How can I stay motivated to write

How can I stay motivated to write?

Every year I started a blog, only to delete it a month later because I wasn’t getting enough of anything.
I always compared the number of likes I got for a post with other popular writers and set myself a standard where I felt my content was good only if I reached a certain number.
I was trapped in a vicious cycle and surrendered myself to the external environment to influence my emotions and words.

I became vividly aware of this cycle when I posted a poem and waited for the likes to barge in.
Two days later when I read the poem, I was shocked.
As much as I’d felt the poem, I had written it in the intention of getting more likes and views rather than enjoying it.
That’s when I took a break.
It’s been a month and I haven’t been able to write.
The infamous writer’s block.
After a month of lazy complaints and unmotivated attitude, I realized I’ll never be motivated enough to write.

I will have moments where I get sudden inspiration and write an amazing piece with intense motivation, but I also know it’s going to be rare.
Motivation is dangerous to rely on when it comes to writing.
As weird as this sounds, your want to write must solely rely on your want to write.
Motivation comes and goes, what should always remain are the words.
I recently came across a Prathyusha

Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.
– Stephen King

“Just write every day of your life.
Read intensely.
Then see what happens.
Most of my friends who are put on that diet have very pleasant careers.
” – Ray Bradbury

Writing is like a muscle.
It can be developed by routine and expectation.
If you set an intention to write each day, make it a priority and do it consistently, you will be amazed by the progress you make.
I have searched for another quote I love, and haven’t found it, but I’ll paraphrase: I also wait for inspiration to write and I find it arrives every day at 9.
00 am when I sit down to write.

So you can do some or all of these things to write every day:
Good luck and let those words mount up
Jan It works
My friends say with admiration that I am able to do a lot, so I guess these methods stack up.
To renew your motivation every day you need something more than emotions, you need a reason.
My reason for writing is my identity.
I consider myself a writer and writers write.
Thus I feel compelled to write every single day.
I also love helping people and teaching and I perceive my writing as a way to help others to overcome their obstacles and fight their battles.
You need to examine yourself, what motivates you to write and, according to Zig's advice, renew this motive every day.
Writing is a numbers game
Shelby
mentioned he cannot force himself to write something worth reading.
But in my experience, and that of great bloggers who post regularly, this is not the best approach.
If you wait for inspiration to write something good, you may wait for a loooooong time.
If you constantly produce content every day, paying no attention to your moods, most of your output will probably be below your potential, but unavoidably you will also produce some quality material.
If your inspiration strikes once a week, you have one text a week.
If you write every day, you have 7 texts and 2-3 of them will be good enough.
“Motivation is what gets you started.
Habit is what keeps you going.
” – Jim Rohn
That's why you need a writing habit more than you need motivation.
Habit building tips
Approach it like developing any other habit – design it.
Pick one time of the day, I recommend mornings.
You have most energy and willpower in the morning, thus you have more creativity too.
Block your time, set aside an hour or even 10 minutes in your calendar.
Set reminders or alarms.
Have a topic for your writing session prepared in advance.
If you have an outline of what you want to write it's even better.
You won't stare at the blank page figuring out what to write about, you will start immediately.
Use all methods that help to establish a habit: write at the same time of day, write at the same place, create an initial ritual (I know more than a few writers who say a prayer or invocation before writing), have a clear ending point – finishing a chapter, a paragraph, writing for 15 minutes or 700 words – whatever suits you best.
Build a writing streak
Write every day, track your writing activity and build a consecutive chain of days on which you wrote.
Create a visual reminder of your progress: mark them on your wall calendar or in an application or on a piece of paper.
Building such a chain enhances your motivation.
The longer you build it the less likely you will be to abandon your writing habit.
Trust me, my chain is over 970 days long.
That's all.
Don't depend on motivation.
When it arrives, use it, and when it doesn't your habit will carry you on.

I think one of the biggest things that separates published authors from non-published authors is self-discipline.
Look, there’s no getting around the fact that if you don’t write the book…the book doesn’t get written.
It’s as simple as that.
Even veteran writers struggle with their motivation.
That’s the truth.
My least favorite part of this job is sitting down every day to write! But I do.
The best thing that I have found for myself is to write, per my last sentence, every single day.
No exceptions when I’m working on a manuscript.
In fact, because I come up with so many excuses and other things I’d rather be doing, I try to sit down and write over my morning coffee, that time when I’d probably otherwise be wasting an hour just screwing around online.
I get my kids out the door, sit down and bam.
Honestly, if I wait any longer, I dawdle throughout the day and then the idea of writing builds up to the point where it can feel excruciating.
I realize that not everyone has the schedule to do this, but the point is that you have to build it into your routine, just like you would exercise, until it simply becomes part of what you expect out of your day and yourself.
Also, give yourself a word count to hit each day and then once you do, give yourself permission to quit.
Depending on where I am in a manuscript, my goal is 1k-2k.
If I hit, say, 1001 words, I can literally get up from my chair and not return to the document until the following morning.
It’s all about knowing that there is a finish line.

The problem lies within your question: Motivation.
There’s no magic trick or secret sauce when it comes to sustained motivation.
Why? Because motivation waxes and wanes for everyone – even for superstars like Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Ray Dalio.
It’s not about motivation.
It’s about implementing daily habits that allow you to do whatever it is you want to do – in your case that’s writing – each day.
Set Aside a Defined Time
Like you, I strive to write every single day.
For me, I try to write in the morning, during my “golden hours” (the time that I am most productive).
I wake up at 5:00 a.
m.
– 5:30 a.
m.
every single weekday and write for about 60 – 90 minutes prior to making breakfast and getting ready for work.
Regardless of how the rest of my day goes, it’s one ‘win’ that I get out of the way.
It also frees me from thinking up excuses when I return home from work about how I am too tired or lazy to write in the evening.
Write Down 5 New Ideas
I stole this from James Altucher.
Altucher suggests that you jot down 10 new ideas every single day.
This will get your creative juices flowing and helps with writer’s block.
I love this idea because it excites me to start writing, which consequently lowers the chance of me pushing my daily habit of writing to the wayside.
Read a Variety of Subjects
Whether it’s on the subway, during lunch or before you fall asleep, you must incorporate reading into your daily routine.
You will not only become a better writer but also gather inspiration from unlikely places and draw innovative connections between various subjects.
This will, also, encourage you to write more.
Organize Your Day
Time blocking is a highly effective method to organize your day.
It allows you to concentrate on doing a single task within a specified time-frame.
I tend to do this during the weekday, and loosen things up on the weekend.
Here’s an example:
5:00 a.
m.
– 6:30 a.
m.
: write
6:30 a.
m.
– 6:45 a.
m.
: take out the dog
6:45 a.
m.
– 7:15 a.
m.
: make and eat breakfast
7:15 a.
m.
– 8:00 a.
m.
: shower/wash-up/get ready for work
8:00 am.
– 8:30 a.
m.
: commute to work
8:30 a.
m.
– 9:30 a.
m.
: respond to urgent work e-mails.

9:30 a.
m.
– 11:00 a.
m.
: schedule all meetings
11:00 a.
m.
– 1:00 p.
m.
: file work
1:00 p.
m.
– 2:00 p.
m.
: lunch
2:00 p.
m.
– 5:00 p.
m.
: return phone calls, administrative tasks, routine correspondence, other tasks that require low analytical skills
5:00 p.
m.
– 5:30 p.
m.
: commute home
5:30 p.
m.
– 6:30 p.
m.
: dinner
6:30 p.
m.
– 9:00 p.
m.
: unwind
9:00 p.
m.
– 10:00 p.
m.
: read

I’ve basically just shown you what an average day in the life of a lawyer (and aspiring writer) looks like.
Of course it varies from time to time, but you can see I’ve planned out almost everything.
So, even if I don’t feel like answering e-mails or interviewing a witness or writing at the crack of the dawn, it doesn’t matter – this is my schedule.
I’m not subject to the whims of my emotions.
These things have to be done within these times because I designed it that way.
If, over time, I find that this no longer suits me, I don’t hesitate to switch things up.
The point is not cramming as much things as possible within your day, but the opposite.
It’s to remove the variables that causes inconsistent results.
It’s to simplify the process and declutter your brain.
In summary, if you want to write every single day, you need to create small, but actionable, daily habits, as well as be disciplined enough to practice them.
This may mean declining social invitations.
Or watching that latest episode of your favourite show.
Or cutting the amount of time you’re aimlessly scrolling through social media.
But, I promise you, if you’re serious about writing, these actions and systems will keep you calm, focused and productive, regardless of how you’re feeling that day.

Words create sentences; sentences create paragraphs; sometimes paragraphs quicken and begin to breathe.

– Stephen King
If you’re climbing a mountain, you don’t stop after taking several steps upon realizing that there are still thousands of steps to the top.
You take it step by step, slowly gaining elevation and getting closer to your destination.

Writing books works the same way.
You focus on each word, each paragraph, each page, and each finished chapter.
One by one, you’re getting closer to finishing your first draft.
The most important strategy that has helped me become a bestselling self-help author is following a routine of writing a specific number of words a day.

In the past, I used to write 3,000 words a day and today, to make the process more sustainable, I write 1,000 words a day.
This way, if you know the approximate final length of your first draft (and you should know – it’s easier to write if you know your target total word count), you can easily calculate how many days of writing you have left.
Then it’s not a matter of motivation – it’s just a matter of consistency.
Do I always feel like writing? Not really.
However, since I have a routine in place, it keeps me going even when I find it hard to write.
Also, please remember that every writer goes through what you’re going through now.
Every single time I’m writing a new book, I go through the exact same thing when I’m approximately halfway done.
Reminding myself that within an x number of days I’ll be done helps me overcome the discouragement and keep writing.
Unfortunately there are no magic pills.
You just have to push through it and keep going – otherwise you won’t finish your book.
One year from now, you’ll regret giving up only to return to writing, get discouraged again, and give up again.
Avoid entering this cycle by vowing that no matter what happens, you’ll stick to your daily writing routine and see your project through.

Everyone knows that inspiration leads to motivation which leads to action; but unfortunately we're not always motivated and inspired—and shouldn’t depend on motivation and inspiration in order to act.
Mark Manson explains in his book The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, that people don't realize that action leads to inspiration which leads to motivation—which then leads to more action.
Mark Manson then tells this story:
“I recently heard a story about a novelist who had written over 70 novels.
Someone asked him how he was able to write so consistently and remain inspired and motivated every day, as writers are notorious for procrastination and for fighting through bouts of “writer’s block”.
The novelist said, “200 crappy words per day, that’s it.
” The idea is that if he forced himself to write 200 crappy words, more often than not, the act of writing would inspire him and before he knew it he’d have thousands down on the page.

Commit to writing every day! This is the one thing that you have control over.
You can't guarantee that you'll feel inspiration or motivation to write, but you can just sit down and write.
The inspiration and motivation will follow.

