Does Quora pay users to answer questions Do people answer me with the goodness of their personality or because they get paid or both

Does Quora pay users to answer questions? Do people answer me with the goodness of their personality or because they get paid, or both?


The payment for answering questions in Quora is not with money.
  There are many ways in which I have been paid for answering questions.
  One is that some of the questions spark thoughts that I wouldn't otherwise have had that can help to improve my life.

Another is that the questions I choose to answer are more often than not ones that help me to learn more about a subject because of the extra thought and research I put into the answer and also because some of the feedback is insightful.

Another payment is in the forms of the "thanks" I've gotten from the OPs and others who've read the answers.
  This gives me the feeling that I'm being helpful in a larger community, and if this improves the world to any degree, I benefit.
  I just happen to be living in this world.

Answering challenging questions exercises my brain in ways that just have to be useful for a person of my age (68).

Speaking of which, as a retired person, it's nice to have things to do to fill time in useful ways, and it's best when the time spent is entirely under my control.

Finally, something that I realized long after receiving the other benefits listed above, was, as someone who is writing a book that deals with opportunistic learning, answering questions gives me practice in writing, and my track record in views and up votes could possibly be a plus in getting an agent and a publisher if I ever get around to trying.

The really great thing about all these payments is that they relate to intrinsic motivation and connections with other people.
  For those of us who have enough money to get by already, this is far better currency than money could ever be.


In China, there is a tide of “knowledge economy”(paying for the knowledge) rising now.
Like the consultants, those who have the specific knowledge get paid through answering questions.
What’s different is that depending on the internet, one answer can be heard by many people.

Here are some platforms.
(I don’t know whether you can open it~)
值乎 – 说点儿有用的
在行 – 领先的知识技能共享平台
分答 – 付费语音问答
问达 – 申请方 | 大学生活经验分享_学习心得_留学申请_职业发展
As a matter of fact that it’s in a initial stage, there are plenty of either large or small platforms,some big, some small, some online, some offline; some comprehensive, some just include specific areas such as IT or studying abroad.

Let me set zhihu (www.
zhihu.
com/zhi
) as an example.

(the home page)
(my VPN doesn’t work now, i will use google to translate the page when it works)
You can pay to someone to inspire him or her to answer your questions, the price varies from 1 yuan to over 100 yuan (according to exchange rate now, 1 dollar=6.
88 yuan).
Also, everyone can “overhear” the answer for 1 yuan, no matter how much it takes the questioner, and the money is divided equally between the questioner and the respondent.

The average time of answering is less than 1 minute.

Steve Shi in the pictures, answering questions about psychology, got ¥13265( $1927)in total for his answering 235 questions, that is 56 yuan for a question.
And the following respondent, a product manager, can get more than ¥100 for a question.
In consideration of the price of commodity of China, it really matters.
(In average, ¥1 in China is nearly equal to $1 in the U.
S.
)
It’s noteworthy that this product was launched just in April this year, resulting in a bunch of followers.
Which one will be the unicorn is unknown, whereas the tide of getting paid for your knowledge may be unalterable.


I answer because I love to help people and I want to help people the way people that answe my questions have helped me.
I love interacting on the platform with answers and questions.

You have to give to receive.

I never ever respond in a brash judgemental condescending toxic manner because of ego, superiority complex or entitlement.

I question some of the grumpy or counterproductive essay style circling answers that lead no where but back to my question with additional answers :-(
I try to contribute as much as I can, but seeing toxic condescending answers to questions can really be discouraging.
I’m fairly new to Quora.
I have a very thick skin with social media; but some people in these answers take rudeness and extremely inappropriate responses attempted to be arranged elegantly in “top writer format”, malicious tactics to redirect traffic from certain pages editing is taken to a whole new level of disgust.
I never expected this app to be so contradictory and condescending in tone.

I expected a professional collegiate/graduate school/doctorate tone but maybe that’s too much to ask.

It’s so refreshing to see answers to my questions in a professional collegiate format void of any condescending /judgmental or outright rude tone.
Without plagierism as well.

Is that too much ask?
Plagiarism needs to be addressed because i sometimes notice answers that don’t make sense in tone or structure; but look like a template with extravagant vocabulary insertions.
An odd pattern.

If I don’t like a question I see I simply keep scrolling.
Why become triggered over a simple question on a screen that that doesn’t have my name on it specifically? No one is forcing anyone to answer anything.

