishing world first.

This is for traditional publishing only.
You find a publishing house that is publishing books like yours.
You find out if they are accepting unsolicited manuscripts.
Generally publishers of western, romance, mystery, scifi and fantasy still are.
You get their submissions requirements from the submissions area on their webpage, you follow them to the letter, and you send your manuscript.
If they are not accepting unsolicited manuscripts, you get an agent and the agent will submit the manuscript if it is any good.
If it is not, s/he will tell you.
If you submit it yourself, there is a long process to go through.
Let me explain the process here.
See this? This is an actual slush pile (where unsolicited manuscripts go)
Generally someone like a secretary goes through them and rejects certain things automatically.
(Believe me, I am not making this up) Things like manuscripts with illustrations, manuscripts handwritten, written in crayon, written on a yellow legal pad, written on one long continuous scroll, or basically manuscripts that don’t conform to the formatting.
Also, the initial sorter rejects anything that is based on someone else’s property, like, for instance, a Game of Thrones book by someone other than GRRM, or a Star Wars novel.
Then they sit there until the First Reader gets to them.
There may be more than one First Reader.
They are generally someone the editor trusts, who shares the editors taste.
The First Reader reads the synopsis and the first page.
That weeds out a lot.
Then he reads the first chapter.
That weeds out more.
Then he reads the first three chapters and the last chapter.
If the manuscript passes all that, he takes it home and reads the whole thing.
If it still passes muster it goes to an assistant editor where it goes through the whole process, and finally to the editor.
The longer your book takes in this process, the higher up the chain it got.

However, editors are crazy busy.
The fact that you got a personalized rejection letter is something; usually it’s a form-letter.
But because the editor had very little time, he was only able to dash off a note.
Always remember this mantra: Publishers are not in the business to publish books; like any other business, they are in this business to make money.
Thirty or forty years ago, editors could publish niche books they really believed in, knowing that the others would make up for the losses on the oddball books.
Not any more.
Publishing companies are now owned by media conglomerates, and editors are under incredible pressure to make every book pay off.
You have two options here if you get a rejection letter.
You can rewrite your book, or you can try somewhere else.
If you keep getting the same reaction, then your only option is going to be a rewrite or self-publishing.
But I can absolutely guarantee you that if your writing is any good it will always take about a year for you to get an answer.

And never, ever say “I’ll never submit to X again!” That’s just cutting off your own foot.
Admit gracefully that you didn’t write a book that fit what they were looking for at the time and move on.
They didn’t insult your firstborn child.
The book just wasn’t what they were looking for and they had the courtesy to give you a short answer why.
Try sending it somewhere else.
Remember: when it comes to sending an unsolicited manuscript, so far as the publisher is concerned, this is not you—
THIS is you—-
And there is an entire room full of people like you just waiting for their manuscripts to be read.

