How can I improve my English writing skills

How can I improve my English writing skills?

Well.
You can improve your writing skills by… Writing!
Forget everything else.
You do not need to be well learnt, informed or educated.
No matter how weak your vocabulary is, I think you can end up producing awe-inspiring pieces of content.
Do not waste one minute on some “killer tips” or “quality guidelines”.
Just write.
What do you mean by saying just write, Mr Neman?
Just vomit on the page, so to speak.
Write it down.

Please don’t tell me you can’t do it.
You can!
All you need to improve your writing skills is… writing.
Do yourself a favor and tell your story no matter how mediocre you might think it is.
Your thoughts and your writing should match.
Be honest and say whatever you simply want to say.
Be real.
Show your true imperfection.
It won’t suck.
Your readers are just ordinary people like you.
It isn’t a quantum physics exam.
Trust me, you can write mind blowing content.
Practice will help finding your voice and Voila!
Do not edit yourself to make your content amazing and interesting.
If you have to edit it, means you are not perfect.
Here’s a news flash… No one is.
Originality and simplicity are compelling virtues.
Gradually you will become better in the art of expression through words.
I am stressing this point because if you start editing to make a perfect story.
I am afraid You will get used to do that.
You will write in 10 minutes and edit in 50.
Tell me if that’s something you really want? To me that is not natural.
I would never be able to understand you if you don’t let me get a true mental image.
Say no to anyone who tells you to go get better at your dumb vocabulary or learn some killer pro tips first.
All you want to do is express yourself in words.
Do it continuously and see if writing interests you.
See if you feel comfortable doing that.
See if it’s your thing.
But first hand, make a go at it and practice.
Hopefully you will start seeing improvements in your skills.
Then sky is the limit and you can hone it to your satisfaction.
Start writing and hit publish.
Do that and I will personally guarantee while sharing your story with the world, you will learn a thing or two about yourself as well.
God bless you, God be with you, God speed and I will even throw in a bonus gesundheit.

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Write more on Quora.

Not even kidding.
One of my New Year’s resolutions is to improve the quality of my writing, a skill I've struggled with since high school.
A year back, I discovered Quora.
It was the place I discovered some of my favorite writers like James Altucher and even professors, consultants, and doctors.
The interesting part? Many of the writers weren’t experts or doctorates.
They were normal Internet users that simply had a unique opinion to share.
On a whim, I began to answer questions on Quora; it turned from spontaneous word vomit about the Patriots and Kobe Bryant to more structured shorts on entrepreneurship, education, career advice.
Many of my Quora answers led to ideas for blogs and many also helped my writing get discovered by strangers on the Internet.
I made it a New Year’s resolution to write once every other day.
Quora gave me energy and also let me into a secret: The only way to break self-doubts while writing is to create value and confidence.
How does Quora help you achieve this?
Preset Writing Prompts
With more than 1.
5 million questions available on Quora, Quora has begun to streamline questions to users based on their most popular or sought out categories.
These answers are often short – no more than two to three paragraphs, with far less pressure to create an emulation of a New York Times editorial.
The “Questions for You” tab enables you to answer questions based on your recent answers: My last four answers on Quora were about Bernie Sanders, Swarm, and the NFL – this triggered an algorithm that brought topics I was passionate about to my attention.
One of the biggest barriers I hear when it comes to writing consistently is “I have writer’s block” or ‘I have no idea what to write about”.
With preset writing prompts, all you have to do is look at a question already proposed to inspire new opinions and ideas.
Many of these short answers can be turned into riveting long-form blogs.
Opportunities For Reading and Learning
One of the biggest lessons I learned from one of my favorite authors, James Altucher: "You can’t write without first reading.
A lot.
"
Compared to every question I respond to on Quora, I read about 10-15 answers.
With more than 200 people I regularly follow, I read everything from life hacks to thoughts on the Donald Trump presidential campaign.
I read high quality answers from experts as well as short answers from Reddit addicts.
While I don’t have enough time in the day to read full-length books, my Quora app allows me to shift rather quickly through a number of questions during a commute or before bed.
Reading many different answers gives you immediate exposure to different authors, styles of writing, sentence structures and vocabularies.
The stream-of-consciousness approach I use in many of my blogs comes from the number of answers I’ve enjoyed reading on Quora.
Writing growth cannot be a selfish pursuit – it has to be cultivated through constant exposure and acknowledgement of quality when you see it.
It has to be cultivated through learning and compounding upon your preconceptions of ideas.
This is where reading becomes essential.
No Permission Needed
My biggest self-doubts as a writer first came from rejections – editors saying that the writing wasn’t good or the idea wasn’t creative enough.
While I do concede that some of the writing may have been absolute garbage, rejection is certainly a self-esteem poison.
Many times, it made me want to quit writing forever.
With Quora, all you need to do to be regarded as a writer is have a Quora account.
Nobody needs to approve your post.
Nobody needs to validate your writing before you put it out there.
The more you answer on a specific topic, the more you begin to build trust amongst a niche group of readers.
Because it removes the anonymous veil of Reddit, you can also connect your social profiles and blogs to Quora – real people will notice you in real –time.
This is a tremendous boost for confidence.
Measurable Statistics
Having measurable statistics as a first-time writer or a seasoned veteran is a blessing – it allows you to see which of your answers are attracting attention and allows you to clarify what people are enjoying.
In a way, it’s a form of multivariate analysis – whenever I find one answer that gets more views than another, I always try to investigate why.
Was it the shock value? The vocabulary? The call to action? Finding your niche as a writer is tough – it helps to see evidence of where you’re reaching your audience.
Self-Enforced Grammar Checks
You can't be a better biker with training wheels and you can't become a better writer with the proverbial shackles of automatic grammar refinement.
While writing in Microsoft Word can lend itself to efficient grammar checks, writing in Quora is almost a liberation.
Be comfortable with letting go.
You’re free of the risk that your creative sentence may be a fragment or your conversational language is breaking every violation of English grammar.
While some may frown at lack of rigid structure, I praise the freedom it gives you to be your own boss.
You will grasp grammar better when you read it for yourself and sound it out, instead of blindly lending the beauty of your writing to be eroded by Microsoft Word's grammar machines.
It will condition you to avoid mistakes instead of anticipating them.
If all else fails, there is still spell check.

Immediate Value
My very first blog post I wrote in college got exactly zero hits.
It was all about how to best learn Spanish.
I wanted to help people.
The zero hits certainly discouraged The best part about Quora's transactional nature is that every answer you write is in response to a question.
Simply by writing or sharing your thoughts, you are helping another human being in real-time as well as others following that same question.
Any advice you give, enlightening opinion you share, or story you write is immediately given back to the person who proposed the question in the first place.
If your goal with writing is to help or impact people, there is no more evident or encouraging way to know you've made an impact than Quora.
Improving your writing is a journey that, like any other form of art, takes practice, iteration, and confidence.
Don't be nervous about strangers or mistakes.
Don't be afraid to let yourself be consumed by the writing of others.
I'm still not where I'd love to be but I'm trying to inch the gap closer and plan to write on Quora once every other day.
You should set this goal for yourself as well!

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

How can I improve my English writing skills?

Well.
You can improve your writing skills by… Writing!
Forget everything else.
You do not need to be well learnt, informed or educated.
No matter how weak your vocabulary is, I think you can end up producing awe-inspiring pieces of content.
Do not waste one minute on some “killer tips” or “quality guidelines”.
Just write.
What do you mean by saying just write, Mr Neman?
Just vomit on the page, so to speak.
Write it down.