If I ask a question myself then I’m needing a second or third opinion or an answer altogether.
I do not type to waste the world’s time.

Ethics and morals need to be integrated into one’s contribution to Quora to some degree.

A mad house at times hahaa! (Yes, I just used “hahaa and had fun with a joke”; I do it here and there to protect my energy; spread positivity.

Ashley


Thanks for A2A.

Does Quora pay users to answer questions? Do people answer me with the goodness of their personality or because they get paid, or both?
I admit that, for some of the research that I do for certain answers, I wouldn’t mind getting paid for time and, yes, if some of us got paid on IQ points * number of answers we could give up our daytime jobs.

However, that I am not getting paid does not dissuade from sharing information that I already know.
People have finally learned to stop asking me for comparisons on a variety of laptops, simply because I now refuse to do the sort of searching that the person asking the question should be doing.
Yes, I’ll give an opinion based on my experience, but I’m not about to look up specifications for three different machines.

I have been pleasantly surprised by some of the questions routed my way that one would not normally expect (animals, optics, psychology etc.
) and, while I may not be an expert in these areas, I’m happy to provide an opinion based on what I do know.
Of course, there are some questions that can be answered validly in 100 different ways so opinions can then become valuable.

Also, there are some questions specifically directed toward me that I have to “pass” because the answer exceeds my current knowledge and, again, why am I searching on someone else’s behalf?
I enjoy answering questions that are intelligently put (even in bad English).
I have no objection when someone admits “idiocy” on a topic and is asking a really basic question.
Maybe the answers received help that person to nut out a larger more complex problem.

I have visited technical sites where people giving answers expect to be paid, and have found that the answers given are curt.
“It’s 2am at my end, and I want to know how to do this now, not be told I have to go and buy particular tools after the weekend, i.
e.
, please tell me how to achieve this with a bread knife instead of chasing down a spudger (a tool for cracking open snap-together cases).

That there is a sense of decorum and manners displayed on Quora, along with the ability to learn new things from other people’s answers, will always keep me coming back.

EDIT: 2016–07–05
I think if writers were to be paid for answering questions, such payment would have to rely on Upvotes, as direct payment would result in lower quality answers.




There’s Quora Knowledge Prize(s) where you get paid for a particular answer being considered particularly outstanding in a designated question that gets sponsored by third parties.

There’s also being part of the team that runs the official Quora account, who deliver answers about Quora policy as part of their job.
Perhaps some other members of the staff answer questions as part of their job, though I highly suspect this is done out of their own volition rather than doing it because they are required to do so (any confirmation of this hypothesis, Tatiana Estévez, Marc Bodnick, or Jonathan Brill?).

There’s organizational accounts which represent third party businesses and obviously someone within their staff gets paid to write their answers, but again this is not likely particularly high in their list of roles.
These employees are almost certainly social media managers who engage considerably more through more traditional platforms.

But OK, I guess the undertone of this question is “Can I get paid for answering questions on Quora if someone hires me to do so?”.
Perhaps, but don’t expect that gig to last for too long.
More likely than not, a company wanting to give that a try is seeing Quora as a promotional tool and the answers would quickly devolve into spam, which in turn would get you banned (again, Quora is not ideal for customer support nor engagement).

I mean, I guess it’s possible some organization could be smarter and get someone to answer questions properly and piggyback promotion onto that (say, the Centre Georges Pompidou paying someone to answer questions regarding artists whose work is at the museum housed within it), but honestly they’d more likely do such as thing as an event on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, etc.

Possible? Sure.
Likely? Definitely no.


Yes Quora pays me not exactly in terms of money but through other ways.

Quora Pays me by
   so you see I am getting paid indirectly.


The remarkable thing about Quora is that they don't charge us to participate.
 
Did you ever notice how freely people post extremely helpful websites? Years ago, when the web was first created, I wanted some lyrics from Disney songs.
  I was amazed to learn that someone had gone to the trouble of posting them, for free.
  It had been a lot of work.
Why did they bother?
I began to realize that the web offered a new venue for a natural human spirit of generosity, of sharing.
People love to help others.
It is a very deep instinct, and probably more responsible for our civilization than is generally recognized.
  We gain pleasure when we do it.

Wikipedia is also such a miracle.
It is amazing how good a job it does.
I grew up with the Encyclopedia Brittanica, and Wikipedia goes so far beyond it that it is amazing.
  Many people contribute to improving the Wikipedia web sites, just out of the pleasure they get in doing a good thing, in helping to create something so well-done.
Jimmy Wales should be given a Nobel Peace Prize.

