How did you become a good writer

How did you become a good writer?

You judge…
As he lays on his bed, closes his eyes and thinks about the questions, he lets his thoughts flourish, like scouts looking for answers, looking for more questions, watching the un-watched tones of life.
He starts feeling something inside his head, like an atom linking with another, creating minute vibrations in his medula and slowly filling between the stomach right till the tips of all his fingers, to the last split-hair, all conspiring to get answers.
The atoms in him, connects with the air he could feel on his skin and lets it connect with the walls, moving in transient motion, like an edm, harmonically.
The answers are still incomplete and the atoms find the window.
He gazes at it and can see the thick sky with twinkling stars and moon smiling a quarter of itself.
He thinks about the moon and then the poets.
They love writing about full moon.
On contrary, he loves writing about no moon, “a moon which has just begun to glow itself and within a couple of weeks will glow the world by its light before again letting the world shine till the next time it disappears.
.
” — isn’t it all that a humankind desires.
Tame-rise-complete-give-make a mark-leave.
As he lets the atoms connect his medula to the moon which is thousands of miles apart, he realizes what is being a writer?
Exploration.
Exploring the own versions of oneself.
Taking the world into an astral projection, he can fly with no wings above the sky and look at the earth standing in the space.
He can reach mantle of the earth in his projections and relate it with the heat he feels about life.
Writing is nuisance and beautiful.
Whimsical and vivacious.
Smothered yet burning.
Passionately calm.
Incompletely completing.
Competing.
Goosing.
Numbing.
Passionating.
what not—
It’s a constant journey of finding oneself to realize that the world doesn’t revolve around him.
It’s a practice of being attentive yet making mental notes.
It’s like taking out one strand at a time from a box of tangled threads and untangling it, thus taking a step close to your personal legend.
Thinking is a paradigm towards exploration, precisely crumbled exploration.
Writing let’s him iron it to have a wrinkle-free beliefs and perspectives and hence, whenever he feels a little “less” special about himself-
‘He becomes a writer.
.

For me, writing is not mere arranging the closet of words, proper spaced or proper punctuated.
It’s a need, an urge to express the complete energy I feel inside me and perhaps, make a reader feel the same.
Unsure if I am making a good writing, but I assure, writing makes me a good human.

I believe, this way “a writer is born.
.

By writing.
When I was younger, the only subjects I cared about in school were math and physics.
I hated the humanities, and especially history, because I felt that I was being asked to memorize things I didn’t care about.
I hated writing.
I didn’t feel like I had much to say.
And when I did want to say something, I didn’t understand why I couldn’t just get to the point and move on with my life.
Why did I have to go on and on for paragraphs at a time?
It wasn’t until I was 15 that I encountered a piece of literature I fell in love with.
That was Le Cid, by Pierre Corneille, a famous French playwright.
It was at that point that I learned that you could do more with words than merely convey information.
Still, my writing was execrable.
I resigned myself to the idea that I had no talent for it, and that I would just have to stick to my natural strengths.
But, along the way, I decided to try my hand at writing.
It really didn’t sit right with me that I would be condemned to eternal mediocrity, just because I didn’t happen to be born with a “gift” for writing.
So, every once in a while, I would try my hand at poetry.
The poetry was never good.
But eventually, it became something other than terrible.
I also tried my hand at essays.
If I knew a writing prompt ahead of time, I would try to compose grandiloquent paragraphs in my head in the days preceding my tests, so that I would at least have a strong introduction.
I was able to survive high school and college that way, but that can only take you so far.
In med school, you could, if you were so inclined, take a literature class.
I signed up for it.
I wrote, read my writings to a small audience, heard it critiqued, heard the writings of other students, picked up on some techniques, improved my craft, wrote some more, learned some more, and wrote yet more.
At the end of med school, I was a better writer.
But I wouldn’t have called myself above average.
The thing that made the biggest difference for me was Quora.
For the first time, I could get real-time data on the impact and effectiveness of my writings.
I could see what styles connected with readers, what lines elicited the most laughter, and what tropes brought me the most comments.
Over time, I have changed even the average length of my paragraphs.
Every seemingly inconsequential detail can make the difference between what pieces will be read, skimmed through, or skipped entirely.
And, most importantly, putting your writing out there for people to judge enables you to see a difference between what is aesthetically pleasing to yourself and what is most successful at engaging your audience.
There really isn’t any shortcut.
You become a better cook by cooking and having people taste your food.
You become a better dancer by dancing and having people evaluate your moves.
And you become a better writer by writing and having people give you lots and lots of feedback, sometimes with their words, and sometimes with their votes.