Step 1: Remember this quote now and forever, “Inspiration is for amateurs.
The rest of us just show up and do the work.
” – Chuck Close.
Who do you want to be? A weak ass amateur or somebody who actually gets shit done?
Step 2: That said, get off your ass.
Get in front of the computer, notebook or typewriter.
You MUST fight the feelings that are going against you.
You must find the strength to power through the laziness, demotivation or fear.
This is something only you can do.
No one else can.
Step 3: Write until you get in the zone.
You’ll know when you’re in the zone.
It’s pure flow.
It gets easier now.
That’s all.
You’d have written something by now.
Hidden secret step: Don’t worry about hitting publish or if it is good enough.
Polishing up your piece can be done anytime later with a refreshed mind.
Edit only after you take a break.
This step is to also ensure you stop thinking ahead of yourself, for your only job is to write, not worry about the result in terms of going viral, making money or whatever.
Then publish when you want.
It’s up to you.
At least by then, you’d have written something.
Take pride in that.
If you want more details on how to write blog articles, check out this over
regards,
Sibi S

You have to decide how important writing is to you.
There are many ways to do this but I’ve found that Benjamin P Hardy, a writer on Medium has an effective exercise.
I used his exercise to decide what I wanted to do with my writing, so hopefully it will help you too.
You need clarity as to why you even want to write to motivate yourself to write.
Exercise: Answer this question
What about writing is important to me? Answer the question with the first thing that comes to your mind.
Then ask what about [the answer to the first question] is important to me?
Then ask yourself what about [the answer to the question above] is important to me?
Mr.
Hardy suggests doing this seven times.
After you complete this step, why you want to write will become clear, or you’ll find out that it’s something else you actually want to do – not writing.
Remind yourself daily why writing is important to you (this will keep you motivated).
More than likely you’ll find that you want to write for a bigger purpose than just writing a book or an article.
There’s why to what you want to do.
For example, let’s say you find out that you want to write to teach bullies how to curb their anger because you know someone who killed themselves because of bullying.
The why is stopping the effects of bullying by going to the source – the bully.
That’s what you’d really want to do and writing is the way for you to do it.
Next you could write out a plan for your writing to reach your goals – start a blog, write a book, create a social media campaign, etc.
Schedule writing into your day.
Block off a specific time slot and dedicate it to writing.
Join writing groups on Facebook or LinkedIn, join writing challenges, seek out writers on Twitter.
Watch motivational videos, and/or authortube videos (writers who give writing advice and talk about their writing journey).
I hope this helps.

Start a Blog.
This is what I did and it is by far the best thing ever, even though it was a bumpy road, and I did not produce a post a day like I planned to, right now I am and even more so I am writing a book and answering questions on Quora daily.
The best way is to write every single day and to get it out into the world!
You will never improve by writing for yourself, and you will never be motivated if you do not get some kind of feedback.
The motivation will come in time as you write more, at the beginning there will not be a lot.
That is okay.
That is why you should start a blog and hold yourself to producing something every day.
Sooner or later, the passion and motivation will find you!
It all starts with one blog post a day, and from there amazing things will happen.

If you cannot honestly answer these 5 questions on writing, chances are you will never find the motivation to write everyday.

Why do you want to write?
What is your dream?
How do you think you're going to achieve this dream?
How much time and work are you willing to put in on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis?
What are you willing to sacrifice in order to achieve this dream?
All of these questions need to be considered when looking to write.
Writers are a unique breed.
We write because we have a voice, deep down in our soul telling us that there are a plethora of words that need to be shared with the world.
We understand that language- more specifically written language- is the optimal tool in understanding the world around you and sharing that understanding.
We see written language as a means for sharing ideas.
We see written language as a means to inspire.
We see written language as a sacred craft.
I consider myself a writer.
Furthermore, I consider myself a good writer.

I have a calling every morning when I get up that screams, WRITE! It's like a Banshee in the back of my head that careens her way through to my fingertips.
I get anxiety when I don't write.
I think about reworking articles when I should be focused on the conversation I'm having.
When I ask myself the above questions- I can clearly see how to motivate myself to write.
All the answers lead to one simple answer:
I'm going to die, this is something that I'm good at, and I must do it.

Plain and simple.
Let's unpack the questions:
Why do I want to write?
“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.
” -Maya Angelou

It feels good.
I lose myself when I'm deep in writing.
I believe I'm good at it.
It helps me understand myself.
It helps me understand the world around me.
What is your dream?
“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.
” -Winston Churchill

My dream is to expand human consciousness through writing.
It is to write multiple pieces of work and have that work published.
Further, it is to have that published work flourish in sales and help me sustain a health income with it.
I dream to inspire people- like many other individuals.
I believe there is an energy that I gravitate towards in the writing community.
I have learned so much from the writings of others.
I have learned from Ancient Emperors.
I have learned from once homeless drugs addicts who all have chosen to share their stories.
How do you think you're going to achieve this dream?
“There is nothing to writing.
All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.
-Ernest Hemingway
Plain and simple- by writing.
I know that in order to get better at math- you practice math.
I know that in order to be a professional basketball player- you practice basketball.
In order for the words that are always flying around in my brain to become real and alive on the page- I must write.
I have also networked with countless people in the publishing industry and I have mentors that help me progress through my work.
At the barebones level, however, one needs to write in order to become a writer.

How much time and work are you willing to put in on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis?
“Tomorrow may be hell, but today was a good writing day, and on the good writing days nothing else matters.
” -Neil Gaiman

After reading many books on following a creative pursuit- most specifically writing.
I have come to terms with treating the craft as an everyday pursuit.
There is basic arithmetic that will help us understand what it will take to write 1 book for instance.
There are 365 days in a year.
With that, there are 52 weeks that can segment out those 365 days at 7 days a week.
Let's start a tad smaller than writing “every single day” and let's just write 5 days a week- similar to any normal working schedule.
That give us 5 days/week X 52 weeks = 260 working, writing days.
So, if we were to write just 1 page per working day, we would have 260 pages.
That in itself is a full book's worth of pages.
Now, one could shorten their week in half and write double the amount of pages per working day and still come up with 260.
You can work the math over and over and come up with a fully written book in a given amount of time.
All it requires is a bit of structure and perseverance to write.
What are you willing to sacrifice in order to achieve this dream?
“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.
No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.
” -Robert Frost

Writing is lonely- plain and simple.
I have sacrificed a lot of human contact and immediate joy and exciting stimuli in the pursuit of writing.
At first it was hard.
There are times in social situations I feel I have become cold and irritable.
I am not as bubbly as perhaps I used to be.
I am listening to the call of something greater than immediate pleasure, however.
Like I said in a previous question, I am looking to expand the consciousness of humanity and I am looking to do that through writing.
That means:
No more empty nights at the bar with friends.
No more mindless two-hour long phone calls to complain about so-and-so.
No more impromptu lunch dates.
No more wasteful yet pleasure filled multimedia bingeing.
And you know what?
Once you cut all that auxiliary static from you life- your writing and life become more focused and clear.
You begin to uncover your mission.

To Conclude:
I don't believe there is a magic trick that will help you tap into some Godly stream of motivation.
The motivation needed to write comes from uncovering the deeply rooted reasons why you think you should write in the first place.
One needs to identify why they have chosen this pursuit.
One needs to uncover how they are going to navigate these dreams.
What steps are they going to take to get to the promised land?
One needs to recognize how it can be isolating at times and how they can overcome such isolation.
One needs to develop their long term ideal goals.
There is no magic trick in finding the motivation to write.
Writers write, plain and simple.
You need to discover if you truly are a writer.
If you were put on this planet to share your gift of using the tool of written language to help inspire, motivate, encourage, define, share, develop, create and produce work that will help humanity as a whole- you'll have no trouble in finding the motivation to write.

(Photo Credit:
It works
My friends say with admiration that I am able to do a lot, so I guess these methods stack up.
To renew your motivation every day you need something more than emotions, you need a reason.
My reason for writing is my identity.
I consider myself a writer and writers write.
Thus I feel compelled to write every single day.
I also love helping people and teaching and I perceive my writing as a way to help others to overcome their obstacles and fight their battles.
You need to examine yourself, what motivates you to write and, according to Zig's advice, renew this motive every day.
Writing is a numbers game
Shelby mentioned he cannot force himself to write something worth reading.
But in my experience, and that of great bloggers who post regularly, this is not the best approach.
If you wait for inspiration to write something good, you may wait for a loooooong time.
If you constantly produce content every day, paying no attention to your moods, most of your output will probably be below your potential, but unavoidably you will also produce some quality material.
If your inspiration strikes once a week, you have one text a week.
If you write every day, you have 7 texts and 2-3 of them will be good enough.
“Motivation is what gets you started.
Habit is what keeps you going.
” – Jim Rohn
That's why you need a writing habit more than you need motivation.
Habit building tips
Approach it like developing any other habit – design it.
Pick one time of the day, I recommend mornings.
You have most energy and willpower in the morning, thus you have more creativity too.
Block your time, set aside an hour or even 10 minutes in your calendar.
Set reminders or alarms.
Have a topic for your writing session prepared in advance.
If you have an outline of what you want to write it's even better.
You won't stare at the blank page figuring out what to write about, you will start immediately.
Use all methods that help to establish a habit: write at the same time of day, write at the same place, create an initial ritual (I know more than a few writers who say a prayer or invocation before writing), have a clear ending point – finishing a chapter, a paragraph, writing for 15 minutes or 700 words – whatever suits you best.
Build a writing streak
Write every day, track your writing activity and build a consecutive chain of days on which you wrote.
Create a visual reminder of your progress: mark them on your wall calendar or in an application or on a piece of paper.
Building such a chain enhances your motivation.
The longer you build it the less likely you will be to abandon your writing habit.
Trust me, my chain is over 970 days long.
That's all.
Don't depend on motivation.
When it arrives, use it, and when it doesn't your habit will carry you on.

I think one of the biggest things that separates published authors from non-published authors is self-discipline.
Look, there’s no getting around the fact that if you don’t write the book…the book doesn’t get written.
It’s as simple as that.
Even veteran writers struggle with their motivation.
That’s the truth.
My least favorite part of this job is sitting down every day to write! But I do.
The best thing that I have found for myself is to write, per my last sentence, every single day.
No exceptions when I’m working on a manuscript.
In fact, because I come up with so many excuses and other things I’d rather be doing, I try to sit down and write over my morning coffee, that time when I’d probably otherwise be wasting an hour just screwing around online.
I get my kids out the door, sit down and bam.
Honestly, if I wait any longer, I dawdle throughout the day and then the idea of writing builds up to the point where it can feel excruciating.
I realize that not everyone has the schedule to do this, but the point is that you have to build it into your routine, just like you would exercise, until it simply becomes part of what you expect out of your day and yourself.
Also, give yourself a word count to hit each day and then once you do, give yourself permission to quit.
Depending on where I am in a manuscript, my goal is 1k-2k.
If I hit, say, 1001 words, I can literally get up from my chair and not return to the document until the following morning.
It’s all about knowing that there is a finish line.

The problem lies within your question: Motivation.
There’s no magic trick or secret sauce when it comes to sustained motivation.
Why? Because motivation waxes and wanes for everyone – even for superstars like Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Ray Dalio.
It’s not about motivation.
It’s about implementing daily habits that allow you to do whatever it is you want to do – in your case that’s writing – each day.
Set Aside a Defined Time
Like you, I strive to write every single day.
For me, I try to write in the morning, during my “golden hours” (the time that I am most productive).
I wake up at 5:00 a.
m.
– 5:30 a.
m.
every single weekday and write for about 60 – 90 minutes prior to making breakfast and getting ready for work.
Regardless of how the rest of my day goes, it’s one ‘win’ that I get out of the way.
It also frees me from thinking up excuses when I return home from work about how I am too tired or lazy to write in the evening.
Write Down 5 New Ideas
I stole this from James Altucher.
Altucher suggests that you jot down 10 new ideas every single day.
This will get your creative juices flowing and helps with writer’s block.
I love this idea because it excites me to start writing, which consequently lowers the chance of me pushing my daily habit of writing to the wayside.
Read a Variety of Subjects
Whether it’s on the subway, during lunch or before you fall asleep, you must incorporate reading into your daily routine.
You will not only become a better writer but also gather inspiration from unlikely places and draw innovative connections between various subjects.
This will, also, encourage you to write more.
Organize Your Day
Time blocking is a highly effective method to organize your day.
It allows you to concentrate on doing a single task within a specified time-frame.
I tend to do this during the weekday, and loosen things up on the weekend.
Here’s an example:
5:00 a.
m.
– 6:30 a.
m.
: write
6:30 a.
m.
– 6:45 a.
m.
: take out the dog
6:45 a.
m.
– 7:15 a.
m.
: make and eat breakfast
7:15 a.
m.
– 8:00 a.
m.
: shower/wash-up/get ready for work
8:00 am.
– 8:30 a.
m.
: commute to work
8:30 a.
m.
– 9:30 a.
m.
: respond to urgent work e-mails.