Please don’t tell me you can’t do it.
You can!
All you need to improve your writing skills is… writing.
Do yourself a favor and tell your story no matter how mediocre you might think it is.
Your thoughts and your writing should match.
Be honest and say whatever you simply want to say.
Be real.
Show your true imperfection.
It won’t suck.
Your readers are just ordinary people like you.
It isn’t a quantum physics exam.
Trust me, you can write mind blowing content.
Practice will help finding your voice and Voila!
Do not edit yourself to make your content amazing and interesting.
If you have to edit it, means you are not perfect.
Here’s a news flash… No one is.
Originality and simplicity are compelling virtues.
Gradually you will become better in the art of expression through words.
I am stressing this point because if you start editing to make a perfect story.
I am afraid You will get used to do that.
You will write in 10 minutes and edit in 50.
Tell me if that’s something you really want? To me that is not natural.
I would never be able to understand you if you don’t let me get a true mental image.
Say no to anyone who tells you to go get better at your dumb vocabulary or learn some killer pro tips first.
All you want to do is express yourself in words.
Do it continuously and see if writing interests you.
See if you feel comfortable doing that.
See if it’s your thing.
But first hand, make a go at it and practice.
Hopefully you will start seeing improvements in your skills.
Then sky is the limit and you can hone it to your satisfaction.
Start writing and hit publish.
Do that and I will personally guarantee while sharing your story with the world, you will learn a thing or two about yourself as well.
God bless you, God be with you, God speed and I will even throw in a bonus gesundheit.

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source:
[1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Write more on Quora.

Not even kidding.
One of my New Year’s resolutions is to improve the quality of my writing, a skill I've struggled with since high school.
A year back, I discovered Quora.
It was the place I discovered some of my favorite writers like James Altucher and even professors, consultants, and doctors.
The interesting part? Many of the writers weren’t experts or doctorates.
They were normal Internet users that simply had a unique opinion to share.
On a whim, I began to answer questions on Quora; it turned from spontaneous word vomit about the Patriots and Kobe Bryant to more structured shorts on entrepreneurship, education, career advice.
Many of my Quora answers led to ideas for blogs and many also helped my writing get discovered by strangers on the Internet.
I made it a New Year’s resolution to write once every other day.
Quora gave me energy and also let me into a secret: The only way to break self-doubts while writing is to create value and confidence.
How does Quora help you achieve this?
Preset Writing Prompts
With more than 1.
5 million questions available on Quora, Quora has begun to streamline questions to users based on their most popular or sought out categories.
These answers are often short – no more than two to three paragraphs, with far less pressure to create an emulation of a New York Times editorial.
The “Questions for You” tab enables you to answer questions based on your recent answers: My last four answers on Quora were about Bernie Sanders, Swarm, and the NFL – this triggered an algorithm that brought topics I was passionate about to my attention.
One of the biggest barriers I hear when it comes to writing consistently is “I have writer’s block” or ‘I have no idea what to write about”.
With preset writing prompts, all you have to do is look at a question already proposed to inspire new opinions and ideas.
Many of these short answers can be turned into riveting long-form blogs.
Opportunities For Reading and Learning
One of the biggest lessons I learned from one of my favorite authors, James Altucher: "You can’t write without first reading.
A lot.
"
Compared to every question I respond to on Quora, I read about 10-15 answers.
With more than 200 people I regularly follow, I read everything from life hacks to thoughts on the Donald Trump presidential campaign.
I read high quality answers from experts as well as short answers from Reddit addicts.
While I don’t have enough time in the day to read full-length books, my Quora app allows me to shift rather quickly through a number of questions during a commute or before bed.
Reading many different answers gives you immediate exposure to different authors, styles of writing, sentence structures and vocabularies.
The stream-of-consciousness approach I use in many of my blogs comes from the number of answers I’ve enjoyed reading on Quora.
Writing growth cannot be a selfish pursuit – it has to be cultivated through constant exposure and acknowledgement of quality when you see it.
It has to be cultivated through learning and compounding upon your preconceptions of ideas.
This is where reading becomes essential.
No Permission Needed
My biggest self-doubts as a writer first came from rejections – editors saying that the writing wasn’t good or the idea wasn’t creative enough.
While I do concede that some of the writing may have been absolute garbage, rejection is certainly a self-esteem poison.
Many times, it made me want to quit writing forever.
With Quora, all you need to do to be regarded as a writer is have a Quora account.
Nobody needs to approve your post.
Nobody needs to validate your writing before you put it out there.
The more you answer on a specific topic, the more you begin to build trust amongst a niche group of readers.
Because it removes the anonymous veil of Reddit, you can also connect your social profiles and blogs to Quora – real people will notice you in real –time.
This is a tremendous boost for confidence.
Measurable Statistics
Having measurable statistics as a first-time writer or a seasoned veteran is a blessing – it allows you to see which of your answers are attracting attention and allows you to clarify what people are enjoying.
In a way, it’s a form of multivariate analysis – whenever I find one answer that gets more views than another, I always try to investigate why.
Was it the shock value? The vocabulary? The call to action? Finding your niche as a writer is tough – it helps to see evidence of where you’re reaching your audience.
Self-Enforced Grammar Checks
You can't be a better biker with training wheels and you can't become a better writer with the proverbial shackles of automatic grammar refinement.
While writing in Microsoft Word can lend itself to efficient grammar checks, writing in Quora is almost a liberation.
Be comfortable with letting go.
You’re free of the risk that your creative sentence may be a fragment or your conversational language is breaking every violation of English grammar.
While some may frown at lack of rigid structure, I praise the freedom it gives you to be your own boss.
You will grasp grammar better when you read it for yourself and sound it out, instead of blindly lending the beauty of your writing to be eroded by Microsoft Word's grammar machines.
It will condition you to avoid mistakes instead of anticipating them.
If all else fails, there is still spell check.

Immediate Value
My very first blog post I wrote in college got exactly zero hits.
It was all about how to best learn Spanish.
I wanted to help people.
The zero hits certainly discouraged The best part about Quora's transactional nature is that every answer you write is in response to a question.
Simply by writing or sharing your thoughts, you are helping another human being in real-time as well as others following that same question.
Any advice you give, enlightening opinion you share, or story you write is immediately given back to the person who proposed the question in the first place.
If your goal with writing is to help or impact people, there is no more evident or encouraging way to know you've made an impact than Quora.
Improving your writing is a journey that, like any other form of art, takes practice, iteration, and confidence.
Don't be nervous about strangers or mistakes.
Don't be afraid to let yourself be consumed by the writing of others.
I'm still not where I'd love to be but I'm trying to inch the gap closer and plan to write on Quora once every other day.
You should set this goal for yourself as well!