Writing entails a mixture of different skills.
Some of these skills are learned and perfected through voluntary and continued practice.
I perfected the art of writing through wide reading and writing for fun.
There are several ways that you can learn how to write well.
If you want to be the best writer in the world, please do the following;

Franklin Veaux touched on a similar experience to my own.
When I was a teenager, I was extremely sick.
I didn’t know I had Celiac Disease until I was 18—and for those that don’t know, if you have Celiac and continue to eat wheat, you don’t just feel physically sick, but you become mentally sick.
I was consistently depressed, anxious, and overly insecure.
One of the few places I found solace were online forums.
I would sit in the bathroom for hours, browsing the Interwebz on my dad’s laptop, reading forum posts from other kids about how they felt depressed, suicidal, and unhappy as well.
Knowing that I wasn’t alone made me feel understood, and at that time in my life I needed that more than ever.
A lot of people don’t consider me a great writer.
A lot of people, especially when I was first starting out, said that I was a horrific writer—and by the formal definition of what it means “to write,” I suppose they were correct.
I didn’t use commas.
My sentences were all extremely long run-ons.
I struggled to organize my thoughts.
I used brash language, or derivatives of words that were not grammatically correct.
I don’t think I ever received an A in English in high school.
Most semesters, I barely got a B.
But I had a voice.
And that’s why I continued to write.
You see, what nobody really tells you about writing or painting or music or acting is that the ladder of “success” is really only there to help you measure your technical skills.
That’s what is measurable: how well you can play your scales, how grammatically correct your sentences are, etc.
But the REAL artists, the ones who actually live and breathe their craft and go on to become successful tend to be the ones who, on some level possess technical skills, but even more so have their own voice.
You can’t teach voice.
You can’t teach “your own unique style.
” You either discover it, harness it, and have it, or you don’t.
As Franklin Veaux said, I have become a “good” writer because it’s what I do every single day.
I write more than I do anything else in life—so it would be fair to assume that over time I would improve.
But I will say that there are many other better technical writers out there.
There are better formatters, better journalists, better reviewers, better columnists, better pretty much everything.
They aren’t my competition though.
I enjoy learning from them, studying them, analyzing them, etc.
But they aren’t my measure for success.
My only competition is myself.
And my unique value is my voice.
What makes me, not a “good” writer, but a writer worth reading, is that I bleed on the page.
I truly believe that.
Everything I write, you are listening to the same voice as the kid who sat in the bathroom for the majority of his adolescence with his journal, trying to figure out who he was in this world.
That’s me, on paper.
Writing is where I am most vulnerable.
Writing is where I am the most real.
And that goes far beyond being “good” or “bad.

It simply Is.

The meaning of “The Best” depends mainly on what you want to achieve as a writer.
If you are satisfied by your work and your content gets appreciated you already are the best.
Focus on becoming a “Good Writer”.

Nothing is impossible and hard until you have a firm belief that you would become what you desire to!! Its not hard but it will come by practicing and a lot of practicing and i mean it.

If you wish to become a good writer work hard , be sincere towards your goal.

Writing is a skill which comes with time and experience.
Before starting you should ask few questions to yourself –
What to write(Content)?, How to write?, Where to write?.

The most important thing is that you should be passionate about what you write and keep writing for experience.
These are the basic tips which can help you start writing.

You can also pursue certified content writing courses online/offline to learn key skills of content writing.
There are many institutes which offer content writing courses one of them is Henry Harvin Education.
It is one of the best institute to go for.

Trainings360° is India's Leading Ranking Podium for Evaluating Training Providers.
Read the full article here – your life experiences from the day and brings them into a digital light.

Get down in the dirt of life and stop being afraid to get muddy.
Pull yourself out and then tell people about your experience while you are still covered in filth.
This is where great writers are born.