9:30 a.
m.
– 11:00 a.
m.
: schedule all meetings
11:00 a.
m.
– 1:00 p.
m.
: file work
1:00 p.
m.
– 2:00 p.
m.
: lunch
2:00 p.
m.
– 5:00 p.
m.
: return phone calls, administrative tasks, routine correspondence, other tasks that require low analytical skills
5:00 p.
m.
– 5:30 p.
m.
: commute home
5:30 p.
m.
– 6:30 p.
m.
: dinner
6:30 p.
m.
– 9:00 p.
m.
: unwind
9:00 p.
m.
– 10:00 p.
m.
: read

I’ve basically just shown you what an average day in the life of a lawyer (and aspiring writer) looks like.
Of course it varies from time to time, but you can see I’ve planned out almost everything.
So, even if I don’t feel like answering e-mails or interviewing a witness or writing at the crack of the dawn, it doesn’t matter – this is my schedule.
I’m not subject to the whims of my emotions.
These things have to be done within these times because I designed it that way.
If, over time, I find that this no longer suits me, I don’t hesitate to switch things up.
The point is not cramming as much things as possible within your day, but the opposite.
It’s to remove the variables that causes inconsistent results.
It’s to simplify the process and declutter your brain.
In summary, if you want to write every single day, you need to create small, but actionable, daily habits, as well as be disciplined enough to practice them.
This may mean declining social invitations.
Or watching that latest episode of your favourite show.
Or cutting the amount of time you’re aimlessly scrolling through social media.
But, I promise you, if you’re serious about writing, these actions and systems will keep you calm, focused and productive, regardless of how you’re feeling that day.

Words create sentences; sentences create paragraphs; sometimes paragraphs quicken and begin to breathe.

– Stephen King
If you’re climbing a mountain, you don’t stop after taking several steps upon realizing that there are still thousands of steps to the top.
You take it step by step, slowly gaining elevation and getting closer to your destination.

Writing books works the same way.
You focus on each word, each paragraph, each page, and each finished chapter.
One by one, you’re getting closer to finishing your first draft.
The most important strategy that has helped me become a bestselling self-help author is following a routine of writing a specific number of words a day.

In the past, I used to write 3,000 words a day and today, to make the process more sustainable, I write 1,000 words a day.
This way, if you know the approximate final length of your first draft (and you should know – it’s easier to write if you know your target total word count), you can easily calculate how many days of writing you have left.
Then it’s not a matter of motivation – it’s just a matter of consistency.
Do I always feel like writing? Not really.
However, since I have a routine in place, it keeps me going even when I find it hard to write.
Also, please remember that every writer goes through what you’re going through now.
Every single time I’m writing a new book, I go through the exact same thing when I’m approximately halfway done.
Reminding myself that within an x number of days I’ll be done helps me overcome the discouragement and keep writing.
Unfortunately there are no magic pills.
You just have to push through it and keep going – otherwise you won’t finish your book.
One year from now, you’ll regret giving up only to return to writing, get discouraged again, and give up again.
Avoid entering this cycle by vowing that no matter what happens, you’ll stick to your daily writing routine and see your project through.

When Michelangelo was painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling, he wrote a poem about how much he hated it.
He complained about his aching body, about the paint dripping on his face.
He complained about the nagging thoughts he had while he was up there all alone for four years.
He even complained that he was in the wrong place, because he didn’t think he was a painter.
He was actually a sculptor, and when the pope asked him, he only agreed to paint the ceiling when the pope agreed that he could “do as he liked.

How many of us does this story describe?
I can tell you from personal experience that I have felt many times just as Michelangelo did.
I’ve complained sometimes that nothing is working out.
I’ve cried sometimes when everything went wrong, when it seemed like nothing I did was working.
I’ve become discouraged when I fell into the trap of looking at what others were doing and comparing my work to theirs, and wondering why I wasn’t seeing the same success.
How many of us listen to that nagging voice in our heads that reminds us of our aching body, the long hours, and tells us we’re in the wrong place because, “you’re not a writer.

It’s at those times that I need to remind myself: “Great! I don’t want to be a writer.
I want to do what I like and get paid for it!”
And while I don’t think I could paint anything quite as noteworthy as the Sistine Chapel, I feel like I can relate to Michelangelo when he finally stepped down from that scaffolding for the final time and admired his work.
After a particularly stressful year, or a grueling writing project of my own, I always look back with an overwhelming sense of pride and think to myself, “I really did that?”
But what’s the key to getting to that point?
Doing what we like!
So, what do we like? We’ve all decided to break into writing in some way because we all have something in common.
We believe in creating worlds.
Telling stories.
Exploring new ideas.
Isn’t that what we like?
Then who cares how you do it?
Here’s the trick to making money while doing what you like: write with purpose and passion.

Writing with purpose and passion is what will carry you through the hard times, and motivate you to try and improve on what you’ve already done.
Let’s tackle this in two parts: the purpose part first, and the passion part second.
We all need a purpose to do what we do.
It’s what gets us out of bed in the morning.
Some people call it your “why.

It’s a bit of a cliché, but there is another layer much deeper, a purpose that only you know is there.
It has to be something deep within you.
Because the world is going to test your purpose, it’s going to tempt you and test you until you prove you’re not going to waver from your purpose one way or another.
Even your wife or husband is going to test you, they’re going to ask you “are you really going to start writing again? You haven’t made money in six months and you’re going to spend the whole weekend writing again?”
That isn’t them being negative, they’re testing you to see “are you truly fixated on becoming successful?”
And if you hold the course long enough, ten or even fifteen times, they will learn to sit back with patience and trust.
They will trust you that you’re not going to deviate when other problems and storms happen.
When hard times come that force you to look at yourself and say, “Wow, this isn’t working.

Do you quit?
And your purpose is going to be different for everybody.
The reason why this is important is because:
A purpose will remind you of why you work so hard, why you sacrifice.
If you’re writing toward something greater, something important, the sacrifices you make will be made easier.
This helps you understand the impact that each action you take has on your goal.
If you’ve ever sat at your desk, or lay awake in bed at night wondering why you’re doing what you’re doing, it’s because you’ve lost focus on your purpose.
For example: Why am I spending so much time creating this fictional world? Why am I staying up so late to finish these chapters?
So, I can create a world someone would want to explore? So I’m just as satisfied with my own work as if someone else had written it? To share with the world what’s inside my head effectively? Maybe it’s just to make money?
Sometimes, we do fail, though.
The temptation is to always have a “plan B” or a fallback plan.
Here’s my advice: your “plan B” should always be “make plan A work” Otherwise when times get hard, you’re going to fall back onto plan B, and plan A will be left behind and forgotten.
The road to mediocrity is paved with “plan B’s”
It’s going to be hard, we’re going to fall short, but as long as we keep striving, we cannot fail.
Trust me, I can relate.
I’ve lost a lot of it on this journey, but at the same time I found myself.
I found my purpose.
And that’s what carries me every single day moving forward.
And if you ask me “was it worth it?” I can tell you right now, I can look myself in the mirror and say “yes, it’s been worth it.

Whatever your purpose is, it’s for you to figure out.
Once you have your purpose, though, the next thing you need is passion.
If we think of your purpose as the “why” then your passion is the “how.

To be very cliché, the dictionary describes passion as: “a strong and barely controllable emotion.

That needs to be us, when working on our writing, no matter what we’re doing.
We need to be strong and barely controllable.
We should jump out of bed excited for what the day may bring.
What new ideas may pop into our heads.
Others should be impressed with our drive and excitement surrounding this opportunity.
They should feel it in our writing.
People love passion.
We love watching passionate things and other passionate people.
It is an undeniable truth that someone will not leave what they have for something worse.
If they’re passionate about their lifestyle, their own book, or whatever it is, your passion must beat theirs!
Every conversation, every meeting and phone call can be seen as a battlefield of passions.
An infectious passion will persuade people to think, “You know, maybe there is something to this writer after all, how else could someone be so passionate about their writing?”
Now, I know what you’re thinking, “How can I possibly be passionate about everything I do, especially during the bad times? I don’t normally jump out of bed, why would I start jumping out of bed to slog through footnotes and research?”
Now that’s it, ladies and gentlemen, that’s the question that separates those who are successful, from those who are not.
It’s the difference between those who read books like How to win friends and influence people and think “Oh, that was a good book.
” And those who stop reading halfway through because they’re excited to actually test out what is says.
It’s why most books die in the author’s head.
It’s why the number of people who show up to football tryouts is significantly more than those at the end of two-a-day season.
They simply are not passionate about it.
Do some people enjoy two-a-days? Probably some crazy ones do, but I would say most do not, but that doesn’t mean they don’t pour their passion into it.
They’re uncontrollable.
Nothing will persuade them to skip their daily torture.
Even though Michelangelo hated painting the ceiling, there is no denying that he was passionate about it.
He was there every day for four years, making sure every brush stroke was perfect, every color vibrant.
Nobody can argue that he was not passionate.
You’d be surprised that some of us hate the actual process of writing.
Many of us are very bad at writing dialogue.
A lot of us don’t like editing our own work for whatever reason! But we do it, and you can tell when people do it passionately.

Seeing your work finally published, being sent out into the public, that’s when I feel passion.
An uncontrollable emotion.
It boils up inside you and almost forces you to smile, to dream big, to make lofty goals.
You can’t contain it.
Now, that’s all easy to say while we’re here, singing koombaya, and chanting together in inspirational Quora posts.
But what happens when you wake up next week all by yourself, and you make that phone-call to your friend because of your excitement and they say, “Are you kidding me? Are you one of those people?”
How will you react? What do you do? Are you still passionate?
Just writing doesn’t make you passionate, you must make it passionate.
(in other words, don’t phone-in your writing.
Don’t just try to go from plot point A to plot point B!) If you wait around for a love of writing to appear suddenly in your life, you will be left waiting forever.
That’s not how it works!
There comes a point where we must pick up our brush and paint, instead of waiting for the desire to paint.
It’s easy to look at so-and-so and say “I want that.
” But they picked up the brush, they did the meetings, they did the webinars, they did the long nights and seminars, they did the self-development, they did everything they had to do until the world trusted them and their passion
There must have been a dozen reasons for every single one of us not to write, but our passion makes us do it.
We are uncontrollable.
If you write with purpose and passion, you will be successful.
I guarantee it.
It won’t be tomorrow, it won’t be next week, but it will happen.
There is nothing anybody else can do that would be able to stop you.
It may sound hard, and the hard times definitely come.
But if you’re focused on your purpose, and you pour your passion into it at every step.
You will be surprised at how much you can accomplish.
When you go home after a long day, when the hype fades from an inspirational post, or a good day of writing, or a good message from a publisher, are you going to sit around and talk about it, or actually go out and do it again?
What are you going to do to pick your paintbrush up?