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

Numerous people struggle with writing in English.
It has nothing to do with writing itself, but with the skills you need to have when it comes to writing in English.
It can really be a real challenge to improve.
However, there is no need to worry.
These are several vital tips that can help you improve your English writing skills.
It will indeed take you some time, but it will be worth it.
At least it turned out to be pretty fine for me.
I even got awarded and became a
Translating is merely taking something that you've written in a way that's clear to you, and reworking it subtly to make it clear for other people.
Sometimes you need to do it, sometimes you don't- but it's something all writers should be able to do.
You should also find (or make up) your own writing exercises that you do regularly.
They don't have to be particularly long- just long enough to prime your brain by playing with words.
Maybe write three totally alliterative sentences, or do a stream of conscious poem, or create a character using nothing but the elements on your desk, or even a brief journal entry (never underestimate the power of katharsis).
Just fun stuff to get your brain working.
Just like the body needs a good stretching and a light warm up before working out, our brains need the same thing.
It flushes us and helps to get the "bad words" out, so that when we sit down to write the real thing, we're using the "good words.
"
And last, but not least, remember that all of these are just guidelines.
Use them to structure your own, personal, methods of writing development and content proficiency.
There are several universal practices for becoming more skilled in writing content (many of which I mentioned), but the golden ticket is yours alone to discover.
Only you can find out what works for you.
.
.
but when you do, it's like striking oil and your pen will truly be your greatest ally.
But you can only find that out.
.
.
by writing.
May the words be with you!
###

I discovered a best answer for this question from Onboardly
How to Become a Better Storyteller in 30 Days
Day 1 – Find a space to write
If you are a paper-person, get a journal.
Some of my personal favorites include the ever-esteemed
Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

How can I improve my English writing skills?

Well.
You can improve your writing skills by… Writing!
Forget everything else.
You do not need to be well learnt, informed or educated.
No matter how weak your vocabulary is, I think you can end up producing awe-inspiring pieces of content.
Do not waste one minute on some “killer tips” or “quality guidelines”.
Just write.
What do you mean by saying just write, Mr Neman?
Just vomit on the page, so to speak.
Write it down.

Please don’t tell me you can’t do it.
You can!
All you need to improve your writing skills is… writing.
Do yourself a favor and tell your story no matter how mediocre you might think it is.
Your thoughts and your writing should match.
Be honest and say whatever you simply want to say.
Be real.
Show your true imperfection.
It won’t suck.
Your readers are just ordinary people like you.
It isn’t a quantum physics exam.
Trust me, you can write mind blowing content.
Practice will help finding your voice and Voila!
Do not edit yourself to make your content amazing and interesting.
If you have to edit it, means you are not perfect.
Here’s a news flash… No one is.
Originality and simplicity are compelling virtues.
Gradually you will become better in the art of expression through words.
I am stressing this point because if you start editing to make a perfect story.
I am afraid You will get used to do that.
You will write in 10 minutes and edit in 50.
Tell me if that’s something you really want? To me that is not natural.
I would never be able to understand you if you don’t let me get a true mental image.
Say no to anyone who tells you to go get better at your dumb vocabulary or learn some killer pro tips first.
All you want to do is express yourself in words.
Do it continuously and see if writing interests you.
See if you feel comfortable doing that.
See if it’s your thing.
But first hand, make a go at it and practice.
Hopefully you will start seeing improvements in your skills.
Then sky is the limit and you can hone it to your satisfaction.
Start writing and hit publish.
Do that and I will personally guarantee while sharing your story with the world, you will learn a thing or two about yourself as well.
God bless you, God be with you, God speed and I will even throw in a bonus gesundheit.

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Write more on Quora.

Not even kidding.
One of my New Year’s resolutions is to improve the quality of my writing, a skill I've struggled with since high school.
A year back, I discovered Quora.
It was the place I discovered some of my favorite writers like James Altucher and even professors, consultants, and doctors.
The interesting part? Many of the writers weren’t experts or doctorates.
They were normal Internet users that simply had a unique opinion to share.
On a whim, I began to answer questions on Quora; it turned from spontaneous word vomit about the Patriots and Kobe Bryant to more structured shorts on entrepreneurship, education, career advice.
Many of my Quora answers led to ideas for blogs and many also helped my writing get discovered by strangers on the Internet.
I made it a New Year’s resolution to write once every other day.
Quora gave me energy and also let me into a secret: The only way to break self-doubts while writing is to create value and confidence.
How does Quora help you achieve this?
Preset Writing Prompts
With more than 1.
5 million questions available on Quora, Quora has begun to streamline questions to users based on their most popular or sought out categories.
These answers are often short – no more than two to three paragraphs, with far less pressure to create an emulation of a New York Times editorial.
The “Questions for You” tab enables you to answer questions based on your recent answers: My last four answers on Quora were about Bernie Sanders, Swarm, and the NFL – this triggered an algorithm that brought topics I was passionate about to my attention.
One of the biggest barriers I hear when it comes to writing consistently is “I have writer’s block” or ‘I have no idea what to write about”.
With preset writing prompts, all you have to do is look at a question already proposed to inspire new opinions and ideas.
Many of these short answers can be turned into riveting long-form blogs.
Opportunities For Reading and Learning
One of the biggest lessons I learned from one of my favorite authors, James Altucher: "You can’t write without first reading.
A lot.
"
Compared to every question I respond to on Quora, I read about 10-15 answers.
With more than 200 people I regularly follow, I read everything from life hacks to thoughts on the Donald Trump presidential campaign.
I read high quality answers from experts as well as short answers from Reddit addicts.
While I don’t have enough time in the day to read full-length books, my Quora app allows me to shift rather quickly through a number of questions during a commute or before bed.
Reading many different answers gives you immediate exposure to different authors, styles of writing, sentence structures and vocabularies.
The stream-of-consciousness approach I use in many of my blogs comes from the number of answers I’ve enjoyed reading on Quora.
Writing growth cannot be a selfish pursuit – it has to be cultivated through constant exposure and acknowledgement of quality when you see it.
It has to be cultivated through learning and compounding upon your preconceptions of ideas.
This is where reading becomes essential.
No Permission Needed
My biggest self-doubts as a writer first came from rejections – editors saying that the writing wasn’t good or the idea wasn’t creative enough.
While I do concede that some of the writing may have been absolute garbage, rejection is certainly a self-esteem poison.
Many times, it made me want to quit writing forever.
With Quora, all you need to do to be regarded as a writer is have a Quora account.
Nobody needs to approve your post.
Nobody needs to validate your writing before you put it out there.
The more you answer on a specific topic, the more you begin to build trust amongst a niche group of readers.
Because it removes the anonymous veil of Reddit, you can also connect your social profiles and blogs to Quora – real people will notice you in real –time.
This is a tremendous boost for confidence.
Measurable Statistics
Having measurable statistics as a first-time writer or a seasoned veteran is a blessing – it allows you to see which of your answers are attracting attention and allows you to clarify what people are enjoying.
In a way, it’s a form of multivariate analysis – whenever I find one answer that gets more views than another, I always try to investigate why.
Was it the shock value? The vocabulary? The call to action? Finding your niche as a writer is tough – it helps to see evidence of where you’re reaching your audience.
Self-Enforced Grammar Checks
You can't be a better biker with training wheels and you can't become a better writer with the proverbial shackles of automatic grammar refinement.
While writing in Microsoft Word can lend itself to efficient grammar checks, writing in Quora is almost a liberation.
Be comfortable with letting go.
You’re free of the risk that your creative sentence may be a fragment or your conversational language is breaking every violation of English grammar.
While some may frown at lack of rigid structure, I praise the freedom it gives you to be your own boss.
You will grasp grammar better when you read it for yourself and sound it out, instead of blindly lending the beauty of your writing to be eroded by Microsoft Word's grammar machines.
It will condition you to avoid mistakes instead of anticipating them.
If all else fails, there is still spell check.