Congratulations! You've finished your manuscript! I hope you have an audience to give you a standing ovation, because the agents and the publishers are not going to give you one.
If you're looking to go the traditional publishing route because you are so very good, I hope you have been researching agents and publishers and reading up on their submission requirements before you've finished your final draft.
And — are you sitting down? — you're 10 percent done.
The traditional route is to find yourself an agent because publishers are too busy to be bothered with unknowns and you should be spending your time writing your next novel and planning your PR moves, and not studying which publisher is lacking what you have.
Literary agents are supposed to know this.
If you are a die-hard do-it-yourself-er, get thee to the reference section of the local library and pore over The Literary Marketplace, which lists publishers and agents by genre.
It's important to match your work to the right agent or publishing houses.
If your book's main character is a hard-drinking lesbian PI, you might as well flush 20 bucks down the toilet if you send your manuscript to a house specializing in Christian fiction (unless, of course, the whole thing is a come-to-Jesus story).
You will need to pitch your novel to your agent or prospective publisher.
Most publishers who will have the resources to do right by you will have a website with information about their submission requirements.
If you don't follow them, your manuscript won't be considered.
Most publishers/agents want you to send them a submission query letter before they will look at the rest of your work.
You'll need to describe:
If the agent or publisher wants to see your full manuscript after they've received your feeler letter, rejoice! But don't nag.
Find out what their evaluation time is and if you haven't heard from them in that time frame, contact them to politely ask if they have come to a decision.
If you have made multiple submissions to different publishers (or an agent has done this for you) and you're getting multiple bites for it, then the fun begins.
If you get too cavalier in a bidding war, that might get things off to a not-so-friendly start with the "winning" publisher.
Your publisher is supposed to be your partner, not your adversary.
Most agents take from 10 to 15 percent of royalties paid to you, and most publishers have a boilerplate contract wherein a few things are negotiable, such as which publishing rights you grant permission for them to format for distribution, i.
e.
world rights (meaning they can sell translation rights on your behalf, taking a percentage of royalties from such sales) or English world, or North American.
Sometimes you or your agent might want to reserve certain rights to sell yourself, such as movie rights, or ebook rights, or translation rights, if you know other companies that might be better able to exercise these rights.
Most traditional publishers will pay you an advance against royalties.
Publishing services like iUniverse and Outskirts Press will not.
The advance is usually a portion of the publisher's best bet as to what they can net in the first print run.
They want to make back their "plate" costs (the one-time costs leading up to the first impression of ink or toner on paper) and the advance they paid you plus a gross margin of usually at least 60%.
That's why they need to know how many words you've written and all about your market so they can run the numbers and offer you a fair advance against royalties.
Royalty rates can be anywhere between 5 percent and 20 percent, with either of these extremes being kind of rare.
It's usually around 10 to 15 percent of either the net received or the cover price.
Obviously a percentage of the cover price is a better deal for the author.
A percent on net is better for the publisher because different selling venues ask for different discounts, which would eat into the publisher's margin if they are paying on cover price.
Once your book sales have earned out the advance, then you get paid royalties either biannually or annually.
Even when your book sales are working against the advance, you should always get a royalty statement.
All of these details will be in the contract.
You also must have in the contract a clause that states a time frame within which the work will be published.
Typically this is within 18 months or less.
It's not ethical, but publishers have taken works off the market by just paying the advance and "delaying" publication until you get fed up and take your work elsewhere.
The truth is most publishers won't promote your book beyond the season in which it is released unless it's being released in stages, i.
e.
, hardcover first, then paperback.
Depending on the publisher an ebook edition may be released simultaneously.
It would be worthwhile for you to find out what the marketing budget is and in which publications your book will be announced.
There are many details in negotiating contracts that I cannot get into here so if you don't have an agent covering it for you, you may want to get a lawyer in publishing to look at it.
Don't get a regular lawyer to do this because they will raise questions that will annoy the piss out of the publisher and potentially kill the deal.
I've seen it happen.
Okay, so let's say you've negotiated the contract to your satisfaction and a publication date has been set, you had a contractual date to deliver your final manuscript, and you've met the date.
Next your book gets copy edited (and vetted to make sure nothing libelous is in there); you get to yea or nay the edits.
It then gets typeset and you should be allowed to review page proofs.
Your edits get incorporated to a second set of pages that most authors don't see; it depends on your deal.
The book is on a schedule and has an appointed date it's supposed to be at distribution channels and you don't want to mess with that because all of this runs on a time-sensitive "cash flow.
" Big publishers have all their print runs scheduled in advance to minimize cost and maximize profit.
If they lose their schedules with their printers bad things start to happen.