Every year I started a blog, only to delete it a month later because I wasn’t getting enough of anything.
I always compared the number of likes I got for a post with other popular writers and set myself a standard where I felt my content was good only if I reached a certain number.
I was trapped in a vicious cycle and surrendered myself to the external environment to influence my emotions and words.

I became vividly aware of this cycle when I posted a poem and waited for the likes to barge in.
Two days later when I read the poem, I was shocked.
As much as I’d felt the poem, I had written it in the intention of getting more likes and views rather than enjoying it.
That’s when I took a break.
It’s been a month and I haven’t been able to write.
The infamous writer’s block.
After a month of lazy complaints and unmotivated attitude, I realized I’ll never be motivated enough to write.

I will have moments where I get sudden inspiration and write an amazing piece with intense motivation, but I also know it’s going to be rare.
Motivation is dangerous to rely on when it comes to writing.
As weird as this sounds, your want to write must solely rely on your want to write.
Motivation comes and goes, what should always remain are the words.
I recently came across a Prathyusha

Everyone knows that inspiration leads to motivation which leads to action; but unfortunately we're not always motivated and inspired—and shouldn’t depend on motivation and inspiration in order to act.
Mark Manson explains in his book The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, that people don't realize that action leads to inspiration which leads to motivation—which then leads to more action.
Mark Manson then tells this story:
“I recently heard a story about a novelist who had written over 70 novels.
Someone asked him how he was able to write so consistently and remain inspired and motivated every day, as writers are notorious for procrastination and for fighting through bouts of “writer’s block”.
The novelist said, “200 crappy words per day, that’s it.
” The idea is that if he forced himself to write 200 crappy words, more often than not, the act of writing would inspire him and before he knew it he’d have thousands down on the page.

Commit to writing every day! This is the one thing that you have control over.
You can't guarantee that you'll feel inspiration or motivation to write, but you can just sit down and write.
The inspiration and motivation will follow.

Step 1: Remember this quote now and forever, “Inspiration is for amateurs.
The rest of us just show up and do the work.
” – Chuck Close.
Who do you want to be? A weak ass amateur or somebody who actually gets shit done?
Step 2: That said, get off your ass.
Get in front of the computer, notebook or typewriter.
You MUST fight the feelings that are going against you.
You must find the strength to power through the laziness, demotivation or fear.
This is something only you can do.
No one else can.
Step 3: Write until you get in the zone.
You’ll know when you’re in the zone.
It’s pure flow.
It gets easier now.
That’s all.
You’d have written something by now.
Hidden secret step: Don’t worry about hitting publish or if it is good enough.
Polishing up your piece can be done anytime later with a refreshed mind.
Edit only after you take a break.
This step is to also ensure you stop thinking ahead of yourself, for your only job is to write, not worry about the result in terms of going viral, making money or whatever.
Then publish when you want.
It’s up to you.
At least by then, you’d have written something.
Take pride in that.
If you want more details on how to write blog articles, check out this over
regards,
Sibi S

You have to decide how important writing is to you.
There are many ways to do this but I’ve found that Benjamin P Hardy, a writer on Medium has an effective exercise.
I used his exercise to decide what I wanted to do with my writing, so hopefully it will help you too.
You need clarity as to why you even want to write to motivate yourself to write.
Exercise: Answer this question
What about writing is important to me? Answer the question with the first thing that comes to your mind.
Then ask what about [the answer to the first question] is important to me?
Then ask yourself what about [the answer to the question above] is important to me?
Mr.
Hardy suggests doing this seven times.
After you complete this step, why you want to write will become clear, or you’ll find out that it’s something else you actually want to do – not writing.
Remind yourself daily why writing is important to you (this will keep you motivated).
More than likely you’ll find that you want to write for a bigger purpose than just writing a book or an article.
There’s why to what you want to do.
For example, let’s say you find out that you want to write to teach bullies how to curb their anger because you know someone who killed themselves because of bullying.
The why is stopping the effects of bullying by going to the source – the bully.
That’s what you’d really want to do and writing is the way for you to do it.
Next you could write out a plan for your writing to reach your goals – start a blog, write a book, create a social media campaign, etc.
Schedule writing into your day.
Block off a specific time slot and dedicate it to writing.
Join writing groups on Facebook or LinkedIn, join writing challenges, seek out writers on Twitter.
Watch motivational videos, and/or authortube videos (writers who give writing advice and talk about their writing journey).
I hope this helps.

Start a Blog.
This is what I did and it is by far the best thing ever, even though it was a bumpy road, and I did not produce a post a day like I planned to, right now I am and even more so I am writing a book and answering questions on Quora daily.
The best way is to write every single day and to get it out into the world!
You will never improve by writing for yourself, and you will never be motivated if you do not get some kind of feedback.
The motivation will come in time as you write more, at the beginning there will not be a lot.
That is okay.
That is why you should start a blog and hold yourself to producing something every day.
Sooner or later, the passion and motivation will find you!
It all starts with one blog post a day, and from there amazing things will happen.

How can I stay motivated to write?

Do something every day to make your writing habit stick! Writing, just like any other activity we work on, is a matter of practice.
The more we do it, the better we get at it, and the more confident we feel.
Then, once we start feeling good about it, we’re more likely to keep doing it.
Start today.
Incorporate a few small daily practices that can boost your motivation to write.
Here are 5 ideas:
#1.
Increase your focus on what’s most important to do today with one question first thing in the morning: What is the
one thing I am committed to completing today?
#2.
Set goals for your work.

#3.
Schedule your day into 2 hour time blocks.

#4.
Feed your brain.

#5.
Delay gratification.

Here are a few ideas on brain food that might be interesting to you:

Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.
– Stephen King

“Just write every day of your life.
Read intensely.
Then see what happens.
Most of my friends who are put on that diet have very pleasant careers.
” – Ray Bradbury

Writing is like a muscle.
It can be developed by routine and expectation.
If you set an intention to write each day, make it a priority and do it consistently, you will be amazed by the progress you make.
I have searched for another quote I love, and haven’t found it, but I’ll paraphrase: I also wait for inspiration to write and I find it arrives every day at 9.
00 am when I sit down to write.

So you can do some or all of these things to write every day:
Good luck and let those words mount up
Jan
It works
My friends say with admiration that I am able to do a lot, so I guess these methods stack up.
To renew your motivation every day you need something more than emotions, you need a reason.
My reason for writing is my identity.
I consider myself a writer and writers write.
Thus I feel compelled to write every single day.
I also love helping people and teaching and I perceive my writing as a way to help others to overcome their obstacles and fight their battles.
You need to examine yourself, what motivates you to write and, according to Zig's advice, renew this motive every day.
Writing is a numbers game
Shelby mentioned he cannot force himself to write something worth reading.
But in my experience, and that of great bloggers who post regularly, this is not the best approach.
If you wait for inspiration to write something good, you may wait for a loooooong time.
If you constantly produce content every day, paying no attention to your moods, most of your output will probably be below your potential, but unavoidably you will also produce some quality material.
If your inspiration strikes once a week, you have one text a week.
If you write every day, you have 7 texts and 2-3 of them will be good enough.
“Motivation is what gets you started.
Habit is what keeps you going.
” – Jim Rohn
That's why you need a writing habit more than you need motivation.
Habit building tips
Approach it like developing any other habit – design it.
Pick one time of the day, I recommend mornings.
You have most energy and willpower in the morning, thus you have more creativity too.
Block your time, set aside an hour or even 10 minutes in your calendar.
Set reminders or alarms.
Have a topic for your writing session prepared in advance.
If you have an outline of what you want to write it's even better.
You won't stare at the blank page figuring out what to write about, you will start immediately.
Use all methods that help to establish a habit: write at the same time of day, write at the same place, create an initial ritual (I know more than a few writers who say a prayer or invocation before writing), have a clear ending point – finishing a chapter, a paragraph, writing for 15 minutes or 700 words – whatever suits you best.
Build a writing streak
Write every day, track your writing activity and build a consecutive chain of days on which you wrote.
Create a visual reminder of your progress: mark them on your wall calendar or in an application or on a piece of paper.
Building such a chain enhances your motivation.
The longer you build it the less likely you will be to abandon your writing habit.
Trust me, my chain is over 970 days long.
That's all.
Don't depend on motivation.
When it arrives, use it, and when it doesn't your habit will carry you on.

I think one of the biggest things that separates published authors from non-published authors is self-discipline.
Look, there’s no getting around the fact that if you don’t write the book…the book doesn’t get written.
It’s as simple as that.
Even veteran writers struggle with their motivation.
That’s the truth.
My least favorite part of this job is sitting down every day to write! But I do.
The best thing that I have found for myself is to write, per my last sentence, every single day.
No exceptions when I’m working on a manuscript.
In fact, because I come up with so many excuses and other things I’d rather be doing, I try to sit down and write over my morning coffee, that time when I’d probably otherwise be wasting an hour just screwing around online.
I get my kids out the door, sit down and bam.
Honestly, if I wait any longer, I dawdle throughout the day and then the idea of writing builds up to the point where it can feel excruciating.
I realize that not everyone has the schedule to do this, but the point is that you have to build it into your routine, just like you would exercise, until it simply becomes part of what you expect out of your day and yourself.
Also, give yourself a word count to hit each day and then once you do, give yourself permission to quit.
Depending on where I am in a manuscript, my goal is 1k-2k.
If I hit, say, 1001 words, I can literally get up from my chair and not return to the document until the following morning.
It’s all about knowing that there is a finish line.

The problem lies within your question: Motivation.
There’s no magic trick or secret sauce when it comes to sustained motivation.
Why? Because motivation waxes and wanes for everyone – even for superstars like Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Ray Dalio.
It’s not about motivation.
It’s about implementing daily habits that allow you to do whatever it is you want to do – in your case that’s writing – each day.
Set Aside a Defined Time
Like you, I strive to write every single day.
For me, I try to write in the morning, during my “golden hours” (the time that I am most productive).
I wake up at 5:00 a.
m.
– 5:30 a.
m.
every single weekday and write for about 60 – 90 minutes prior to making breakfast and getting ready for work.
Regardless of how the rest of my day goes, it’s one ‘win’ that I get out of the way.
It also frees me from thinking up excuses when I return home from work about how I am too tired or lazy to write in the evening.
Write Down 5 New Ideas
I stole this from James Altucher.
Altucher suggests that you jot down 10 new ideas every single day.
This will get your creative juices flowing and helps with writer’s block.
I love this idea because it excites me to start writing, which consequently lowers the chance of me pushing my daily habit of writing to the wayside.
Read a Variety of Subjects
Whether it’s on the subway, during lunch or before you fall asleep, you must incorporate reading into your daily routine.
You will not only become a better writer but also gather inspiration from unlikely places and draw innovative connections between various subjects.
This will, also, encourage you to write more.
Organize Your Day
Time blocking is a highly effective method to organize your day.
It allows you to concentrate on doing a single task within a specified time-frame.
I tend to do this during the weekday, and loosen things up on the weekend.
Here’s an example:
5:00 a.
m.
– 6:30 a.
m.
: write
6:30 a.
m.
– 6:45 a.
m.
: take out the dog
6:45 a.
m.
– 7:15 a.
m.
: make and eat breakfast
7:15 a.
m.
– 8:00 a.
m.
: shower/wash-up/get ready for work
8:00 am.
– 8:30 a.
m.
: commute to work
8:30 a.
m.
– 9:30 a.
m.
: respond to urgent work e-mails.