Quora, in my mind, is the latest discovery of a method to extend this instinct to help others.
I am addicted.
If I have the right answer to a question, I really enjoy sharing it.
Unlike email, Quora shares the questions and answers with thousands of other people.
In fact, many people don't even realize that they have a question until they see someone else posting it.


I enjoy answering questions on Quora.

Plain and simple.

I have not been given any reward to do so nor is it a motivation to my response.

A little over ten years ago I was desperately bored and between careers, not just jobs, careers.
I was a poor typist and wanted to practice writing.
I found Yahoo Answers.
I responded to countless questions, it was a fun way to help two people out: myself and the person asking the question.

I never received anything more than that.
I often would get a glowing reply from the person on the other side and that was awesome for me.

The only drawback with YA was other members couldn't score my answer.
With Quora it's different.
In fact it's better, sometimes there are many angles to truth that must be considered.
When multiple responses are scored a simple favor becomes an enduring informational resource.

I'm going to wager that Quora has a future in solving the problems of knowledge, possibly AI.

I know Quora offers money for good questions but I'm not aware of money offered for answers.
I think this monetization would open up avenues of exploitation.
It is more difficult in my opinion to formulate a useful and unique question than a really good answer.


Here's another perspective:
I'm really, really glad Quora doesn't pay users to answer questions.

I read people like Alex Tabarrok and Richard Muller frequently, and chat with them occasionally.
I also answer questions, although never in as in-depth a way as they do, nor do I have the specific mastery of a particular subject that comes with a PhD and a lifetime of study.
I'm decently well educated and can speak intelligently on a number of topics, but I'm not a professor of anything.
(Yet?) In my favour, I do have a thing for one-liners.
I don't, however, have that expert appeal that garners thousands of followers.

I basically get to trade my answers, of whatever quality you consider them, for the answers of people who are experts in their field and who students (indirectly) regularly pay megabucks in tuition to have as undergrad-level teachers.

I'm winning this exchange.
I see no reason to interfere with it.


Well, I cannot put it better than Nick Kitchener, or in a less facetious vein, Dushka Zapata, but I suppose to some extent I also answer questions here because it is an opportunity to have a "reputation".
  I get most of my private business from referrals of people I already know in town, but nowadays people often turn to Google to look up more information about attorneys.

So I needed an "online presence".
  I got burned with an outfit that wanted to run a web-site for me—charged me an arm and a leg and it resulted in no additional business.
  Quora is not a marketing site, and I do not "market" on Quora (or anywhere, really), but still, now if someone Googles my name, they'll have something to find that tells them something about me, instead of a bland law office website.

It'd be nice if Quora would pay us, but considering it doesn't have any revenue, I think that would be an unsustainable business model.
  So I'll take my reward in satisfaction.

And of course I guess I kind of like to show off!


Nope!
I write here as a hobby.
I enjoy writing, people seem to like reading and it's interesting to see other people's views.

If I were to get paid, it would be from the ads in answers.
An overestimate would put Quora ad’s USD per thousand views at 10 cents.
At a little less than half a million views, I would have made approximately $50.
I've made more money babysitting for a day than I would have made from my time here on Quora.

Paid answers would also promote click bait, which is already a problem on Quora.
The main purpose of Quora being to learn and exchange ideas, this whole significantly lower the quality, and thus the viewership.

So why do I write here?
Although I'm not paid, Quora gives me two main things.

For me, that's worth a lot more than $50.



I have been a top writer 3028 and never received a gift.
Nor would I expect one…
Quora has a partnership program that pays for asking questions.
But I am a member of that program, but I rarely ask questions.
I just tend to answer questions.

I would not say I answer questions because some goodness of my personality.
I just enjoy writing answers to interesting questions.
And the more I answer the more flaws I learn about my own thought processes, thus the better I understand.

BTW.
I do vaguely remember being offered a magazine subscription.
I just looked it up again in my mail.
What it is a link where they collect my e-mail address and name and then promise to send something in a few days.
But they never ask for a mailing address, so if they do send a welcome package, My message did not indicate they would send me swag.
Rather they would eventually open a store where I could buy swag.
[1]


Are some Quorans paid to write answers by Quora?
No.

Quarterly, Quora recognizes Top Writers with a badge on their profile page and a gift.