When your book goes into production it is usually about four months to get your first offset copy.
If you're printing digitally, about a month can get cut off the schedule.
Only the biggest authors can get a manuscript through this system in less than four months.
If all of the foregoing sounds like a major pain in the ass, there is a nontraditional way thanks to the internet and digital publishing.
What everyone forgot in the rise of large publishing houses is authors and printers with their hand-set plates of moveable type used to have direct relationships; authors are the original publishers.
On the internet, everything old is new again.
Now the "local printing press" is glowing right in your face, right now.
Self-publish digitally first, build an audience, save up funds for a print edition.
As an ex-traditional publisher, I say this with mixed feelings, but here goes: get into the Kindle Direct Program (KDP).
Amazon's CreateSpace site can help you put together your book for both the ebook platform and print format.
The path of nonresistance is the path of least resistance and Amazon has made it really easy to get you published.
It's the marketing and self-promotion that's daunting and time-consuming.
KDP is a 90-day agreement so if you don't get satisfaction, you can get out of the exclusive agreement and sell your book on the many other sites selling ebooks, such as Smashwords.
Start a blog and build an audience.
There are many free blogging platforms you can get set up on and share your progress with your imagined audience; publish excerpts; and get people involved with your vision.
Don't get disconcerted about talking to a seeming void.
People are listening.
You have to reach out and pull people toward you when you do this.
I'm partial to Aman Anand has done with Marco North, self-described "head rabbit" at The Bittersweet Group.
My stepfather, an independent record producer, used to say, "Throw enough [stuff] up against the wall and something's bound to stick.
" Don't take anything personally and never give up.

Gone are the days when traditional publishing was the only way of survival for a writer.
With the advent of digital age, newer, more efficient methods are seeing popularity.
There are main ways to publish a book(At least I am aware of these )-

1.
Self publishing-
Self publishing is all the rave now-a-days.
The number of readers have significantly increased and so has the number of writers.
New publishing houses that offer self publishing packages are springing up every now and then.
Typically these publishing houses offer their services in the form of various packages having various costs ranging from nominal towards the high extreme.
A glimpse of the same as an example is down below-
2.
Traditional publishing-
This is the “creme de la creme” of the publishing industry.
You need not pay a penny but the royalty received per copy is far less than that of self publishing.
Logically speaking, it should be that way.
As every possible expense is covered by the publishing house hence the royalty goes down.
But traditional publishing commands a different level of respect.
Traditional publishing has been present since the time novels were written for commercial purposes.
Some of the traditional publishers in India-
3.
eBook and anthology publishing-
This is another form of publishing that is gaining traction rapidly in the publishing scenario.
Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing ( Some small presses may exist and some imprints from larger publishing houses that are not textbook imprints might possibly exist.
Second, read the guidelines – every publisher has a set of guidelines for submissions or lets you know if they take cold submissions in the first place.
If a publisher does not take unsolicited submissions, you have no chance to be seen by them without an agent.
(And getting an agent is not at all easy.
Read this:
Your publisher is supposed to be your partner, not your adversary.
Most agents take from 10 to 15 percent of royalties paid to you, and most publishers have a boilerplate contract wherein a few things are negotiable, such as which publishing rights you grant permission for them to format for distribution, i.
e.
world rights (meaning they can sell translation rights on your behalf, taking a percentage of royalties from such sales) or English world, or North American.
Sometimes you or your agent might want to reserve certain rights to sell yourself, such as movie rights, or ebook rights, or translation rights, if you know other companies that might be better able to exercise these rights.
Most traditional publishers will pay you an advance against royalties.
Publishing services like iUniverse and Outskirts Press will not.
The advance is usually a portion of the publisher's best bet as to what they can net in the first print run.
They want to make back their "plate" costs (the one-time costs leading up to the first impression of ink or toner on paper) and the advance they paid you plus a gross margin of usually at least 60%.
That's why they need to know how many words you've written and all about your market so they can run the numbers and offer you a fair advance against royalties.
Royalty rates can be anywhere between 5 percent and 20 percent, with either of these extremes being kind of rare.
It's usually around 10 to 15 percent of either the net received or the cover price.
Obviously a percentage of the cover price is a better deal for the author.
A percent on net is better for the publisher because different selling venues ask for different discounts, which would eat into the publisher's margin if they are paying on cover price.
Once your book sales have earned out the advance, then you get paid royalties either biannually or annually.
Even when your book sales are working against the advance, you should always get a royalty statement.
All of these details will be in the contract.
You also must have in the contract a clause that states a time frame within which the work will be published.
Typically this is within 18 months or less.
It's not ethical, but publishers have taken works off the market by just paying the advance and "delaying" publication until you get fed up and take your work elsewhere.
The truth is most publishers won't promote your book beyond the season in which it is released unless it's being released in stages, i.
e.
, hardcover first, then paperback.
Depending on the publisher an ebook edition may be released simultaneously.
It would be worthwhile for you to find out what the marketing budget is and in which publications your book will be announced.
There are many details in negotiating contracts that I cannot get into here so if you don't have an agent covering it for you, you may want to get a lawyer in publishing to look at it.
Don't get a regular lawyer to do this because they will raise questions that will annoy the piss out of the publisher and potentially kill the deal.
I've seen it happen.
Okay, so let's say you've negotiated the contract to your satisfaction and a publication date has been set, you had a contractual date to deliver your final manuscript, and you've met the date.
Next your book gets copy edited (and vetted to make sure nothing libelous is in there); you get to yea or nay the edits.
It then gets typeset and you should be allowed to review page proofs.
Your edits get incorporated to a second set of pages that most authors don't see; it depends on your deal.
The book is on a schedule and has an appointed date it's supposed to be at distribution channels and you don't want to mess with that because all of this runs on a time-sensitive "cash flow.
" Big publishers have all their print runs scheduled in advance to minimize cost and maximize profit.
If they lose their schedules with their printers bad things start to happen.