Hi, I’m Eva! [1]
I’m going to give you three quick methods that you can utilize to practice daily:
So to recap… How can you become a good writer? … READ, STUDY, and PRACTICE.
** In addition to doing those three things, you should always be working on your own “projects” daily.
This goes without saying, and should be understood.
WELCOME TO THE DISCIPLINE OF WRITING!
*** About Me:[4]

I lived.

I looked back.

I learned myself.

If you are one of my readers, you probably would have noticed that a majority of my writings are points taken from my own life.
My best writings come from deep self-assessment.
When you squeeze into your own story, when you drink the juice out of it and tell it in your own words…
That’s the writing people want to read.
Now, don’t get me wrong.
I am not a good writer: my sentences are awkwardly twisted and my vocabulary is terribly limited.
But, relatively, I know how and what story to tell.
The reason is because I constantly think and self-analyze my own situations.
My own feelings and emotions.
That is how I learned what story to tell.
What about how?
As many have already pointed out, learning how to write comes from knowing how to read.
By reading, I don’t mean the Shakespearean romances or George R.
R.
Martin’s masterpieces.
I started reading the writings of several popular writers in a writing platform called (wait for it!) Quora.
Some names I might mention include Dushka Zapata, James Altucher and Nicolas Cole (and many many more!).
I have went on and read their answers, analyzing them, noticing what they tried to achieve and how they managed to achieve them.
I have learned Dushka’s emotional and relatable style.
I have learned James’ killer first-sentences.
I have learned Nicolas Cole’s long writing-style and how he answered the questions with his own story.
I spent hours and hours on reading those, trying to self-produce the key lessons learned from their answers and noticed how they solved the writing pits when they faced ones.
How they transitioned, how they started their answers etc.
Everything.

At first, it seems like a waste of time: Hell, I was spending two hours on analyzing 300-word answer.
But, soon, it becomes obvious that two hours are worth 10 hours of passive reading.
Writing is all about the fundamentals.

When you learn from people who know how to write, you will become better.
So how did I learn to write?

Shilpi Dupattawala thank you for your question.
The funny thing is that I never thought writing was my strong point until a friend of mine asked me to write a column on his website a few years back.
Back in school, I always wrote good essays, and speeches but I didn’t think too much of that.
Additionally I always wanted to be able to write about diverse topics like style, relationships, people, and life.
I wanted to write to be able to strike a chord with people.
People I know, and people I don’t know.
As I have mentioned earlier, I received a compliment from renowned film maker Mahesh Bhatt for my writing.
He really liked my writing, and found it to be very relatable, and fun.
That’s when I thought, ‘This writing from the heart shit, works!’ and I continued doing it.
Unfortunately my friend’s website shut after a while but I kept writing articles on my blog.
People always seemed to post comments like ‘Wow, this is so relatable’ and ‘You spoke my mind’.
I knew that I was doing something right, and I found my niche.
That’s when I took to Quora.
I wrote some, and I wrote some more.
I started writing about the topics where I can write from the heart, and about personal experiences, and I continue to do so.
Thank you for enjoying my writing, and considering me a good writer, dear friends!