9:30 a.
m.
– 11:00 a.
m.
: schedule all meetings
11:00 a.
m.
– 1:00 p.
m.
: file work
1:00 p.
m.
– 2:00 p.
m.
: lunch
2:00 p.
m.
– 5:00 p.
m.
: return phone calls, administrative tasks, routine correspondence, other tasks that require low analytical skills
5:00 p.
m.
– 5:30 p.
m.
: commute home
5:30 p.
m.
– 6:30 p.
m.
: dinner
6:30 p.
m.
– 9:00 p.
m.
: unwind
9:00 p.
m.
– 10:00 p.
m.
: read

I’ve basically just shown you what an average day in the life of a lawyer (and aspiring writer) looks like.
Of course it varies from time to time, but you can see I’ve planned out almost everything.
So, even if I don’t feel like answering e-mails or interviewing a witness or writing at the crack of the dawn, it doesn’t matter – this is my schedule.
I’m not subject to the whims of my emotions.
These things have to be done within these times because I designed it that way.
If, over time, I find that this no longer suits me, I don’t hesitate to switch things up.
The point is not cramming as much things as possible within your day, but the opposite.
It’s to remove the variables that causes inconsistent results.
It’s to simplify the process and declutter your brain.
In summary, if you want to write every single day, you need to create small, but actionable, daily habits, as well as be disciplined enough to practice them.
This may mean declining social invitations.
Or watching that latest episode of your favourite show.
Or cutting the amount of time you’re aimlessly scrolling through social media.
But, I promise you, if you’re serious about writing, these actions and systems will keep you calm, focused and productive, regardless of how you’re feeling that day.

Words create sentences; sentences create paragraphs; sometimes paragraphs quicken and begin to breathe.

– Stephen King
If you’re climbing a mountain, you don’t stop after taking several steps upon realizing that there are still thousands of steps to the top.
You take it step by step, slowly gaining elevation and getting closer to your destination.

Writing books works the same way.
You focus on each word, each paragraph, each page, and each finished chapter.
One by one, you’re getting closer to finishing your first draft.
The most important strategy that has helped me become a bestselling self-help author is following a routine of writing a specific number of words a day.

In the past, I used to write 3,000 words a day and today, to make the process more sustainable, I write 1,000 words a day.
This way, if you know the approximate final length of your first draft (and you should know – it’s easier to write if you know your target total word count), you can easily calculate how many days of writing you have left.
Then it’s not a matter of motivation – it’s just a matter of consistency.
Do I always feel like writing? Not really.
However, since I have a routine in place, it keeps me going even when I find it hard to write.
Also, please remember that every writer goes through what you’re going through now.
Every single time I’m writing a new book, I go through the exact same thing when I’m approximately halfway done.
Reminding myself that within an x number of days I’ll be done helps me overcome the discouragement and keep writing.
Unfortunately there are no magic pills.
You just have to push through it and keep going – otherwise you won’t finish your book.
One year from now, you’ll regret giving up only to return to writing, get discouraged again, and give up again.
Avoid entering this cycle by vowing that no matter what happens, you’ll stick to your daily writing routine and see your project through.

When Michelangelo was painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling, he wrote a poem about how much he hated it.
He complained about his aching body, about the paint dripping on his face.
He complained about the nagging thoughts he had while he was up there all alone for four years.
He even complained that he was in the wrong place, because he didn’t think he was a painter.
He was actually a sculptor, and when the pope asked him, he only agreed to paint the ceiling when the pope agreed that he could “do as he liked.

How many of us does this story describe?
I can tell you from personal experience that I have felt many times just as Michelangelo did.
I’ve complained sometimes that nothing is working out.
I’ve cried sometimes when everything went wrong, when it seemed like nothing I did was working.
I’ve become discouraged when I fell into the trap of looking at what others were doing and comparing my work to theirs, and wondering why I wasn’t seeing the same success.
How many of us listen to that nagging voice in our heads that reminds us of our aching body, the long hours, and tells us we’re in the wrong place because, “you’re not a writer.

It’s at those times that I need to remind myself: “Great! I don’t want to be a writer.
I want to do what I like and get paid for it!”
And while I don’t think I could paint anything quite as noteworthy as the Sistine Chapel, I feel like I can relate to Michelangelo when he finally stepped down from that scaffolding for the final time and admired his work.
After a particularly stressful year, or a grueling writing project of my own, I always look back with an overwhelming sense of pride and think to myself, “I really did that?”
But what’s the key to getting to that point?
Doing what we like!
So, what do we like? We’ve all decided to break into writing in some way because we all have something in common.
We believe in creating worlds.
Telling stories.
Exploring new ideas.
Isn’t that what we like?
Then who cares how you do it?
Here’s the trick to making money while doing what you like: write with purpose and passion.

Writing with purpose and passion is what will carry you through the hard times, and motivate you to try and improve on what you’ve already done.
Let’s tackle this in two parts: the purpose part first, and the passion part second.
We all need a purpose to do what we do.
It’s what gets us out of bed in the morning.
Some people call it your “why.

It’s a bit of a cliché, but there is another layer much deeper, a purpose that only you know is there.
It has to be something deep within you.
Because the world is going to test your purpose, it’s going to tempt you and test you until you prove you’re not going to waver from your purpose one way or another.
Even your wife or husband is going to test you, they’re going to ask you “are you really going to start writing again? You haven’t made money in six months and you’re going to spend the whole weekend writing again?”
That isn’t them being negative, they’re testing you to see “are you truly fixated on becoming successful?”
And if you hold the course long enough, ten or even fifteen times, they will learn to sit back with patience and trust.
They will trust you that you’re not going to deviate when other problems and storms happen.
When hard times come that force you to look at yourself and say, “Wow, this isn’t working.

Do you quit?
And your purpose is going to be different for everybody.
The reason why this is important is because:
A purpose will remind you of why you work so hard, why you sacrifice.
If you’re writing toward something greater, something important, the sacrifices you make will be made easier.
This helps you understand the impact that each action you take has on your goal.
If you’ve ever sat at your desk, or lay awake in bed at night wondering why you’re doing what you’re doing, it’s because you’ve lost focus on your purpose.
For example: Why am I spending so much time creating this fictional world? Why am I staying up so late to finish these chapters?
So, I can create a world someone would want to explore? So I’m just as satisfied with my own work as if someone else had written it? To share with the world what’s inside my head effectively? Maybe it’s just to make money?
Sometimes, we do fail, though.
The temptation is to always have a “plan B” or a fallback plan.
Here’s my advice: your “plan B” should always be “make plan A work” Otherwise when times get hard, you’re going to fall back onto plan B, and plan A will be left behind and forgotten.
The road to mediocrity is paved with “plan B’s”
It’s going to be hard, we’re going to fall short, but as long as we keep striving, we cannot fail.
Trust me, I can relate.
I’ve lost a lot of it on this journey, but at the same time I found myself.
I found my purpose.
And that’s what carries me every single day moving forward.
And if you ask me “was it worth it?” I can tell you right now, I can look myself in the mirror and say “yes, it’s been worth it.

Whatever your purpose is, it’s for you to figure out.
Once you have your purpose, though, the next thing you need is passion.
If we think of your purpose as the “why” then your passion is the “how.

To be very cliché, the dictionary describes passion as: “a strong and barely controllable emotion.

That needs to be us, when working on our writing, no matter what we’re doing.
We need to be strong and barely controllable.
We should jump out of bed excited for what the day may bring.
What new ideas may pop into our heads.
Others should be impressed with our drive and excitement surrounding this opportunity.
They should feel it in our writing.
People love passion.
We love watching passionate things and other passionate people.
It is an undeniable truth that someone will not leave what they have for something worse.
If they’re passionate about their lifestyle, their own book, or whatever it is, your passion must beat theirs!
Every conversation, every meeting and phone call can be seen as a battlefield of passions.
An infectious passion will persuade people to think, “You know, maybe there is something to this writer after all, how else could someone be so passionate about their writing?”
Now, I know what you’re thinking, “How can I possibly be passionate about everything I do, especially during the bad times? I don’t normally jump out of bed, why would I start jumping out of bed to slog through footnotes and research?”
Now that’s it, ladies and gentlemen, that’s the question that separates those who are successful, from those who are not.
It’s the difference between those who read books like How to win friends and influence people and think “Oh, that was a good book.
” And those who stop reading halfway through because they’re excited to actually test out what is says.
It’s why most books die in the author’s head.
It’s why the number of people who show up to football tryouts is significantly more than those at the end of two-a-day season.
They simply are not passionate about it.
Do some people enjoy two-a-days? Probably some crazy ones do, but I would say most do not, but that doesn’t mean they don’t pour their passion into it.
They’re uncontrollable.
Nothing will persuade them to skip their daily torture.
Even though Michelangelo hated painting the ceiling, there is no denying that he was passionate about it.
He was there every day for four years, making sure every brush stroke was perfect, every color vibrant.
Nobody can argue that he was not passionate.
You’d be surprised that some of us hate the actual process of writing.
Many of us are very bad at writing dialogue.
A lot of us don’t like editing our own work for whatever reason! But we do it, and you can tell when people do it passionately.

Seeing your work finally published, being sent out into the public, that’s when I feel passion.
An uncontrollable emotion.
It boils up inside you and almost forces you to smile, to dream big, to make lofty goals.
You can’t contain it.
Now, that’s all easy to say while we’re here, singing koombaya, and chanting together in inspirational Quora posts.
But what happens when you wake up next week all by yourself, and you make that phone-call to your friend because of your excitement and they say, “Are you kidding me? Are you one of those people?”
How will you react? What do you do? Are you still passionate?
Just writing doesn’t make you passionate, you must make it passionate.
(in other words, don’t phone-in your writing.
Don’t just try to go from plot point A to plot point B!) If you wait around for a love of writing to appear suddenly in your life, you will be left waiting forever.
That’s not how it works!
There comes a point where we must pick up our brush and paint, instead of waiting for the desire to paint.
It’s easy to look at so-and-so and say “I want that.
” But they picked up the brush, they did the meetings, they did the webinars, they did the long nights and seminars, they did the self-development, they did everything they had to do until the world trusted them and their passion
There must have been a dozen reasons for every single one of us not to write, but our passion makes us do it.
We are uncontrollable.
If you write with purpose and passion, you will be successful.
I guarantee it.
It won’t be tomorrow, it won’t be next week, but it will happen.
There is nothing anybody else can do that would be able to stop you.
It may sound hard, and the hard times definitely come.
But if you’re focused on your purpose, and you pour your passion into it at every step.
You will be surprised at how much you can accomplish.
When you go home after a long day, when the hype fades from an inspirational post, or a good day of writing, or a good message from a publisher, are you going to sit around and talk about it, or actually go out and do it again?
What are you going to do to pick your paintbrush up?

Everyone knows that inspiration leads to motivation which leads to action; but unfortunately we're not always motivated and inspired—and shouldn’t depend on motivation and inspiration in order to act.
Mark Manson explains in his book The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, that people don't realize that action leads to inspiration which leads to motivation—which then leads to more action.
Mark Manson then tells this story:
“I recently heard a story about a novelist who had written over 70 novels.
Someone asked him how he was able to write so consistently and remain inspired and motivated every day, as writers are notorious for procrastination and for fighting through bouts of “writer’s block”.
The novelist said, “200 crappy words per day, that’s it.
” The idea is that if he forced himself to write 200 crappy words, more often than not, the act of writing would inspire him and before he knew it he’d have thousands down on the page.