Immediate Value
My very first blog post I wrote in college got exactly zero hits.
It was all about how to best learn Spanish.
I wanted to help people.
The zero hits certainly discouraged The best part about Quora's transactional nature is that every answer you write is in response to a question.
Simply by writing or sharing your thoughts, you are helping another human being in real-time as well as others following that same question.
Any advice you give, enlightening opinion you share, or story you write is immediately given back to the person who proposed the question in the first place.
If your goal with writing is to help or impact people, there is no more evident or encouraging way to know you've made an impact than Quora.
Improving your writing is a journey that, like any other form of art, takes practice, iteration, and confidence.
Don't be nervous about strangers or mistakes.
Don't be afraid to let yourself be consumed by the writing of others.
I'm still not where I'd love to be but I'm trying to inch the gap closer and plan to write on Quora once every other day.
You should set this goal for yourself as well!

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

Numerous people struggle with writing in English.
It has nothing to do with writing itself, but with the skills you need to have when it comes to writing in English.
It can really be a real challenge to improve.
However, there is no need to worry.
These are several vital tips that can help you improve your English writing skills.
It will indeed take you some time, but it will be worth it.
At least it turned out to be pretty fine for me.
I even got awarded and became a
Translating is merely taking something that you've written in a way that's clear to you, and reworking it subtly to make it clear for other people.
Sometimes you need to do it, sometimes you don't- but it's something all writers should be able to do.
You should also find (or make up) your own writing exercises that you do regularly.
They don't have to be particularly long- just long enough to prime your brain by playing with words.
Maybe write three totally alliterative sentences, or do a stream of conscious poem, or create a character using nothing but the elements on your desk, or even a brief journal entry (never underestimate the power of katharsis).
Just fun stuff to get your brain working.
Just like the body needs a good stretching and a light warm up before working out, our brains need the same thing.
It flushes us and helps to get the "bad words" out, so that when we sit down to write the real thing, we're using the "good words.
"
And last, but not least, remember that all of these are just guidelines.
Use them to structure your own, personal, methods of writing development and content proficiency.
There are several universal practices for becoming more skilled in writing content (many of which I mentioned), but the golden ticket is yours alone to discover.
Only you can find out what works for you.
.
.
but when you do, it's like striking oil and your pen will truly be your greatest ally.
But you can only find that out.
.
.
by writing.
May the words be with you!
###

I discovered a best answer for this question from Onboardly
How to Become a Better Storyteller in 30 Days
Day 1 – Find a space to write
If you are a paper-person, get a journal.
Some of my personal favorites include the ever-esteemed
Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I agree with EVERY SINGLE THING Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I agree with EVERY SINGLE THING Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I agree with EVERY SINGLE THING Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by Translating is merely taking something that you've written in a way that's clear to you, and reworking it subtly to make it clear for other people.
Sometimes you need to do it, sometimes you don't- but it's something all writers should be able to do.
You should also find (or make up) your own writing exercises that you do regularly.
They don't have to be particularly long- just long enough to prime your brain by playing with words.
Maybe write three totally alliterative sentences, or do a stream of conscious poem, or create a character using nothing but the elements on your desk, or even a brief journal entry (never underestimate the power of katharsis).
Just fun stuff to get your brain working.
Just like the body needs a good stretching and a light warm up before working out, our brains need the same thing.
It flushes us and helps to get the "bad words" out, so that when we sit down to write the real thing, we're using the "good words.
"
And last, but not least, remember that all of these are just guidelines.
Use them to structure your own, personal, methods of writing development and content proficiency.
There are several universal practices for becoming more skilled in writing content (many of which I mentioned), but the golden ticket is yours alone to discover.
Only you can find out what works for you.
.
.
but when you do, it's like striking oil and your pen will truly be your greatest ally.
But you can only find that out.
.
.
by writing.
May the words be with you!
###

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source:
[1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I agree with EVERY SINGLE THING Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I agree with EVERY SINGLE THING Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by Translating is merely taking something that you've written in a way that's clear to you, and reworking it subtly to make it clear for other people.
Sometimes you need to do it, sometimes you don't- but it's something all writers should be able to do.
You should also find (or make up) your own writing exercises that you do regularly.
They don't have to be particularly long- just long enough to prime your brain by playing with words.
Maybe write three totally alliterative sentences, or do a stream of conscious poem, or create a character using nothing but the elements on your desk, or even a brief journal entry (never underestimate the power of katharsis).
Just fun stuff to get your brain working.
Just like the body needs a good stretching and a light warm up before working out, our brains need the same thing.
It flushes us and helps to get the "bad words" out, so that when we sit down to write the real thing, we're using the "good words.
"
And last, but not least, remember that all of these are just guidelines.
Use them to structure your own, personal, methods of writing development and content proficiency.
There are several universal practices for becoming more skilled in writing content (many of which I mentioned), but the golden ticket is yours alone to discover.
Only you can find out what works for you.
.
.
but when you do, it's like striking oil and your pen will truly be your greatest ally.
But you can only find that out.
.
.
by writing.
May the words be with you!
###

Let’s not beat around the bush with a panoply of creative hacks that promise to turn you into a writer over night, because most of them are frivolous and will wane off before you even start writing.
Let’s just stick to the basics, shall we?
Experiencing – Experimenting – Engaging.

Image :
Sayonara!

I discovered a best answer for this question from Onboardly
How to Become a Better Storyteller in 30 Days
Day 1 – Find a space to write
If you are a paper-person, get a journal.
Some of my personal favorites include the ever-esteemed You can see my Korean name Hyun Seok (현석) on the read diary.
2.
Understand Culture
– So much of communication is rooted in culture.
When you are showing interest in someone’s culture, you are saying “I am curious about you” and “You are interesting”.
Good writing starts with curiosity about the people and events around you and how they affect one another.
If you are not curious about your surroundings, it is hard to create good writing.
3.
Voice Record
– Do you remember the last time you had the “A-Ha!” moment but forgot that next great idea that would change the world? Your voice recorder would not only be a great hedge to mitigate such risk, but a real-time journal you can scribe at your leisure.
Use this as an advantage and an extension of your journals for great note taking and to flush out thoughts.
4.
Grammar
– Great writing is about great editing.
I don’t always pay 100% attention to grammar when I post on social media such as Quora or LinkedIn, but when it comes to major publications this is a completely different story.
(I didn’t get the nickname Grammar Police” for no reason) You want your grammar to be impeccable.
Misplaces modifiers, subject-verb errors, or run-ons, not only make your case much less credible but it can also confuse the reader when explaining your thoughts.
The stronger your grammar, the more risk you can take in your writing because it will less ambiguous in nature.
A great book is The Elements of Style by Strunk and White.
I read the book 3 times and it helped quite a bit.
In 18 years, I went from a F.
O.
B.
disinterested in school because of my language limitations to now a contributor for major outlets such as Forbes, Inc, CNBC and bestselling author.
I believe with the right mindset and the right approach, anyone can achieve the success I enjoyed.
It will take time, patience, and deliberate but with the right mindset, I believe anyone can achieve what I have accomplished.

After covering various questions related to spoken English, I finally get to answer the writing part.
Thank you, Ravi, for inviting me to sweep away your doubts.
If you want to improve your writing, get ready to do some work.
Tips:
P.
S: I sense that you want the answer to be from the IELTS perspective.
Do tell us?
For the IELTS writing part, I can help you a great deal.
I have helped many students, including my first cousin, who is in Ontario.