Quora Top Writers! Last year was Quora's best for getting helpful, relevant answers to questions many people have … The Quora Blog
Quora has formed partnerships that showcases and facilitates top writers' content to print and digital media publishers.

SOURCE: Top Writers program https://www.
quora.
com/topic/


Well, it is a mix of both.

The answer is no doubt out of my personal capacity and experience.

I have seen people answering question out of good faith and also for the want of making money & both are equally right.

Though some times, money might influence over answer written in good faith.

I have also seen quora users themselves asking question and then writing answers for making some money.

Having said all these, well, you can also make some money and save huge money.

All you need to do is search for klippd on your browser and just visit the how it works section to know more on HOW TO SAVE MONEY ON YOUR ONLINE SHOPPING
TO MAKE MONEY: visit the kuber section on klippd
Edits: I do work at klippd and yes, it has helped me save huge money on my online shopping and helped me make money on my blogging site.

The advantage is that even when you make Rs.
1, you can withdraw the same without any difficulties.

So, if you liked the answer, please do upvote and share klippd among your friends and help them save & make money.

With KLIPPD you will become a SMART SPENDER:)


Lolz.
.

Quora pays for answers so much so that the Top writers have planned to retire from their day jobs.
Top writers are so rich from writing they feel that there is no need to earn in the future except to write here.
Snob- I too wish I were a Top writer, but I'm not.

Seriously dude – Quora doesn't pay any money to anyone​ for any of their answers, not even the highly upvoted or highly the highly vowed answers.
In fact many get trolled for writing answers and it taxing to write than being benefited monetarily.

As Swami Vivekananda had said; when money is exchanged, one looses some and the other gains, but exchange knowledge makes both richer – not monetarily though.
People write only for the satisfaction of sharing knowledge.


Quora does not pay anyone to write answers.

But,there are companies and people who use quora as a way to get answers quicker.
And the incentive? Money.

This is called Knowledge prizes,and though this question is asking if Quora pays people to answer it,i feel like this is also worth mentioning.

Knowledge prizes are questions asked by the community to answer a question they have.
So far,very normal.

But they try to increase the number of answers received by giving them an incentive,dangling a carrot in front of the rabbit,so to speak.

They can offer money to people who provide the most useful answer,but only to that one person.
The rest are just……answers.

The incentive “helps” people write longer,more thought out,more….
detailed answers,in hopes of winning that prize.

So technically,Quora does not pay users.
People using Quora can.


#Does Quora pay users to answer questions Do people answer me with the goodness of their personality or because they get paid or both.
Tips and tricks to answer this question!
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By the end of 2017, I found a guy on the site: FreelanceWriter88.
Info.

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Wow, so he has built writing service online.
I love the way he builds his business.

And now I want to share some tips to help you become a successful freelance writer.

On top of being just a good writer, you will also need to master the business side of things as a freelance writer.
This includes everything from finding potential customers and successfully approaching them to closing the deal and providing them with an excellent experience before, during and after you delivered your work.
Make sure to pitch for new freelance writing gigs on a regular basis – if possible, try to make it a daily habit.
Too many freelance writers still miss the basics; set up a website and blog and make sure to become a guest author on some blogs in your niche in order to provide new potential customers with real life references.

If you ghostwrite for your customers, you won’t be able to provide potential new customers with references that include you as the author.
Being a guest blogger on a few industry blogs helps in these situations.

Related post: WritingTips365.
blogspot.
com/2017/09/24-tips-to-improve-your-writing-skills.
html
2.
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Getting the first client is perhaps the biggest challenge of any freelance writer.
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Now the problem or the good thing is… there is no definite way to find your first client.

The strategy used by the freelancer “A” may not work for freelancer “B” (even if he did it exactly like the freelancer “A”).

Start small but steady.

What you need is experience as you want to know more about the market, different types of clients, and what they’re looking for.

Your first client can be that friend on one of your social networks, or from a freelance marketplace, or from a job board, or someone who hired you when you pitched them the right way.
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html
3.
Develop a Marketing Plan
Okay.
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Having a solid marketing plan is what will help you stay in business.
Because after you land your first client, you still need to land another and another if you want to make this a sustainable business.

And to do that means you have to market yourself.
I’ve talked a lot about marketing (here & here).