Commit to writing every day! This is the one thing that you have control over.
You can't guarantee that you'll feel inspiration or motivation to write, but you can just sit down and write.
The inspiration and motivation will follow.

Every year I started a blog, only to delete it a month later because I wasn’t getting enough of anything.
I always compared the number of likes I got for a post with other popular writers and set myself a standard where I felt my content was good only if I reached a certain number.
I was trapped in a vicious cycle and surrendered myself to the external environment to influence my emotions and words.

I became vividly aware of this cycle when I posted a poem and waited for the likes to barge in.
Two days later when I read the poem, I was shocked.
As much as I’d felt the poem, I had written it in the intention of getting more likes and views rather than enjoying it.
That’s when I took a break.
It’s been a month and I haven’t been able to write.
The infamous writer’s block.
After a month of lazy complaints and unmotivated attitude, I realized I’ll never be motivated enough to write.

I will have moments where I get sudden inspiration and write an amazing piece with intense motivation, but I also know it’s going to be rare.
Motivation is dangerous to rely on when it comes to writing.
As weird as this sounds, your want to write must solely rely on your want to write.
Motivation comes and goes, what should always remain are the words.
I recently came across a Prathyusha

Step 1: Remember this quote now and forever, “Inspiration is for amateurs.
The rest of us just show up and do the work.
” – Chuck Close.
Who do you want to be? A weak ass amateur or somebody who actually gets shit done?
Step 2: That said, get off your ass.
Get in front of the computer, notebook or typewriter.
You MUST fight the feelings that are going against you.
You must find the strength to power through the laziness, demotivation or fear.
This is something only you can do.
No one else can.
Step 3: Write until you get in the zone.
You’ll know when you’re in the zone.
It’s pure flow.
It gets easier now.
That’s all.
You’d have written something by now.
Hidden secret step: Don’t worry about hitting publish or if it is good enough.
Polishing up your piece can be done anytime later with a refreshed mind.
Edit only after you take a break.
This step is to also ensure you stop thinking ahead of yourself, for your only job is to write, not worry about the result in terms of going viral, making money or whatever.
Then publish when you want.
It’s up to you.
At least by then, you’d have written something.
Take pride in that.
If you want more details on how to write blog articles, check out this over
regards,
Sibi S

You have to decide how important writing is to you.
There are many ways to do this but I’ve found that Benjamin P Hardy, a writer on Medium has an effective exercise.
I used his exercise to decide what I wanted to do with my writing, so hopefully it will help you too.
You need clarity as to why you even want to write to motivate yourself to write.
Exercise: Answer this question
What about writing is important to me? Answer the question with the first thing that comes to your mind.
Then ask what about [the answer to the first question] is important to me?
Then ask yourself what about [the answer to the question above] is important to me?
Mr.
Hardy suggests doing this seven times.
After you complete this step, why you want to write will become clear, or you’ll find out that it’s something else you actually want to do – not writing.
Remind yourself daily why writing is important to you (this will keep you motivated).
More than likely you’ll find that you want to write for a bigger purpose than just writing a book or an article.
There’s why to what you want to do.
For example, let’s say you find out that you want to write to teach bullies how to curb their anger because you know someone who killed themselves because of bullying.
The why is stopping the effects of bullying by going to the source – the bully.
That’s what you’d really want to do and writing is the way for you to do it.
Next you could write out a plan for your writing to reach your goals – start a blog, write a book, create a social media campaign, etc.
Schedule writing into your day.
Block off a specific time slot and dedicate it to writing.
Join writing groups on Facebook or LinkedIn, join writing challenges, seek out writers on Twitter.
Watch motivational videos, and/or authortube videos (writers who give writing advice and talk about their writing journey).
I hope this helps.

Start a Blog.
This is what I did and it is by far the best thing ever, even though it was a bumpy road, and I did not produce a post a day like I planned to, right now I am and even more so I am writing a book and answering questions on Quora daily.
The best way is to write every single day and to get it out into the world!
You will never improve by writing for yourself, and you will never be motivated if you do not get some kind of feedback.
The motivation will come in time as you write more, at the beginning there will not be a lot.
That is okay.
That is why you should start a blog and hold yourself to producing something every day.
Sooner or later, the passion and motivation will find you!
It all starts with one blog post a day, and from there amazing things will happen.

If you cannot honestly answer these 5 questions on writing, chances are you will never find the motivation to write everyday.

Why do you want to write?
What is your dream?
How do you think you're going to achieve this dream?
How much time and work are you willing to put in on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis?
What are you willing to sacrifice in order to achieve this dream?
All of these questions need to be considered when looking to write.
Writers are a unique breed.
We write because we have a voice, deep down in our soul telling us that there are a plethora of words that need to be shared with the world.
We understand that language- more specifically written language- is the optimal tool in understanding the world around you and sharing that understanding.
We see written language as a means for sharing ideas.
We see written language as a means to inspire.
We see written language as a sacred craft.
I consider myself a writer.
Furthermore, I consider myself a good writer.

I have a calling every morning when I get up that screams, WRITE! It's like a Banshee in the back of my head that careens her way through to my fingertips.
I get anxiety when I don't write.
I think about reworking articles when I should be focused on the conversation I'm having.
When I ask myself the above questions- I can clearly see how to motivate myself to write.
All the answers lead to one simple answer:
I'm going to die, this is something that I'm good at, and I must do it.

Plain and simple.
Let's unpack the questions:
Why do I want to write?
“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.
” -Maya Angelou

It feels good.
I lose myself when I'm deep in writing.
I believe I'm good at it.
It helps me understand myself.
It helps me understand the world around me.
What is your dream?
“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.
” -Winston Churchill

My dream is to expand human consciousness through writing.
It is to write multiple pieces of work and have that work published.
Further, it is to have that published work flourish in sales and help me sustain a health income with it.
I dream to inspire people- like many other individuals.
I believe there is an energy that I gravitate towards in the writing community.
I have learned so much from the writings of others.
I have learned from Ancient Emperors.
I have learned from once homeless drugs addicts who all have chosen to share their stories.
How do you think you're going to achieve this dream?
“There is nothing to writing.
All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.
-Ernest Hemingway
Plain and simple- by writing.
I know that in order to get better at math- you practice math.
I know that in order to be a professional basketball player- you practice basketball.
In order for the words that are always flying around in my brain to become real and alive on the page- I must write.
I have also networked with countless people in the publishing industry and I have mentors that help me progress through my work.
At the barebones level, however, one needs to write in order to become a writer.

How much time and work are you willing to put in on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis?
“Tomorrow may be hell, but today was a good writing day, and on the good writing days nothing else matters.
” -Neil Gaiman

After reading many books on following a creative pursuit- most specifically writing.
I have come to terms with treating the craft as an everyday pursuit.
There is basic arithmetic that will help us understand what it will take to write 1 book for instance.
There are 365 days in a year.
With that, there are 52 weeks that can segment out those 365 days at 7 days a week.
Let's start a tad smaller than writing “every single day” and let's just write 5 days a week- similar to any normal working schedule.
That give us 5 days/week X 52 weeks = 260 working, writing days.
So, if we were to write just 1 page per working day, we would have 260 pages.
That in itself is a full book's worth of pages.
Now, one could shorten their week in half and write double the amount of pages per working day and still come up with 260.
You can work the math over and over and come up with a fully written book in a given amount of time.
All it requires is a bit of structure and perseverance to write.
What are you willing to sacrifice in order to achieve this dream?
“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.
No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.
” -Robert Frost

Writing is lonely- plain and simple.
I have sacrificed a lot of human contact and immediate joy and exciting stimuli in the pursuit of writing.
At first it was hard.
There are times in social situations I feel I have become cold and irritable.
I am not as bubbly as perhaps I used to be.
I am listening to the call of something greater than immediate pleasure, however.
Like I said in a previous question, I am looking to expand the consciousness of humanity and I am looking to do that through writing.
That means:
No more empty nights at the bar with friends.
No more mindless two-hour long phone calls to complain about so-and-so.
No more impromptu lunch dates.
No more wasteful yet pleasure filled multimedia bingeing.
And you know what?
Once you cut all that auxiliary static from you life- your writing and life become more focused and clear.
You begin to uncover your mission.

To Conclude:
I don't believe there is a magic trick that will help you tap into some Godly stream of motivation.
The motivation needed to write comes from uncovering the deeply rooted reasons why you think you should write in the first place.
One needs to identify why they have chosen this pursuit.
One needs to uncover how they are going to navigate these dreams.
What steps are they going to take to get to the promised land?
One needs to recognize how it can be isolating at times and how they can overcome such isolation.
One needs to develop their long term ideal goals.
There is no magic trick in finding the motivation to write.
Writers write, plain and simple.
You need to discover if you truly are a writer.
If you were put on this planet to share your gift of using the tool of written language to help inspire, motivate, encourage, define, share, develop, create and produce work that will help humanity as a whole- you'll have no trouble in finding the motivation to write.

(Photo Credit:
It works
My friends say with admiration that I am able to do a lot, so I guess these methods stack up.
To renew your motivation every day you need something more than emotions, you need a reason.
My reason for writing is my identity.
I consider myself a writer and writers write.
Thus I feel compelled to write every single day.
I also love helping people and teaching and I perceive my writing as a way to help others to overcome their obstacles and fight their battles.
You need to examine yourself, what motivates you to write and, according to Zig's advice, renew this motive every day.
Writing is a numbers game
Shelby mentioned he cannot force himself to write something worth reading.
But in my experience, and that of great bloggers who post regularly, this is not the best approach.
If you wait for inspiration to write something good, you may wait for a loooooong time.
If you constantly produce content every day, paying no attention to your moods, most of your output will probably be below your potential, but unavoidably you will also produce some quality material.
If your inspiration strikes once a week, you have one text a week.
If you write every day, you have 7 texts and 2-3 of them will be good enough.
“Motivation is what gets you started.
Habit is what keeps you going.
” – Jim Rohn
That's why you need a writing habit more than you need motivation.
Habit building tips
Approach it like developing any other habit – design it.
Pick one time of the day, I recommend mornings.
You have most energy and willpower in the morning, thus you have more creativity too.
Block your time, set aside an hour or even 10 minutes in your calendar.
Set reminders or alarms.
Have a topic for your writing session prepared in advance.
If you have an outline of what you want to write it's even better.
You won't stare at the blank page figuring out what to write about, you will start immediately.
Use all methods that help to establish a habit: write at the same time of day, write at the same place, create an initial ritual (I know more than a few writers who say a prayer or invocation before writing), have a clear ending point – finishing a chapter, a paragraph, writing for 15 minutes or 700 words – whatever suits you best.
Build a writing streak
Write every day, track your writing activity and build a consecutive chain of days on which you wrote.
Create a visual reminder of your progress: mark them on your wall calendar or in an application or on a piece of paper.
Building such a chain enhances your motivation.
The longer you build it the less likely you will be to abandon your writing habit.
Trust me, my chain is over 970 days long.
That's all.
Don't depend on motivation.
When it arrives, use it, and when it doesn't your habit will carry you on.