I can give you 3 lessons and 5 exercises to help improve your written English language skills.
Ready?
Here we go…
Read each of the following 3 lessons several times until you learn them by heart:
Lesson 1 – Yes:
“Yes, My English language skills are fine, and I don’t care what the world thinks about it”
Lesson 2 – I can:
“English is just another language used for communication.
Being fluent in English does not make a person any smarter or more intelligent.
I can add will, like many others like me”
Lesson 3 – Do it:
“I will communicate in English whenever I get an opportunity, without the fear of being laughed at or corrected.
I resolve to do it”
These lessons might sound trivial, but they work.
They will boost your confidence and prepare you for the exercises.
Ready for the exercises?
Here we go…
Exercise 1 – Listen:
Listen to English language radio channels (news and talk shows).
If such radio programs are not available in your region, subscribe to podcasts.
Spend several hours every week just listening to English content of your choice (avoid songs).
Exercise 2 – Read:
Read printed and on line material as much as you can.
Do not skip a word or a sentence just because it is too hard to digest.
Find its meaning before you move on.
Read novels written by renowned authors.
Exercise 3 – Speak:
If a person communicates with you in English, make sure you communicate back in English.
Put yourself in a company that speaks English.
You must speak the language for at least an hour every day.
Exercise 4 – Write:
Write answers on Quora.
Write emails.
Compose messages on whatsapp and twitter instead of just sharing jokes.
Write a blog entry.
Write really long essays.
Before you publish your content, proof read it at least two times.
Exercise 5 – Repeat:
Repeat above 4 exercises.
When you reach a state of self doubt, which you often will, revisit the lessons.
Re-read your old content whenever you get a chance.
You will notice that every time you read your content, you are modifying it to make it sound better.
This is progress!
Look, my written English skills are not perfect, however it does not bother me; because I know that my skills are getting better, and that’s what matters most.
If you read my really old answers and compare them to the newer one’s you will be convinced that this system actually works!

Writing and Speaking like a native.

Learning to write is a language skill that can be the most difficult to master.
Even in your native language, writing is a skill that can only be developed with continued practice and learning various styles.
Writing in English is not different.
Learning to write begins with understanding the grammar structure of the language.
Think of grammar as the rules of writing.
The next thing is vocabulary.
Words are the building blocks of writing.
Learning how to use words opens up the world to the writer to express the thought he is trying to convey.
Finally, beyond writing simple text, writing is a craft that needs to be honed.
If you are confident in your level of English, take some writing courses that will allow you to express your thoughts.

Keep doing what you do the best and write the diary.
But don't only rely on that … write on social issues, write on your feelings…and try to experiment by changing the tone of your writing everyday ( like admiring tone, angry, satirical, critical .
.
anything that you can)
4.
Last but not the least.
Have someone read them

Yeah once you are comfortable and confident enough you should allow others to read them and have a positive criticism on your articles.
Not only will it amaze you about getting a hold of variety of opinion and constructive brainstorming but most importantly it'll build your confidence.
And mark my words “ Confidence is the key my friend”.
Good luck in your endeavours! :)

I would find someone to help you who has these skills.
Once you have written something, they should not only make the corrections, but they should do this on your written page, so you can see what changes they made.
If you can team up with someone at work, that will do nicely.

Even better is to get two such persons, have them each make corrections or changes and then compare.

Talented editors are rare.
They are usually persons who read widely, care about grammar and spelling, and are very particular.

It also might help to see which style book that your work uses.

Chicago manual of style, New York times manual of style.
These will go into detail about what is acceptable, what is not acceptable and what are the preferred ways to do things.
Another way to approach your writing is to work at it on the sentence level.
A great book to learn to do this is The Art of Styling Sentences: 20 Patterns for Success

To do this method you learn patterns, and then make up your own.
Here are the ten I teach my writing students.

1.
One word sentences.
Examples: Stop! Who? No.

2.
Questions.
Who did you say she was? Where are you going? Did you see that?
3.
2-5 word sentences.
Don't do that again.
Sit up.
Go away, you freak! She said that?

4.
Two ideas attached by a semicolon instead of and or but.
She cooks dinner; I do the dishes.
I rob banks; she drives the getaway car.

5.
Sentence within a sentence set off by dashes.
My father – who was born in Chicago – loved deep dish pizza.
Babe Ruth – who hit more home runs than anyone else in his time – liked to drink and dance and stay out all night.

6.
Simple sentence.
She never gets to school on time.

7.
Dependent clause, simple sentence.
Because she can never wake up early enough, she always arrives late to work.
After the school bus passed, he was left by himself.

8.
Dialogue: "Are you kidding me?" she asked.
"John never has time to eat breakfast," said Mr.
Hanson, "which is why he is always starving by the time lunch rolls around.
"

9.
Twos.
Bob and Ted are my best friends.
She ate breakfast then went to school.
She eats and she sleeps.
  and
Threes.
She goes to school, eats lunch, and then comes home and takes a nap.
Bob, Fred and Ted are the three best players on the team.
She can talk, do her makeup and mess with her phone all at once.

10: List following a colon.
She made breakfast: oatmeal, eggs, bacon, toast, grits, ham, sausage, cereal, pancakes, waffles and coffee.
He found a pile in his drawer: 13 pennies, a brush, two bus tickets, a two dollar and a twenty dollar bill, 4 Hershey's kisses and 26 ancient valentine's day heart candies in a plastic bag.

There are other sentence patterns, well worth learning, but since I teach elementary kids, I stick with these ten.
Do each of the patterns 5-6 times daily for six months, and you will see them become part of your writing.
You will begin to notice them used by the pro writers who write for great magazines and newspapers like the NY Times, National Geographic, Sports Illustrated, etc.

Once you can easily do six samples of each, try this exercise.
Take a sentence, the imagine what would come after it, or before it and after it.
She made breakfast.

That morning when she woke up she had the strangest feeling, like something bad was about to happen.

She made breakfast.

As she did, she kept looking up, expecting the phone to ring or a policeman to burst through the door, or a siren to sound.

But there was nothing but the barking of dogs and the distant hum of the city.

Another exercise to try is to show rather than tell.
Tell: He robbed a bank.

Show.
He pushed open the dusty glass door and stepped inside.
Each footstep echoed back hollowly from the far wall.
An ancient ceiling fan buzzed and whirred lazily, send up flies that rose and then settled again.

Dust motes floated down in the shaft of yellow light that came in through the one tall floor to ceiling window.

A bank guard nodded and went back to listening to the ball game on his phone.

He waited his turn in line, and when he finally got to the front, took the note from his front pocket, pushed it under the glass partition.
He set the package, which ticked loudly, onto the ledge and leaned forward.

The red headed cashier – a fat woman about fifty with fiery ringlets straight out of a dye box – read the note and wide eyed, looked up at him.

"I'd like all the money.
But no dye packets.
Leave those out.
And no pressing buttons.
Understand?" he hissed.

She gulped, nodded, and began counting out packs of twenties and one hundreds, her wide eyes never leaving the ticking package.

The two in line behind him, a fat man and a thin, tiny grandmother, shifted their feet, bored, waiting for him to finish.

Another exercise: Five paragraph essay.
Tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them using three lines of argument, then tell them what you told them.

Prompt: Should football be banned in high school?
Response (An example of the five paragraph essay) : I think that football should be banned, as funadamentally unsafe, not only in junior and senior high schol but until an athlete reaches age twenty one.

As the recent movie Concussion showed, if you play football, you will likely damage your brain and that damage is irreversible.
Sixty Minutes recently quoted an expert on helmet to helmet collisions.
This expert worked with the NFL until the NFL tooks his findings and hid them.
But by working with a number of high school football teams over a number of years, he came to this startling conclusion: the average high school football payer has 650 helmet to helmet collisions each season.
You do not have to have a concussion to damage your brain.
Small collisions rattle the brain around in your skull, and cumulatively, damage the brain.

