How different is Spain Spanish from say Mexican Spanish Puerto Rican Spanish Colombian Spanish etc Is CatalanCastilian that different from the Spanish we hear in the States

How different is Spain Spanish from, say, Mexican Spanish, Puerto Rican Spanish, Colombian Spanish, etc.? Is Catalan/Castilian that different from the Spanish we hear in the States?

First, Spanish is Spanish.
It’s also called Castilian, or castellano.
Catalan is a completely separate language, as is Gallego, both spoken in Spain.
Also considered dialects: Valencian and some people are pushing for Andaluz to be considered a separate dialect.
Also, they speak Basque in the north east of the country.
That’s completely unrelated to any other language.
Latin American Spanish has its differences by country and region.
But it’s still Spanish.
There are different accents, and colloquialisms.
There are some grammatical differences.
The language is understood everywhere.
It’s akin to the difference between British and American English.
“different from the Spanish we hear in the States”.
I hear Spain Spanish in the States.
And Mexican, and Guatemalan, and Argentinian, and Colombian, and on and on.
I hear people from EVERY Spanish speaking country in the US, so I’m not sure what you mean.
Also, I was taught all Spanish, by a woman who had lived in Spain, and whose favorite place to travel was Spain, so, even though the textbooks gave a cross-cultural base for the language, requiring the vosotros form, but the loísmo, direct objects, SHE made sure we understood leísmo, and how to use Uds.
in Latin America, and by 4th year, she started to pronounce the theta.
Here’s the basics: In most of Latin America, there are three forms of you: tú (informal, singular), Ud.
(formal singular) and Uds.
(plural).
In some parts of Latin America, they use vos.
This is used for the informal singular, at least, and takes a form based on the vosotros form, but changed.
When I was in school, we were told this was only used in Argentina.
Later, I learned it was used in Paraguay, too.
Now, I hear it used by people from any number of Central American countries, as well.
In Spain, when the object is a person, you use “le or les” (sing.
/plural).
A direct object that is not human, is lo/la/los/las.
In Latin America, you use lo/la/los/las for all direct objects, and le/les for all indirect objects.
In Spain, a Z or soft C is pronounced like the TH in think or the.
In Latin America, S, Z, and soft C all sound like an S in English.
That, and random words that are used in some countries, but not in others, but are universally understood, is the difference.

Spanish spoken in Spain and in Latin America is the same language, just as English spoken in the UK and the US.
Actually Spanish is more consistent since it doesn’t have different spellings and is supervised by a common institution, the

Think of it as American English VS.
British English VS.
Australian English etc.
Accents vary from country to country in Hispanic America and Spain and Equatorial New Guinea (yeah they speak Spanish in Africa).
Each country has different slang terms, different accents, but in the end it is all Spanish (Castilian), and we can all communicate with each other perfectly.
Catalan is a whole different language.
It is spoken in the Catalonia region of Spain.
Basque, Galician, Valencian, etc are other dialects spoken in the country too.
The people that speak these dialects speak Castilian Spanish as well.

Let me put it like this: Of course in structure, Spanish in all Countries that speak it is basically the same.
But…
There are, just like in the States, different accents from one state or region to another.
Also, it may incorporate some costumary local words or expressions, even from Native languages.
And I’m talking, of course, only about México.
Now imagine the same in Spain.
I ignore if in Puerto Rico is the same, but now apply that rule in between all Countries.
There’s also a difference depending on how educated people is, of course.
The main difference however, is pronunciation of certain sounds.
For Mexicans, Spaniards have a “ceceo” (a sort of lisp), they pronounce ‘c’ and ‘z’ as the English ‘th’.
For them, Mexicans have a “seseo”: we pronounce both c and z as ‘s’.
Puertoricans tend to pronounce some r’s very softly, which make them sound as ‘l’.
Here in México, people on both Coasts tend to skip the s, and replace it with a sort of, for you, a hard “h”.
Yes, it IS complicated.
But also very similar to what we face with American, British, Scottish or Jamaican accents…

Some words are different, accents are different, but they are all the same language.
Spanish, named Castilian too, is the most spoken language in Spain and America; Catalan is a different language spoken in a 3 Spanish regions, its origin is Latin, the same than Spanish and very similar.

The biggest difference between all of them is the slag, but Puerto Rican ,Colombians, Salvadorian ,etc tend to cut letters from the words, making them shorter Mexican people actually don’t do that, but it is different from Spain Spanish for example they way both countries say you guys in Mexico we say ‘ustedes’ but in Spain they ‘vosotros’ it has the same meaning but is said different, but for the most part if you understand one you should be able to understand the other.