I think one of the biggest things that separates published authors from non-published authors is self-discipline.
Look, there’s no getting around the fact that if you don’t write the book…the book doesn’t get written.
It’s as simple as that.
Even veteran writers struggle with their motivation.
That’s the truth.
My least favorite part of this job is sitting down every day to write! But I do.
The best thing that I have found for myself is to write, per my last sentence, every single day.
No exceptions when I’m working on a manuscript.
In fact, because I come up with so many excuses and other things I’d rather be doing, I try to sit down and write over my morning coffee, that time when I’d probably otherwise be wasting an hour just screwing around online.
I get my kids out the door, sit down and bam.
Honestly, if I wait any longer, I dawdle throughout the day and then the idea of writing builds up to the point where it can feel excruciating.
I realize that not everyone has the schedule to do this, but the point is that you have to build it into your routine, just like you would exercise, until it simply becomes part of what you expect out of your day and yourself.
Also, give yourself a word count to hit each day and then once you do, give yourself permission to quit.
Depending on where I am in a manuscript, my goal is 1k-2k.
If I hit, say, 1001 words, I can literally get up from my chair and not return to the document until the following morning.
It’s all about knowing that there is a finish line.

The problem lies within your question: Motivation.
There’s no magic trick or secret sauce when it comes to sustained motivation.
Why? Because motivation waxes and wanes for everyone – even for superstars like Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Ray Dalio.
It’s not about motivation.
It’s about implementing daily habits that allow you to do whatever it is you want to do – in your case that’s writing – each day.
Set Aside a Defined Time
Like you, I strive to write every single day.
For me, I try to write in the morning, during my “golden hours” (the time that I am most productive).
I wake up at 5:00 a.
m.
– 5:30 a.
m.
every single weekday and write for about 60 – 90 minutes prior to making breakfast and getting ready for work.
Regardless of how the rest of my day goes, it’s one ‘win’ that I get out of the way.
It also frees me from thinking up excuses when I return home from work about how I am too tired or lazy to write in the evening.
Write Down 5 New Ideas
I stole this from James Altucher.
Altucher suggests that you jot down 10 new ideas every single day.
This will get your creative juices flowing and helps with writer’s block.
I love this idea because it excites me to start writing, which consequently lowers the chance of me pushing my daily habit of writing to the wayside.
Read a Variety of Subjects
Whether it’s on the subway, during lunch or before you fall asleep, you must incorporate reading into your daily routine.
You will not only become a better writer but also gather inspiration from unlikely places and draw innovative connections between various subjects.
This will, also, encourage you to write more.
Organize Your Day
Time blocking is a highly effective method to organize your day.
It allows you to concentrate on doing a single task within a specified time-frame.
I tend to do this during the weekday, and loosen things up on the weekend.
Here’s an example:
5:00 a.
m.
– 6:30 a.
m.
: write
6:30 a.
m.
– 6:45 a.
m.
: take out the dog
6:45 a.
m.
– 7:15 a.
m.
: make and eat breakfast
7:15 a.
m.
– 8:00 a.
m.
: shower/wash-up/get ready for work
8:00 am.
– 8:30 a.
m.
: commute to work
8:30 a.
m.
– 9:30 a.
m.
: respond to urgent work e-mails.

9:30 a.
m.
– 11:00 a.
m.
: schedule all meetings
11:00 a.
m.
– 1:00 p.
m.
: file work
1:00 p.
m.
– 2:00 p.
m.
: lunch
2:00 p.
m.
– 5:00 p.
m.
: return phone calls, administrative tasks, routine correspondence, other tasks that require low analytical skills
5:00 p.
m.
– 5:30 p.
m.
: commute home
5:30 p.
m.
– 6:30 p.
m.
: dinner
6:30 p.
m.
– 9:00 p.
m.
: unwind
9:00 p.
m.
– 10:00 p.
m.
: read

I’ve basically just shown you what an average day in the life of a lawyer (and aspiring writer) looks like.
Of course it varies from time to time, but you can see I’ve planned out almost everything.
So, even if I don’t feel like answering e-mails or interviewing a witness or writing at the crack of the dawn, it doesn’t matter – this is my schedule.
I’m not subject to the whims of my emotions.
These things have to be done within these times because I designed it that way.
If, over time, I find that this no longer suits me, I don’t hesitate to switch things up.
The point is not cramming as much things as possible within your day, but the opposite.
It’s to remove the variables that causes inconsistent results.
It’s to simplify the process and declutter your brain.
In summary, if you want to write every single day, you need to create small, but actionable, daily habits, as well as be disciplined enough to practice them.
This may mean declining social invitations.
Or watching that latest episode of your favourite show.
Or cutting the amount of time you’re aimlessly scrolling through social media.
But, I promise you, if you’re serious about writing, these actions and systems will keep you calm, focused and productive, regardless of how you’re feeling that day.

Words create sentences; sentences create paragraphs; sometimes paragraphs quicken and begin to breathe.

– Stephen King
If you’re climbing a mountain, you don’t stop after taking several steps upon realizing that there are still thousands of steps to the top.
You take it step by step, slowly gaining elevation and getting closer to your destination.

Writing books works the same way.
You focus on each word, each paragraph, each page, and each finished chapter.
One by one, you’re getting closer to finishing your first draft.
The most important strategy that has helped me become a bestselling self-help author is following a routine of writing a specific number of words a day.

In the past, I used to write 3,000 words a day and today, to make the process more sustainable, I write 1,000 words a day.
This way, if you know the approximate final length of your first draft (and you should know – it’s easier to write if you know your target total word count), you can easily calculate how many days of writing you have left.
Then it’s not a matter of motivation – it’s just a matter of consistency.
Do I always feel like writing? Not really.
However, since I have a routine in place, it keeps me going even when I find it hard to write.
Also, please remember that every writer goes through what you’re going through now.
Every single time I’m writing a new book, I go through the exact same thing when I’m approximately halfway done.
Reminding myself that within an x number of days I’ll be done helps me overcome the discouragement and keep writing.
Unfortunately there are no magic pills.
You just have to push through it and keep going – otherwise you won’t finish your book.
One year from now, you’ll regret giving up only to return to writing, get discouraged again, and give up again.
Avoid entering this cycle by vowing that no matter what happens, you’ll stick to your daily writing routine and see your project through.

When Michelangelo was painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling, he wrote a poem about how much he hated it.
He complained about his aching body, about the paint dripping on his face.
He complained about the nagging thoughts he had while he was up there all alone for four years.
He even complained that he was in the wrong place, because he didn’t think he was a painter.
He was actually a sculptor, and when the pope asked him, he only agreed to paint the ceiling when the pope agreed that he could “do as he liked.

How many of us does this story describe?
I can tell you from personal experience that I have felt many times just as Michelangelo did.
I’ve complained sometimes that nothing is working out.
I’ve cried sometimes when everything went wrong, when it seemed like nothing I did was working.
I’ve become discouraged when I fell into the trap of looking at what others were doing and comparing my work to theirs, and wondering why I wasn’t seeing the same success.
How many of us listen to that nagging voice in our heads that reminds us of our aching body, the long hours, and tells us we’re in the wrong place because, “you’re not a writer.

It’s at those times that I need to remind myself: “Great! I don’t want to be a writer.
I want to do what I like and get paid for it!”
And while I don’t think I could paint anything quite as noteworthy as the Sistine Chapel, I feel like I can relate to Michelangelo when he finally stepped down from that scaffolding for the final time and admired his work.
After a particularly stressful year, or a grueling writing project of my own, I always look back with an overwhelming sense of pride and think to myself, “I really did that?”
But what’s the key to getting to that point?
Doing what we like!
So, what do we like? We’ve all decided to break into writing in some way because we all have something in common.
We believe in creating worlds.
Telling stories.
Exploring new ideas.
Isn’t that what we like?
Then who cares how you do it?
Here’s the trick to making money while doing what you like: write with purpose and passion.

Writing with purpose and passion is what will carry you through the hard times, and motivate you to try and improve on what you’ve already done.
Let’s tackle this in two parts: the purpose part first, and the passion part second.
We all need a purpose to do what we do.
It’s what gets us out of bed in the morning.
Some people call it your “why.

It’s a bit of a cliché, but there is another layer much deeper, a purpose that only you know is there.
It has to be something deep within you.
Because the world is going to test your purpose, it’s going to tempt you and test you until you prove you’re not going to waver from your purpose one way or another.
Even your wife or husband is going to test you, they’re going to ask you “are you really going to start writing again? You haven’t made money in six months and you’re going to spend the whole weekend writing again?”
That isn’t them being negative, they’re testing you to see “are you truly fixated on becoming successful?”
And if you hold the course long enough, ten or even fifteen times, they will learn to sit back with patience and trust.
They will trust you that you’re not going to deviate when other problems and storms happen.
When hard times come that force you to look at yourself and say, “Wow, this isn’t working.

Do you quit?
And your purpose is going to be different for everybody.
The reason why this is important is because:
A purpose will remind you of why you work so hard, why you sacrifice.
If you’re writing toward something greater, something important, the sacrifices you make will be made easier.
This helps you understand the impact that each action you take has on your goal.
If you’ve ever sat at your desk, or lay awake in bed at night wondering why you’re doing what you’re doing, it’s because you’ve lost focus on your purpose.
For example: Why am I spending so much time creating this fictional world? Why am I staying up so late to finish these chapters?
So, I can create a world someone would want to explore? So I’m just as satisfied with my own work as if someone else had written it? To share with the world what’s inside my head effectively? Maybe it’s just to make money?
Sometimes, we do fail, though.
The temptation is to always have a “plan B” or a fallback plan.
Here’s my advice: your “plan B” should always be “make plan A work” Otherwise when times get hard, you’re going to fall back onto plan B, and plan A will be left behind and forgotten.
The road to mediocrity is paved with “plan B’s”
It’s going to be hard, we’re going to fall short, but as long as we keep striving, we cannot fail.
Trust me, I can relate.
I’ve lost a lot of it on this journey, but at the same time I found myself.
I found my purpose.
And that’s what carries me every single day moving forward.
And if you ask me “was it worth it?” I can tell you right now, I can look myself in the mirror and say “yes, it’s been worth it.

Whatever your purpose is, it’s for you to figure out.
Once you have your purpose, though, the next thing you need is passion.
If we think of your purpose as the “why” then your passion is the “how.

To be very cliché, the dictionary describes passion as: “a strong and barely controllable emotion.

That needs to be us, when working on our writing, no matter what we’re doing.
We need to be strong and barely controllable.
We should jump out of bed excited for what the day may bring.
What new ideas may pop into our heads.
Others should be impressed with our drive and excitement surrounding this opportunity.
They should feel it in our writing.
People love passion.
We love watching passionate things and other passionate people.
It is an undeniable truth that someone will not leave what they have for something worse.
If they’re passionate about their lifestyle, their own book, or whatever it is, your passion must beat theirs!
Every conversation, every meeting and phone call can be seen as a battlefield of passions.
An infectious passion will persuade people to think, “You know, maybe there is something to this writer after all, how else could someone be so passionate about their writing?”
Now, I know what you’re thinking, “How can I possibly be passionate about everything I do, especially during the bad times? I don’t normally jump out of bed, why would I start jumping out of bed to slog through footnotes and research?”
Now that’s it, ladies and gentlemen, that’s the question that separates those who are successful, from those who are not.
It’s the difference between those who read books like How to win friends and influence people and think “Oh, that was a good book.
” And those who stop reading halfway through because they’re excited to actually test out what is says.
It’s why most books die in the author’s head.
It’s why the number of people who show up to football tryouts is significantly more than those at the end of two-a-day season.
They simply are not passionate about it.
Do some people enjoy two-a-days? Probably some crazy ones do, but I would say most do not, but that doesn’t mean they don’t pour their passion into it.
They’re uncontrollable.
Nothing will persuade them to skip their daily torture.
Even though Michelangelo hated painting the ceiling, there is no denying that he was passionate about it.
He was there every day for four years, making sure every brush stroke was perfect, every color vibrant.
Nobody can argue that he was not passionate.
You’d be surprised that some of us hate the actual process of writing.
Many of us are very bad at writing dialogue.
A lot of us don’t like editing our own work for whatever reason! But we do it, and you can tell when people do it passionately.