Moreover, students below the age of 21 are being used for other entertainment before they are old enough to decide if they wish to participate.
Though they might agree, or even want to play in their teen or pre teen years, they are too young to agree.
Further, their brains are not yet developed enough for them to make wise decisions.

But most importantly, football is designed to be violent, and helmets are designed to hurt.
Football could have – as boxing has done – designed a helmet that was both protective and outwardly soft.
Instead they chose a hard plastic design that, like a weapon, almost encourages helmet to helmet collisions.

Because football irreversibly damages brains, because that damage is cumulative, because the helmet is designed to hurt and encourage collsions and because students below the age of 21 don't have sufficiently developed brains or decision making capabilities, football should be banned until an athlete reaches the age of twenty one.

Learn the 10, or better yet 20 forms, practice them daily for 6-12 months.
Learn to show rather than tell.
Learn to expand one sentence into a number of sentences.
Learn and master the 5 paragraph essay.
Do all of these and you will go a long way towards vastly improving your English writing.

You may be reading a lot as you have described, but are you writing a lot?
In a nut shell, have you considered your production: consumption ratio, in your reading and writing initiatives?
Nonetheless, I like to share some practical approaches with you, based on my fast and versatile reading and writing experiences:
1)  Read, read, and read widely, and deeply, both mainstream and the  fringe: newspapers, magazines, newsletters, all types of novels, business books, literary and scholarly works, and even bill boards, wall posters, merchandising displays, ad blurbs, and  mailshots, online as well as offline;
2) Maintain a roving eye for interesting words  or phrases or sentences, in (1) and see how they are strung masterfully  together to express ideas or messages eloquently and succinctly across  to the reader;
3) While reading your daily newspaper, pay particular attention to three specific areas:
a) the editorials;
b) the economic analyses;
c) the political commentaries;

These  segments – with powerful word choices – are usually written by editors and senior journalists, with a  seemingly impeccable command of the English Language;
4) While watching movies or television programs, like news broadcasts, talk shows, sitcoms, debates on hot issues, interviews with VIPs, etc.
, maintain a roving eye and ear for interesting as well as intriguing dialogues or fun conversations;
5) Always keep a large note book handy to capture all the stuff in (1) to (4);
This initiative is called sentence mining;
6)  Write, write, and write, as much as you can, and make sure you use the  captured stuff in (5) to enliven your own everyday language expressions,  in emails  or blogs or reports or proposals, etc.
,in addition to helping you to  internalise the new vocabulary;
Moreover, writing voraciously also enhances your vocabulary and grammar;
[Tip: My good buddy based in Mumbai, India, Dilip Mukerjea, an accomplished author and also a strategy consultant, recommends writing every day, at least 500 to 1000 words, or more.
]
7) Use as much of the stuff you  have captured in (5) in your daily dynamic speaking activities, too:  conversations, dialogues, discussions, meetings, sales presentations or elevator pitches, web-casting, pod-casting, public speaking gigs, etc.
;
8) Just a slew of additional tips to power up your writing:
To   sum up my proposition,  the fire test of your writing prowess comes from  the  massive utility and consistent applications in your everyday life and/or workflow activities, involving real-world   communication with real people,  as much as possible.
[20160314_Writing]

Well, I had written this as a comment on an answer on this topic recently.
I was suggested to post this as an answer, so here you go
{with some updates}!
Exquisite writing in any language, let alone English, is an art-form which is not made up of a single component.
At first thought, the sundry advice to write a lot daily might seem like the sure thing; a no-brainer, right? … Wrong!
Just professing a person to write, write and write is not enough, in my humble opinion.
I believe,if you ever aim to write good stuff, you first got to read *good* stuff!
Not just the Good… The Best… The Classics… The Greats…
So, to be a seasoned or accomplished writer, one must needs be a voracious reader who submerges him/her self in the various genres of writing such as Literature, Poetry, Prose, One-liners, Jokes, Newspapers, Magazines, Comics, Scriptures, Couplets; devouring and savouring each bite of it.
Yummmmy!
Reading a lot of quotations and fables as well as {auto}biographies of famous people also build a great foundation.
Dive into Keats, Shakespeare, Ghalib, Mir, Tagore, Wordsworth, Benjamin Franklin, Byron, Oscar Wilde, Ayn Rand, Alexander Dumas, Sir Arthur Doyle, Khushwant Singh, Saki, Ruskin Bond…
But there are so many books, you ask! Which ones to read and which ones to leave? Well, then follow the advice of following gentleman who has done me no harm! :)
Time is a scarce commodity, you know! It hath wings and wheels… it flies!
“Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested!”
-Sir Francis Bacon
That is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
{Un}surprisingly, even if you read all this stuff, you could eventually become proficient at expressing your thoughts in black and white, but still one more essential ingredient would be missing to write truly great stuff which stands the tests of time….
*pain*
Deep reflective writing, where each word carries weight, comes from real life lessons and experiences from which a person has learned; the scars, the wounds, the ecstasies, the joys! The so-called inescapable slings and arrows of outrageous fortune!
You may liken it to how Janardhan Jakhar aka “JJ”, the protagonist of the movie Rockstar (2011)[1] wandered from pillar to post to fathom why his music, his voice did not have a soul… “Where do I get this elusive pain?”, he exclaimed!
His music… his voice… his words… did not touch the hearts of the listeners till the day he endured a heartbreak.
{ In no way am I suggesting you go around people asking for betrayal and heartbreaks… :) You won’t have to ask for it and it doesn’t spare anyone! }
I believe, the Pen just flows when you got a tale to tell… When you can’t keep it inside you anymore… It seems effortless at that moment, but it is the culmination of 1000s of hours of reading and life experiences.
The vessel of the mind just bursts into a beautiful fountain when the time is right…
So, my humble advise to fellow quorans, by all means write but also don’t forget to *read* and *live life*! :) God bless!
And yes Travel, Travel, Travel! You need life experiences!
As they say, “The world’s a book and those who don’t travel, read only a page!”

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some tips you might find handy, given they have been helping me all along:
I hope my answer helps! :)
Happy Writing! :)

Here are some tips which I learned while learning a new language other than English.
The basic rules of learning remain the same.
It is ‘dedication’ that you would require to reach a good level in any language.

WRITING
1.
Grammar Matters!
When learning a new language, always make sure that you are thorough with the grammar.
It is the root of learning any language.
Form basic sentences in which you target the usage of specific parts of speech extensively.
For example, consider the connecting word, “therefore”, and see how the first part of the sentence (main clause) is connected with the second part of the sentence (sub-clause)
Eg.
I like being creative therefore I write answers on Quora.

This could have also been written as:
I write answers on Quora because I like being creative.

Pick up some basic grammar book for kids, and brush up your basics.
2.
Vocabulary Matters!
Most of the time when you want to convey a message quickly, you must have a good command on words.
If you don’t have access to a quick vocabulary in your mind, then you would stammer and end up saying
“That species of ahh reptiles is called ahh lizards!”
I learnt vocabulary through a tool called MEMBEAN Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some tips you might find handy, given they have been helping me all along:
I hope my answer helps! :)
Happy Writing! :)

Here are some tips which I learned while learning a new language other than English.
The basic rules of learning remain the same.
It is ‘dedication’ that you would require to reach a good level in any language.