How different is Spain Spanish from, say, Mexican Spanish, Puerto Rican Spanish, Colombian Spanish, etc.? Is Catalan/Castilian that different from the Spanish we hear in the States?

First, Spanish is Spanish.
It’s also called Castilian, or castellano.
Catalan is a completely separate language, as is Gallego, both spoken in Spain.
Also considered dialects: Valencian and some people are pushing for Andaluz to be considered a separate dialect.
Also, they speak Basque in the north east of the country.
That’s completely unrelated to any other language.
Latin American Spanish has its differences by country and region.
But it’s still Spanish.
There are different accents, and colloquialisms.
There are some grammatical differences.
The language is understood everywhere.
It’s akin to the difference between British and American English.
“different from the Spanish we hear in the States”.
I hear Spain Spanish in the States.
And Mexican, and Guatemalan, and Argentinian, and Colombian, and on and on.
I hear people from EVERY Spanish speaking country in the US, so I’m not sure what you mean.
Also, I was taught all Spanish, by a woman who had lived in Spain, and whose favorite place to travel was Spain, so, even though the textbooks gave a cross-cultural base for the language, requiring the vosotros form, but the loísmo, direct objects, SHE made sure we understood leísmo, and how to use Uds.
in Latin America, and by 4th year, she started to pronounce the theta.
Here’s the basics: In most of Latin America, there are three forms of you: tú (informal, singular), Ud.
(formal singular) and Uds.
(plural).
In some parts of Latin America, they use vos.
This is used for the informal singular, at least, and takes a form based on the vosotros form, but changed.
When I was in school, we were told this was only used in Argentina.
Later, I learned it was used in Paraguay, too.
Now, I hear it used by people from any number of Central American countries, as well.
In Spain, when the object is a person, you use “le or les” (sing.
/plural).
A direct object that is not human, is lo/la/los/las.
In Latin America, you use lo/la/los/las for all direct objects, and le/les for all indirect objects.
In Spain, a Z or soft C is pronounced like the TH in think or the.
In Latin America, S, Z, and soft C all sound like an S in English.
That, and random words that are used in some countries, but not in others, but are universally understood, is the difference.

Spanish spoken in Spain and in Latin America is the same language, just as English spoken in the UK and the US.
Actually Spanish is more consistent since it doesn’t have different spellings and is supervised by a common institution, the

Think of it as American English VS.
British English VS.
Australian English etc.
Accents vary from country to country in Hispanic America and Spain and Equatorial New Guinea (yeah they speak Spanish in Africa).
Each country has different slang terms, different accents, but in the end it is all Spanish (Castilian), and we can all communicate with each other perfectly.
Catalan is a whole different language.
It is spoken in the Catalonia region of Spain.
Basque, Galician, Valencian, etc are other dialects spoken in the country too.
The people that speak these dialects speak Castilian Spanish as well.

Let me put it like this: Of course in structure, Spanish in all Countries that speak it is basically the same.
But…
There are, just like in the States, different accents from one state or region to another.
Also, it may incorporate some costumary local words or expressions, even from Native languages.
And I’m talking, of course, only about México.
Now imagine the same in Spain.
I ignore if in Puerto Rico is the same, but now apply that rule in between all Countries.
There’s also a difference depending on how educated people is, of course.
The main difference however, is pronunciation of certain sounds.
For Mexicans, Spaniards have a “ceceo” (a sort of lisp), they pronounce ‘c’ and ‘z’ as the English ‘th’.
For them, Mexicans have a “seseo”: we pronounce both c and z as ‘s’.
Puertoricans tend to pronounce some r’s very softly, which make them sound as ‘l’.
Here in México, people on both Coasts tend to skip the s, and replace it with a sort of, for you, a hard “h”.
Yes, it IS complicated.
But also very similar to what we face with American, British, Scottish or Jamaican accents…

Some words are different, accents are different, but they are all the same language.
Spanish, named Castilian too, is the most spoken language in Spain and America; Catalan is a different language spoken in a 3 Spanish regions, its origin is Latin, the same than Spanish and very similar.

The biggest difference between all of them is the slag, but Puerto Rican ,Colombians, Salvadorian ,etc tend to cut letters from the words, making them shorter Mexican people actually don’t do that, but it is different from Spain Spanish for example they way both countries say you guys in Mexico we say ‘ustedes’ but in Spain they ‘vosotros’ it has the same meaning but is said different, but for the most part if you understand one you should be able to understand the other.

Updated: 24.06.2019 — 8:10 pm

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