Learn your craft.
The man on top of the mountain didn’t just fall there.
Things take time.
If you wanted to fly a plane, what would you do? You'd find a ground school and take lessons.
If you wanted to play the piano, what would you do? You'd find a piano teacher and take classes.
What makes writing any different? Writing is an art, but it’s a learned art.
To ask someone how to write a story is like asking “How do I climb a mountain?” You don’t, unless you’ve had the training.
And no, it’s not rocket science, but writing is something that needs to be studied and practiced.
Anybody can sit down and write crap.
You see it all the time in self pubbed books.
Most people will tell you to just start writing, and keep writing, but I don't agree.
It's not enough to just write every day if you don't know what you're doing or how to improve something.
That just means days and weeks and months of useless writing.
It's like not knowing how to knit so you just keep making loops with the yarn.
You can't get better, you can't turn that into a scarf .
.
.
you have the desire, but you don't know how.
I'm going to give you my stock answer that I give everyone who asks me this question.
I'm going to give you some good advice on how to learn the craft, and give you a place to send in some of your work when you're ready.
In order to write stories that people want to read you will need to understand how to put one together.
There is a definite pattern and rhythm to it.
And there are certain expectations from the editors and publishing houses as to how your story is laid out.
You will need a good imagination, one that can look at a situation and picture all sorts of different scenarios.
You need to be able to ask 'what if' and come up with twists and lines that are new and fresh.
You will need to be able to research things.
For example I wrote a story set in Iran where there was a wedding.
I had to research how the wedding would take place, the food, the customs, common Iranian names, clothing, etc.
in order to write an interesting yet correct story.
Take classes in writing; grammar and punctuation (very important.
.
.
lots of self published books are swimming in glaring errors and typos), character building, dialogue, plotting, pacing, point of view (POV), inner and outer conflicts, subplots, scenes and sequels, genres, story boards, twists, chapter hooks, suspense, killer opening lines, and satisfying endings.
If you're going to write sci-fi you will need to take classes in world building.
Each genre of book has its own set of expectations from the reader that you will need to fulfill.
For example a murder mystery must have clues for the reader to try and solve.
A romance needs a happen ever after ending, known to writers as an HEA.
A thriller needs fast pacing and danger.
There are classes in short story writing.
Where to find these classes? Local community colleges often offer writing classes.
My local library has classes seasonally.
Best of all there are hundreds of classes you can take on-line.
They run about $25-$35 each and range from 2 to 4 weeks.
Google on-line writing classes and you will get lots of sites.
Try Franklin Veaux touched on a similar experience to my own.
When I was a teenager, I was extremely sick.
I didn’t know I had Celiac Disease until I was 18—and for those that don’t know, if you have Celiac and continue to eat wheat, you don’t just feel physically sick, but you become mentally sick.
I was consistently depressed, anxious, and overly insecure.
One of the few places I found solace were online forums.
I would sit in the bathroom for hours, browsing the Interwebz on my dad’s laptop, reading forum posts from other kids about how they felt depressed, suicidal, and unhappy as well.
Knowing that I wasn’t alone made me feel understood, and at that time in my life I needed that more than ever.
A lot of people don’t consider me a great writer.
A lot of people, especially when I was first starting out, said that I was a horrific writer—and by the formal definition of what it means “to write,” I suppose they were correct.
I didn’t use commas.
My sentences were all extremely long run-ons.
I struggled to organize my thoughts.
I used brash language, or derivatives of words that were not grammatically correct.
I don’t think I ever received an A in English in high school.
Most semesters, I barely got a B.
But I had a voice.
And that’s why I continued to write.
You see, what nobody really tells you about writing or painting or music or acting is that the ladder of “success” is really only there to help you measure your technical skills.
That’s what is measurable: how well you can play your scales, how grammatically correct your sentences are, etc.
But the REAL artists, the ones who actually live and breathe their craft and go on to become successful tend to be the ones who, on some level possess technical skills, but even more so have their own voice.
You can’t teach voice.
You can’t teach “your own unique style.
” You either discover it, harness it, and have it, or you don’t.
As Franklin Veaux said, I have become a “good” writer because it’s what I do every single day.
I write more than I do anything else in life—so it would be fair to assume that over time I would improve.
But I will say that there are many other better technical writers out there.
There are better formatters, better journalists, better reviewers, better columnists, better pretty much everything.
They aren’t my competition though.
I enjoy learning from them, studying them, analyzing them, etc.
But they aren’t my measure for success.
My only competition is myself.
And my unique value is my voice.
What makes me, not a “good” writer, but a writer worth reading, is that I bleed on the page.
I truly believe that.
Everything I write, you are listening to the same voice as the kid who sat in the bathroom for the majority of his adolescence with his journal, trying to figure out who he was in this world.
That’s me, on paper.
Writing is where I am most vulnerable.
Writing is where I am the most real.
And that goes far beyond being “good” or “bad.

It simply Is.

The meaning of “The Best” depends mainly on what you want to achieve as a writer.
If you are satisfied by your work and your content gets appreciated you already are the best.
Focus on becoming a “Good Writer”.