WRITING
1.
Grammar Matters!
When learning a new language, always make sure that you are thorough with the grammar.
It is the root of learning any language.
Form basic sentences in which you target the usage of specific parts of speech extensively.
For example, consider the connecting word, “therefore”, and see how the first part of the sentence (main clause) is connected with the second part of the sentence (sub-clause)
Eg.
I like being creative therefore I write answers on Quora.

This could have also been written as:
I write answers on Quora because I like being creative.

Pick up some basic grammar book for kids, and brush up your basics.
2.
Vocabulary Matters!
Most of the time when you want to convey a message quickly, you must have a good command on words.
If you don’t have access to a quick vocabulary in your mind, then you would stammer and end up saying
“That species of ahh reptiles is called ahh lizards!”
I learnt vocabulary through a tool called MEMBEAN Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by Translating is merely taking something that you've written in a way that's clear to you, and reworking it subtly to make it clear for other people.
Sometimes you need to do it, sometimes you don't- but it's something all writers should be able to do.
You should also find (or make up) your own writing exercises that you do regularly.
They don't have to be particularly long- just long enough to prime your brain by playing with words.
Maybe write three totally alliterative sentences, or do a stream of conscious poem, or create a character using nothing but the elements on your desk, or even a brief journal entry (never underestimate the power of katharsis).
Just fun stuff to get your brain working.
Just like the body needs a good stretching and a light warm up before working out, our brains need the same thing.
It flushes us and helps to get the "bad words" out, so that when we sit down to write the real thing, we're using the "good words.
"
And last, but not least, remember that all of these are just guidelines.
Use them to structure your own, personal, methods of writing development and content proficiency.
There are several universal practices for becoming more skilled in writing content (many of which I mentioned), but the golden ticket is yours alone to discover.
Only you can find out what works for you.
.
.
but when you do, it's like striking oil and your pen will truly be your greatest ally.
But you can only find that out.
.
.
by writing.
May the words be with you!
###

Let’s not beat around the bush with a panoply of creative hacks that promise to turn you into a writer over night, because most of them are frivolous and will wane off before you even start writing.
Let’s just stick to the basics, shall we?
Experiencing – Experimenting – Engaging.

Image :
Sayonara!

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
[1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
How can I improve my writing skills:
This method works wonders when you read & write daily.
Don’t say you don’t have time for it: already by reading for half an hour and writing for ten minutes every day, you will see your writing improving within few weeks.
Concerning the know-how, you shouldn’t obsess with theory: just take a course or read a good book, then get back to the practice.
The peer-feedback can be practiced with a group of writers, or at least one other writer who is also determined to get better.
Here, you could establish regular meetings or a regular schedule for feedbacking each other’s texts that fits to your life (weekly/bi-weekly/monthly).

I discovered a best answer for this question from Onboardly
How to Become a Better Storyteller in 30 Days
Day 1 – Find a space to write
If you are a paper-person, get a journal.
Some of my personal favorites include the ever-esteemed Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
How can I improve my writing skills:
This method works wonders when you read & write daily.
Don’t say you don’t have time for it: already by reading for half an hour and writing for ten minutes every day, you will see your writing improving within few weeks.
Concerning the know-how, you shouldn’t obsess with theory: just take a course or read a good book, then get back to the practice.
The peer-feedback can be practiced with a group of writers, or at least one other writer who is also determined to get better.
Here, you could establish regular meetings or a regular schedule for feedbacking each other’s texts that fits to your life (weekly/bi-weekly/monthly).

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
How can I improve my writing skills:
This method works wonders when you read & write daily.
Don’t say you don’t have time for it: already by reading for half an hour and writing for ten minutes every day, you will see your writing improving within few weeks.
Concerning the know-how, you shouldn’t obsess with theory: just take a course or read a good book, then get back to the practice.
The peer-feedback can be practiced with a group of writers, or at least one other writer who is also determined to get better.
Here, you could establish regular meetings or a regular schedule for feedbacking each other’s texts that fits to your life (weekly/bi-weekly/monthly).

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
How can I improve my writing skills:
This method works wonders when you read & write daily.
Don’t say you don’t have time for it: already by reading for half an hour and writing for ten minutes every day, you will see your writing improving within few weeks.
Concerning the know-how, you shouldn’t obsess with theory: just take a course or read a good book, then get back to the practice.
The peer-feedback can be practiced with a group of writers, or at least one other writer who is also determined to get better.
Here, you could establish regular meetings or a regular schedule for feedbacking each other’s texts that fits to your life (weekly/bi-weekly/monthly).

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
How can I improve my writing skills:
This method works wonders when you read & write daily.
Don’t say you don’t have time for it: already by reading for half an hour and writing for ten minutes every day, you will see your writing improving within few weeks.
Concerning the know-how, you shouldn’t obsess with theory: just take a course or read a good book, then get back to the practice.
The peer-feedback can be practiced with a group of writers, or at least one other writer who is also determined to get better.
Here, you could establish regular meetings or a regular schedule for feedbacking each other’s texts that fits to your life (weekly/bi-weekly/monthly).

I discovered a best answer for this question from Onboardly
How to Become a Better Storyteller in 30 Days
Day 1 – Find a space to write
If you are a paper-person, get a journal.
Some of my personal favorites include the ever-esteemed Jereme Allison and Christian Ortmann wrote in their answers.
I merely want to add:
I harp on proofreading so much because I have tried to help several people over the years who were talented but paid too little attention to the details to express that talent well.
Writing well is an art and a skill; the art is improved by critically reading well-written material and the skill by writing your own creations.
Both aspects only improve with practice, practice, practice.
But it does get easier and better with repeated effort until it becomes rewarding.
.
.
EDIT: After reading {Pete Monaghan's answer} I recommend taking it as gospel.
ANOTHER EDIT: I just realized that since I consult this {Stefanie Chan's answer} also suggests it; it is clear, concise, and searchable.

How can I improve my English writing skills?

I don’t know if I want to be a writer or not but I think being able to write something that people want to read is kind of cool, so I made a decision to try.
I am not a native and English is my second language but I think it’s fine to make just some grammar mistakes while trying to write something at the beginning.
I started to write regularly on Quora since early this year and I.
After nearly a year, I found out that I have improved a lot.
Now, I read my very first answers on Quora and compare to my recent ones and make a smile on how much I have gone in the way I write, words I use, how many grammars mistakes I make, how long it takes me to write an article and how to express my idea and my feeling through another language.
There are two parts of this question: writing and writing using English, so I try to write an answer based on my experiences.
Forging your own writing is a work that no one would ever watch your shoulders and punish you if you don’t do it.
So, you see that it is not a must or priority, and you maybe very easy to fall into “lazy and hesitation” area to start.
So, it is just you who take responsibility if you really want to enhance your skills.
Being able to finish something is more important than trying to make it perfect and never complete.
When you want to learn new things or master at any skill, discipline is the first and foremost thing you need to commit to yourself only, saving a space in your mind and time in your day for writing or whatever skill you want to improve.
Lots say that they want to improve their English writing skill but they never really put their mind, their heart and their time into it.
2.
Read English with attention and learn from what your read

If you want to upgrade your writing, you will not just read but you should take notes everything you find interesting while reading and pay attention to grammar, words, concept and structures
Do not worry if you cannot learn new words right away or remember those grammar rules immediately, if you are patient and do them consistently, they will gradually become your own vocabulary, grammar and knowledge.
3.
Keep a notebook by your side as if it is your best friend