Seeing your work finally published, being sent out into the public, that’s when I feel passion.
An uncontrollable emotion.
It boils up inside you and almost forces you to smile, to dream big, to make lofty goals.
You can’t contain it.
Now, that’s all easy to say while we’re here, singing koombaya, and chanting together in inspirational Quora posts.
But what happens when you wake up next week all by yourself, and you make that phone-call to your friend because of your excitement and they say, “Are you kidding me? Are you one of those people?”
How will you react? What do you do? Are you still passionate?
Just writing doesn’t make you passionate, you must make it passionate.
(in other words, don’t phone-in your writing.
Don’t just try to go from plot point A to plot point B!) If you wait around for a love of writing to appear suddenly in your life, you will be left waiting forever.
That’s not how it works!
There comes a point where we must pick up our brush and paint, instead of waiting for the desire to paint.
It’s easy to look at so-and-so and say “I want that.
” But they picked up the brush, they did the meetings, they did the webinars, they did the long nights and seminars, they did the self-development, they did everything they had to do until the world trusted them and their passion
There must have been a dozen reasons for every single one of us not to write, but our passion makes us do it.
We are uncontrollable.
If you write with purpose and passion, you will be successful.
I guarantee it.
It won’t be tomorrow, it won’t be next week, but it will happen.
There is nothing anybody else can do that would be able to stop you.
It may sound hard, and the hard times definitely come.
But if you’re focused on your purpose, and you pour your passion into it at every step.
You will be surprised at how much you can accomplish.
When you go home after a long day, when the hype fades from an inspirational post, or a good day of writing, or a good message from a publisher, are you going to sit around and talk about it, or actually go out and do it again?
What are you going to do to pick your paintbrush up?

Everyone knows that inspiration leads to motivation which leads to action; but unfortunately we're not always motivated and inspired—and shouldn’t depend on motivation and inspiration in order to act.
Mark Manson explains in his book The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, that people don't realize that action leads to inspiration which leads to motivation—which then leads to more action.
Mark Manson then tells this story:
“I recently heard a story about a novelist who had written over 70 novels.
Someone asked him how he was able to write so consistently and remain inspired and motivated every day, as writers are notorious for procrastination and for fighting through bouts of “writer’s block”.
The novelist said, “200 crappy words per day, that’s it.
” The idea is that if he forced himself to write 200 crappy words, more often than not, the act of writing would inspire him and before he knew it he’d have thousands down on the page.

Commit to writing every day! This is the one thing that you have control over.
You can't guarantee that you'll feel inspiration or motivation to write, but you can just sit down and write.
The inspiration and motivation will follow.

Every year I started a blog, only to delete it a month later because I wasn’t getting enough of anything.
I always compared the number of likes I got for a post with other popular writers and set myself a standard where I felt my content was good only if I reached a certain number.
I was trapped in a vicious cycle and surrendered myself to the external environment to influence my emotions and words.

I became vividly aware of this cycle when I posted a poem and waited for the likes to barge in.
Two days later when I read the poem, I was shocked.
As much as I’d felt the poem, I had written it in the intention of getting more likes and views rather than enjoying it.
That’s when I took a break.
It’s been a month and I haven’t been able to write.
The infamous writer’s block.
After a month of lazy complaints and unmotivated attitude, I realized I’ll never be motivated enough to write.

I will have moments where I get sudden inspiration and write an amazing piece with intense motivation, but I also know it’s going to be rare.
Motivation is dangerous to rely on when it comes to writing.
As weird as this sounds, your want to write must solely rely on your want to write.
Motivation comes and goes, what should always remain are the words.
I recently came across a Prathyusha

Step 1: Remember this quote now and forever, “Inspiration is for amateurs.
The rest of us just show up and do the work.
” – Chuck Close.
Who do you want to be? A weak ass amateur or somebody who actually gets shit done?
Step 2: That said, get off your ass.
Get in front of the computer, notebook or typewriter.
You MUST fight the feelings that are going against you.
You must find the strength to power through the laziness, demotivation or fear.
This is something only you can do.
No one else can.
Step 3: Write until you get in the zone.
You’ll know when you’re in the zone.
It’s pure flow.
It gets easier now.
That’s all.
You’d have written something by now.
Hidden secret step: Don’t worry about hitting publish or if it is good enough.
Polishing up your piece can be done anytime later with a refreshed mind.
Edit only after you take a break.
This step is to also ensure you stop thinking ahead of yourself, for your only job is to write, not worry about the result in terms of going viral, making money or whatever.
Then publish when you want.
It’s up to you.
At least by then, you’d have written something.
Take pride in that.
If you want more details on how to write blog articles, check out this over
regards,
Sibi S

You have to decide how important writing is to you.
There are many ways to do this but I’ve found that Benjamin P Hardy, a writer on Medium has an effective exercise.
I used his exercise to decide what I wanted to do with my writing, so hopefully it will help you too.
You need clarity as to why you even want to write to motivate yourself to write.
Exercise: Answer this question
What about writing is important to me? Answer the question with the first thing that comes to your mind.
Then ask what about [the answer to the first question] is important to me?
Then ask yourself what about [the answer to the question above] is important to me?
Mr.
Hardy suggests doing this seven times.
After you complete this step, why you want to write will become clear, or you’ll find out that it’s something else you actually want to do – not writing.
Remind yourself daily why writing is important to you (this will keep you motivated).
More than likely you’ll find that you want to write for a bigger purpose than just writing a book or an article.
There’s why to what you want to do.
For example, let’s say you find out that you want to write to teach bullies how to curb their anger because you know someone who killed themselves because of bullying.
The why is stopping the effects of bullying by going to the source – the bully.
That’s what you’d really want to do and writing is the way for you to do it.
Next you could write out a plan for your writing to reach your goals – start a blog, write a book, create a social media campaign, etc.
Schedule writing into your day.
Block off a specific time slot and dedicate it to writing.
Join writing groups on Facebook or LinkedIn, join writing challenges, seek out writers on Twitter.
Watch motivational videos, and/or authortube videos (writers who give writing advice and talk about their writing journey).
I hope this helps.

Start a Blog.
This is what I did and it is by far the best thing ever, even though it was a bumpy road, and I did not produce a post a day like I planned to, right now I am and even more so I am writing a book and answering questions on Quora daily.
The best way is to write every single day and to get it out into the world!
You will never improve by writing for yourself, and you will never be motivated if you do not get some kind of feedback.
The motivation will come in time as you write more, at the beginning there will not be a lot.
That is okay.
That is why you should start a blog and hold yourself to producing something every day.
Sooner or later, the passion and motivation will find you!
It all starts with one blog post a day, and from there amazing things will happen.

If you cannot honestly answer these 5 questions on writing, chances are you will never find the motivation to write everyday.

Why do you want to write?
What is your dream?
How do you think you're going to achieve this dream?
How much time and work are you willing to put in on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis?
What are you willing to sacrifice in order to achieve this dream?
All of these questions need to be considered when looking to write.
Writers are a unique breed.
We write because we have a voice, deep down in our soul telling us that there are a plethora of words that need to be shared with the world.
We understand that language- more specifically written language- is the optimal tool in understanding the world around you and sharing that understanding.
We see written language as a means for sharing ideas.
We see written language as a means to inspire.
We see written language as a sacred craft.
I consider myself a writer.
Furthermore, I consider myself a good writer.

I have a calling every morning when I get up that screams, WRITE! It's like a Banshee in the back of my head that careens her way through to my fingertips.
I get anxiety when I don't write.
I think about reworking articles when I should be focused on the conversation I'm having.
When I ask myself the above questions- I can clearly see how to motivate myself to write.
All the answers lead to one simple answer:
I'm going to die, this is something that I'm good at, and I must do it.

Plain and simple.
Let's unpack the questions:
Why do I want to write?
“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.
” -Maya Angelou

It feels good.
I lose myself when I'm deep in writing.
I believe I'm good at it.
It helps me understand myself.
It helps me understand the world around me.
What is your dream?
“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.
” -Winston Churchill

My dream is to expand human consciousness through writing.
It is to write multiple pieces of work and have that work published.
Further, it is to have that published work flourish in sales and help me sustain a health income with it.
I dream to inspire people- like many other individuals.
I believe there is an energy that I gravitate towards in the writing community.
I have learned so much from the writings of others.
I have learned from Ancient Emperors.
I have learned from once homeless drugs addicts who all have chosen to share their stories.
How do you think you're going to achieve this dream?
“There is nothing to writing.
All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.
-Ernest Hemingway
Plain and simple- by writing.
I know that in order to get better at math- you practice math.
I know that in order to be a professional basketball player- you practice basketball.
In order for the words that are always flying around in my brain to become real and alive on the page- I must write.
I have also networked with countless people in the publishing industry and I have mentors that help me progress through my work.
At the barebones level, however, one needs to write in order to become a writer.

How much time and work are you willing to put in on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis?
“Tomorrow may be hell, but today was a good writing day, and on the good writing days nothing else matters.
” -Neil Gaiman

After reading many books on following a creative pursuit- most specifically writing.
I have come to terms with treating the craft as an everyday pursuit.
There is basic arithmetic that will help us understand what it will take to write 1 book for instance.
There are 365 days in a year.
With that, there are 52 weeks that can segment out those 365 days at 7 days a week.
Let's start a tad smaller than writing “every single day” and let's just write 5 days a week- similar to any normal working schedule.
That give us 5 days/week X 52 weeks = 260 working, writing days.
So, if we were to write just 1 page per working day, we would have 260 pages.
That in itself is a full book's worth of pages.
Now, one could shorten their week in half and write double the amount of pages per working day and still come up with 260.
You can work the math over and over and come up with a fully written book in a given amount of time.
All it requires is a bit of structure and perseverance to write.
What are you willing to sacrifice in order to achieve this dream?
“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.
No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.
” -Robert Frost

Writing is lonely- plain and simple.
I have sacrificed a lot of human contact and immediate joy and exciting stimuli in the pursuit of writing.
At first it was hard.
There are times in social situations I feel I have become cold and irritable.
I am not as bubbly as perhaps I used to be.
I am listening to the call of something greater than immediate pleasure, however.
Like I said in a previous question, I am looking to expand the consciousness of humanity and I am looking to do that through writing.
That means:
No more empty nights at the bar with friends.
No more mindless two-hour long phone calls to complain about so-and-so.
No more impromptu lunch dates.
No more wasteful yet pleasure filled multimedia bingeing.
And you know what?
Once you cut all that auxiliary static from you life- your writing and life become more focused and clear.
You begin to uncover your mission.

To Conclude:
I don't believe there is a magic trick that will help you tap into some Godly stream of motivation.
The motivation needed to write comes from uncovering the deeply rooted reasons why you think you should write in the first place.
One needs to identify why they have chosen this pursuit.
One needs to uncover how they are going to navigate these dreams.
What steps are they going to take to get to the promised land?
One needs to recognize how it can be isolating at times and how they can overcome such isolation.
One needs to develop their long term ideal goals.
There is no magic trick in finding the motivation to write.
Writers write, plain and simple.
You need to discover if you truly are a writer.
If you were put on this planet to share your gift of using the tool of written language to help inspire, motivate, encourage, define, share, develop, create and produce work that will help humanity as a whole- you'll have no trouble in finding the motivation to write.

(Photo Credit:
How can I stay motivated to write a web serial

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