Nothing is impossible and hard until you have a firm belief that you would become what you desire to!! Its not hard but it will come by practicing and a lot of practicing and i mean it.

If you wish to become a good writer work hard , be sincere towards your goal.

Writing is a skill which comes with time and experience.
Before starting you should ask few questions to yourself –
What to write(Content)?, How to write?, Where to write?.

The most important thing is that you should be passionate about what you write and keep writing for experience.
These are the basic tips which can help you start writing.

You can also pursue certified content writing courses online/offline to learn key skills of content writing.
There are many institutes which offer content writing courses one of them is Henry Harvin Education.
It is one of the best institute to go for.

Trainings360° is India's Leading Ranking Podium for Evaluating Training Providers.
Read the full article here – your life experiences from the day and brings them into a digital light.

Get down in the dirt of life and stop being afraid to get muddy.
Pull yourself out and then tell people about your experience while you are still covered in filth.
This is where great writers are born.

Hi, I’m Eva! [1]
I’m going to give you three quick methods that you can utilize to practice daily:
So to recap… How can you become a good writer? … READ, STUDY, and PRACTICE.
** In addition to doing those three things, you should always be working on your own “projects” daily.
This goes without saying, and should be understood.
WELCOME TO THE DISCIPLINE OF WRITING!
*** About Me:[4]

I lived.

I looked back.

I learned myself.

If you are one of my readers, you probably would have noticed that a majority of my writings are points taken from my own life.
My best writings come from deep self-assessment.
When you squeeze into your own story, when you drink the juice out of it and tell it in your own words…
That’s the writing people want to read.
Now, don’t get me wrong.
I am not a good writer: my sentences are awkwardly twisted and my vocabulary is terribly limited.
But, relatively, I know how and what story to tell.
The reason is because I constantly think and self-analyze my own situations.
My own feelings and emotions.
That is how I learned what story to tell.
What about how?
As many have already pointed out, learning how to write comes from knowing how to read.
By reading, I don’t mean the Shakespearean romances or George R.
R.
Martin’s masterpieces.
I started reading the writings of several popular writers in a writing platform called (wait for it!) Quora.
Some names I might mention include Dushka Zapata, James Altucher and Nicolas Cole (and many many more!).
I have went on and read their answers, analyzing them, noticing what they tried to achieve and how they managed to achieve them.
I have learned Dushka’s emotional and relatable style.
I have learned James’ killer first-sentences.
I have learned Nicolas Cole’s long writing-style and how he answered the questions with his own story.
I spent hours and hours on reading those, trying to self-produce the key lessons learned from their answers and noticed how they solved the writing pits when they faced ones.
How they transitioned, how they started their answers etc.
Everything.

At first, it seems like a waste of time: Hell, I was spending two hours on analyzing 300-word answer.
But, soon, it becomes obvious that two hours are worth 10 hours of passive reading.
Writing is all about the fundamentals.

When you learn from people who know how to write, you will become better.
So how did I learn to write?

Shilpi Dupattawala thank you for your question.
The funny thing is that I never thought writing was my strong point until a friend of mine asked me to write a column on his website a few years back.
Back in school, I always wrote good essays, and speeches but I didn’t think too much of that.
Additionally I always wanted to be able to write about diverse topics like style, relationships, people, and life.
I wanted to write to be able to strike a chord with people.
People I know, and people I don’t know.
As I have mentioned earlier, I received a compliment from renowned film maker Mahesh Bhatt for my writing.
He really liked my writing, and found it to be very relatable, and fun.
That’s when I thought, ‘This writing from the heart shit, works!’ and I continued doing it.
Unfortunately my friend’s website shut after a while but I kept writing articles on my blog.
People always seemed to post comments like ‘Wow, this is so relatable’ and ‘You spoke my mind’.
I knew that I was doing something right, and I found my niche.
That’s when I took to Quora.
I wrote some, and I wrote some more.
I started writing about the topics where I can write from the heart, and about personal experiences, and I continue to do so.
Thank you for enjoying my writing, and considering me a good writer, dear friends!