When your book goes into production it is usually about four months to get your first offset copy.
If you're printing digitally, about a month can get cut off the schedule.
Only the biggest authors can get a manuscript through this system in less than four months.
If all of the foregoing sounds like a major pain in the ass, there is a nontraditional way thanks to the internet and digital publishing.
What everyone forgot in the rise of large publishing houses is authors and printers with their hand-set plates of moveable type used to have direct relationships; authors are the original publishers.
On the internet, everything old is new again.
Now the "local printing press" is glowing right in your face, right now.
Self-publish digitally first, build an audience, save up funds for a print edition.
As an ex-traditional publisher, I say this with mixed feelings, but here goes: get into the Kindle Direct Program (KDP).
Amazon's CreateSpace site can help you put together your book for both the ebook platform and print format.
The path of nonresistance is the path of least resistance and Amazon has made it really easy to get you published.
It's the marketing and self-promotion that's daunting and time-consuming.
KDP is a 90-day agreement so if you don't get satisfaction, you can get out of the exclusive agreement and sell your book on the many other sites selling ebooks, such as Smashwords.
Start a blog and build an audience.
There are many free blogging platforms you can get set up on and share your progress with your imagined audience; publish excerpts; and get people involved with your vision.
Don't get disconcerted about talking to a seeming void.
People are listening.
You have to reach out and pull people toward you when you do this.
I'm partial to
Aman Anand
has done with Marco North, self-described "head rabbit" at The Bittersweet Group.
My stepfather, an independent record producer, used to say, "Throw enough [stuff] up against the wall and something's bound to stick.
" Don't take anything personally and never give up.

Gone are the days when traditional publishing was the only way of survival for a writer.
With the advent of digital age, newer, more efficient methods are seeing popularity.
There are main ways to publish a book(At least I am aware of these )-

1.
Self publishing-
Self publishing is all the rave now-a-days.
The number of readers have significantly increased and so has the number of writers.
New publishing houses that offer self publishing packages are springing up every now and then.
Typically these publishing houses offer their services in the form of various packages having various costs ranging from nominal towards the high extreme.
A glimpse of the same as an example is down below-
2.
Traditional publishing-
This is the “creme de la creme” of the publishing industry.
You need not pay a penny but the royalty received per copy is far less than that of self publishing.
Logically speaking, it should be that way.
As every possible expense is covered by the publishing house hence the royalty goes down.
But traditional publishing commands a different level of respect.
Traditional publishing has been present since the time novels were written for commercial purposes.
Some of the traditional publishers in India-
3.
eBook and anthology publishing-
This is another form of publishing that is gaining traction rapidly in the publishing scenario.
Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (Has your book been published yet

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