Cool like this:
Image source: [1] and writing advice [2] read my previous answers]
Some quick tips from the internet( With my twist) which have helped me a lot.
[3]
Practice more, and writing becomes a joy.
[4]
Some of my tips.
Keep a pen and a little book with you.
Always.
Pen down everything you observe.
Example : You are travelling via car and notice trees running past you.
Write what you observe.
Benefit: You will be able to find the correct words to explain each situation in your story/article.
You must know how a little comma changes the entire meaning.
Age old example:
The criminal, says the judge, should be hanged.
The criminal says, the judge should be hanged.
Benefit : Your readers can understand well and you can portray the correct meaning.
[5]

Here are some secrets of professional writers that I recommend:
Avoid clichés
But you know that, don’t you? And yet clichés are more systemic and invasive then people imagine.
A cliché is any idea or expression that has lost its force through overuse, to the point where it becomes meaningless and drab.
Here are some examples that I have found in recent blogs:In this day and ageNever a dull momentGiven the green lightRose to great heightsCalm before the stormThe problem, and the attraction, with clichés is that they seem to say exactly what we want to say, so it is tempting to hang on to these tried and true expressions.
And yet, they will deaden your prose, make readers mentally sign off and expose you as an amateur.

Happy Writing! :)

I was a certified bad writer.
I even had documentation to prove it.
Literally, legal documentation was ordered to confirm how terrible my skills were, I suppose, just in case anyone challenged this truth.
My parents, or the school, or somebody paid thousands of dollars to have me tested, and then I became a certified bad writer.
The document confirming my terrible skills was an IEP.
Ironically, I would have admitted I sucked at writing for a lot cheaper, but nobody asked me! Whatever.
We pay people to tell us what we already know every day, so no shame there.
To paint the picture further, I went from Kindergarten through 12th grade with about 1700 people, give or take.
If there was a list of writers from best to worst, I would have been dead last.
This does not bode well with college acceptance committees.
Therefore, all of my friends went away to college, and I went local to become ahermit.
During the first two years of college, I did three things: I read, I wrote, and I exercised.
Photo by Helloquence
My life was disproportionately focused on improving my skillset.
Being bad at math, too, I did not understand how to increase my skills.
I thought more practice would add up to improve my overall skill (1+1+1+1=4), but I wrong.
Overall skill, in fact, is exponential (1+2+4+8+16=31).
The growth of skill tends to be exponential on the front end and incremental on the back.
This is not to say I’m so grand a writer, but it is to say that by applying the skills below, you can be.
Some are great performers, some are great teachers, and few are both.
I don’t know if either apply to me, but what I do know is that each technique below increased my writing skill dramatically (Meaning when others read my writing, they don’t immediately question if English is my primary language, anymore).
1.
Become a murderer
Kill that filtering voice inside your head.
Unfilter and unleash the creator within you.
Edit after.
2.
Grab your reader’s attention
In any story, start with the most intense part- the arc.
Start there no matter where it lays on the storyline: beginning, middle, or end.
PS- This tip works amazingly for verbal storytelling, as well (“Did I tell you about the time I got hit by a car?”)
3.
Shorter is better
The Flesch-Kincaid Score, developed by The Navy in 1975, calculates the readability level of writing.
Simply put, there are two parts to the Flesch-Kincaid readability test: The Flesch reading-ease (determines how easy something is to read) and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (determines the years of education one must have in order to understand a text).
Scoring a 5.
1, means that your written text is at a 5th grade level.
Now the question remains, do you want to write at a low-grade readability level or a high-grade readability level? Think about your audience.
To give you an idea from the article by
You can see my Korean name Hyun Seok (현석) on the read diary.
2.
Understand Culture
– So much of communication is rooted in culture.
When you are showing interest in someone’s culture, you are saying “I am curious about you” and “You are interesting”.
Good writing starts with curiosity about the people and events around you and how they affect one another.
If you are not curious about your surroundings, it is hard to create good writing.
3.
Voice Record
– Do you remember the last time you had the “A-Ha!” moment but forgot that next great idea that would change the world? Your voice recorder would not only be a great hedge to mitigate such risk, but a real-time journal you can scribe at your leisure.
Use this as an advantage and an extension of your journals for great note taking and to flush out thoughts.
4.
Grammar
– Great writing is about great editing.
I don’t always pay 100% attention to grammar when I post on social media such as Quora or LinkedIn, but when it comes to major publications this is a completely different story.
(I didn’t get the nickname Grammar Police” for no reason) You want your grammar to be impeccable.
Misplaces modifiers, subject-verb errors, or run-ons, not only make your case much less credible but it can also confuse the reader when explaining your thoughts.
The stronger your grammar, the more risk you can take in your writing because it will less ambiguous in nature.
A great book is The Elements of Style by Strunk and White.
I read the book 3 times and it helped quite a bit.
In 18 years, I went from a F.
O.
B.
disinterested in school because of my language limitations to now a contributor for major outlets such as Forbes, Inc, CNBC and bestselling author.
I believe with the right mindset and the right approach, anyone can achieve the success I enjoyed.
It will take time, patience, and deliberate but with the right mindset, I believe anyone can achieve what I have accomplished.

After covering various questions related to spoken English, I finally get to answer the writing part.
Thank you, Ravi, for inviting me to sweep away your doubts.
If you want to improve your writing, get ready to do some work.
Tips:
P.
S: I sense that you want the answer to be from the IELTS perspective.
Do tell us?
For the IELTS writing part, I can help you a great deal.
I have helped many students, including my first cousin, who is in Ontario.

I can give you 3 lessons and 5 exercises to help improve your written English language skills.
Ready?
Here we go…
Read each of the following 3 lessons several times until you learn them by heart:
Lesson 1 – Yes:
“Yes, My English language skills are fine, and I don’t care what the world thinks about it”
Lesson 2 – I can:
“English is just another language used for communication.
Being fluent in English does not make a person any smarter or more intelligent.
I can add will, like many others like me”
Lesson 3 – Do it:
“I will communicate in English whenever I get an opportunity, without the fear of being laughed at or corrected.
I resolve to do it”
These lessons might sound trivial, but they work.
They will boost your confidence and prepare you for the exercises.
Ready for the exercises?
Here we go…
Exercise 1 – Listen:
Listen to English language radio channels (news and talk shows).
If such radio programs are not available in your region, subscribe to podcasts.
Spend several hours every week just listening to English content of your choice (avoid songs).
Exercise 2 – Read:
Read printed and on line material as much as you can.
Do not skip a word or a sentence just because it is too hard to digest.
Find its meaning before you move on.
Read novels written by renowned authors.
Exercise 3 – Speak:
If a person communicates with you in English, make sure you communicate back in English.
Put yourself in a company that speaks English.
You must speak the language for at least an hour every day.
Exercise 4 – Write:
Write answers on Quora.
Write emails.
Compose messages on whatsapp and twitter instead of just sharing jokes.
Write a blog entry.
Write really long essays.
Before you publish your content, proof read it at least two times.
Exercise 5 – Repeat:
Repeat above 4 exercises.
When you reach a state of self doubt, which you often will, revisit the lessons.
Re-read your old content whenever you get a chance.
You will notice that every time you read your content, you are modifying it to make it sound better.
This is progress!
Look, my written English skills are not perfect, however it does not bother me; because I know that my skills are getting better, and that’s what matters most.
If you read my really old answers and compare them to the newer one’s you will be convinced that this system actually works!

Updated: 22.06.2019 — 12:51 pm

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