Learn your craft.
The man on top of the mountain didn’t just fall there.
Things take time.
If you wanted to fly a plane, what would you do? You'd find a ground school and take lessons.
If you wanted to play the piano, what would you do? You'd find a piano teacher and take classes.
What makes writing any different? Writing is an art, but it’s a learned art.
To ask someone how to write a story is like asking “How do I climb a mountain?” You don’t, unless you’ve had the training.
And no, it’s not rocket science, but writing is something that needs to be studied and practiced.
Anybody can sit down and write crap.
You see it all the time in self pubbed books.
Most people will tell you to just start writing, and keep writing, but I don't agree.
It's not enough to just write every day if you don't know what you're doing or how to improve something.
That just means days and weeks and months of useless writing.
It's like not knowing how to knit so you just keep making loops with the yarn.
You can't get better, you can't turn that into a scarf .
.
.
you have the desire, but you don't know how.
I'm going to give you my stock answer that I give everyone who asks me this question.
I'm going to give you some good advice on how to learn the craft, and give you a place to send in some of your work when you're ready.
In order to write stories that people want to read you will need to understand how to put one together.
There is a definite pattern and rhythm to it.
And there are certain expectations from the editors and publishing houses as to how your story is laid out.
You will need a good imagination, one that can look at a situation and picture all sorts of different scenarios.
You need to be able to ask 'what if' and come up with twists and lines that are new and fresh.
You will need to be able to research things.
For example I wrote a story set in Iran where there was a wedding.
I had to research how the wedding would take place, the food, the customs, common Iranian names, clothing, etc.
in order to write an interesting yet correct story.
Take classes in writing; grammar and punctuation (very important.
.
.
lots of self published books are swimming in glaring errors and typos), character building, dialogue, plotting, pacing, point of view (POV), inner and outer conflicts, subplots, scenes and sequels, genres, story boards, twists, chapter hooks, suspense, killer opening lines, and satisfying endings.
If you're going to write sci-fi you will need to take classes in world building.
Each genre of book has its own set of expectations from the reader that you will need to fulfill.
For example a murder mystery must have clues for the reader to try and solve.
A romance needs a happen ever after ending, known to writers as an HEA.
A thriller needs fast pacing and danger.
There are classes in short story writing.
Where to find these classes? Local community colleges often offer writing classes.
My local library has classes seasonally.
Best of all there are hundreds of classes you can take on-line.
They run about $25-$35 each and range from 2 to 4 weeks.
Google on-line writing classes and you will get lots of sites.
Try Can anybody become a writer

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  • Can reading improve my writing skills
  • Can one learn Spanish from Duolingo
  • How can I become fluent in English
  • Can I write anything here about love
  • Do writers get paid on Wattpad
  • Do authors write more than one book at a time
  • How can we write a novel
  • Can reading improve my writing skills
  • Can one learn Spanish from Duolingo
  • Can I write anything here about love
  • Can I write a story in 2nd POV without making it a cook book or am I breaking some sort of rule
  • As an author how do you inspire yourself to write when you dont feel like it
  • Can one learn all the English grammar rules
  • What is the worst advice about writing a book that youve received
  • What can I say to my friend I was not sure what to say about a 13yearold teen wanting to read Fifty shades of grey could a 13yearold handle reading it
  • Can you write something so sad that it would make me feel something
  • Can I write a story in 2nd POV without making it a cook book or am I breaking some sort of rule
  • Do you like reading books
  • Do you think James Frey did anything really wrong in writing the book A Million Little Pieces I did not see what Oprah did to him My sister in laws friend knew him and said that he was as bad as in the book
  • Do you think James Frey did anything really wrong in writing the book A Million Little Pieces I did not see what Oprah did to him My sister in laws friend knew him and said that he was as bad as in the book
  • Do you like reading books
  • Can you write something so sad that it would make me feel something
  • As an author how do you inspire yourself to write when you dont feel like it
  • Can one learn all the English grammar rules
  • How are you as a teenager different from other teenagers
  • Has the Great American novel already been written If you think so what is your choice and why
  • Does grammar really matter when we learn English
  • How can I improve my English speaking reading and writing
  • How can I write a good book
  • Does grammar really matter when we learn English
  • Has the Great American novel already been written If you think so what is your choice and why
  • Whats the best writing advice you had to learn for yourself