The best tips I can give are:
• Start guest posting.
This gives you an author bio which helps gets you noticed
• Get on Twitter and LinkedIn
• Comment on blogs you want to write for
• Connect with businesses on social media
• Have a writer website
4.
Take Any Work You Can Get at Any Price:
Most new writers hate the fact that beginner work pays next to nothing.
Well, what do you expect for a job that everyone wants to do? Instead of being angry, reposition your thinking.
Because this low-paying (extremely low-paying) work exists, it’s easy for you to break into the business.
If it didn’t exist, you’d have to do an internship, get a degree, or do political favors for some developing nation just to get a crack at an online publication.
You never know who you’ll get connected to or where you work might end up.

5.
Start Your Own Blog
If you are just starting out, you’ll realize that everyone wants to see your published samples.
That’s why I advise you to start your own blog.
You can use it to publish pieces of content that you are really proud of and then use them as samples when you pitch clients.
In the long run, your blog (if managed well) can attract visitors, who, in turn, can become clients.
It is a win-win situation for you: you show your skills and gain more popularity.

6.
Learn Basic SEO
If you plan (or are already writing) content for the web, make sure you take the time to learn some basic Search Engine Optimization (SEO) skills.
I have seen the benefits of freelance writers possessing SEO knowledge from both the perspective of a client and as a freelance writer myself.
From a client’s standpoint, not needing to ask writers to fix very basic SEO considerations like headings, anchor text, and formatting is truly a relief.
You’d be surprised how many freelance writers profess to know SEO and still slip up on the fundamentals.
From my freelance writing experience, I find that clients are always impressed when I know exactly how to optimize a page both for SEO – which just shows how uncommon it still is!
7.
Sell Your Results, Not Your Writing
I think the most important thing for new freelance writers to understand is that you’re not selling writing.
Writing is your how, not your what.
You’re selling the difference your words make, usually in the context of helping a business make more money.
This is often a tough obstacle for new freelancers, but it is everything.
Mastering this idea usually indicates a critical shift in mindset from employee to business owner.
One telltale sign a writer hasn’t made this mental leap yet is a laser focus on job boards.
Job boards are fine, but if you’re only looking there, you’re still in a mindset of needing permission to work.
Freelancing is not about constantly applying for micro versions of a salaried position – it’s about creating solutions for people that are worth investing in.

8.
Specialize in a Niche
You may be creative and quite knowledgeable about many topics, but it pays to start out with a specific niche.
It helps you in building expertise in that niche and attract relevant clients.
It also helps you in building a portfolio of clients in that niche, which will be perceived as valuable by your other potential clients.

9.
Build Your Personal Brand
My tip for freelance writers would be to work on your personal brand.
Your social media covers, your website, and your blog should be relevant and great.
Also, consider pitching topics on writing great content to relevant publications, local chambers of commerce, online podcast shows, etc.
All of this enables you to be seen as an expert, authority, and thought-leader of your industry, and it gets you the social proof you need to earn potential clients’ trust.

10.
The basics: Editing and proofreading
Let’s start with a point you may already know but can’t be stressed enough.
Just because you are working with an editor doesn’t mean you don’t have to edit your own writing.
Just as you would when you didn’t have someone looking behind you on your writing, you should make sure to double-check your work.

While an editor is there to make sure you didn’t forget a comma or misplace your period, you need to remember there is more to their job than that.
If you take the extra time to make sure to get the basics down, you are saving an editor the time of having to rework those basics for you later.
Plus, in a professional capacity, editors will expect you to have made sure your writing is free of basic grammatical errors.


There are a few things in the world that people don't mind doing for free.
One of those things is writing here on Quora.

Though there is no payment involved, writing on Quora provides a lot of other benefits:


I am not a top writer Charlene, but have been quite prolific since I started on Quora around August time.
  I have been writing all my life.
  Journals and poems and articles, and stories etc.
  Unfortunately I wanted to become a journalist but there was just not the money for my education at that time, so it never came about.

However, I have utilised my writing skills in other areas through the years and got so much pleasure that I am just so pleased that I have this outlet.
  Since Quora came into my life I am even more excited, and have not only managed to get my thoughts and feelings out to the masses, I have also met so many interesting people through this forum.

Wow, truthfully I should be paying Quora.


Writing is bliss.

Writing here is bliss + entertainment.

It’s writing, but like a contact sport.
You get feedback, commentary, edits, upvotes, downvotes and messages.

It’s unburdening yourself of secrets.

It’s creating a community as a side effect.

It’s feeling supported by strangers like you.

It’s lending a hand.
Pulling someone up by telling them about how you pulled yourself up.

It’s waking up to one thousand resplendent people saying “thank you”.
(I mean this literally.
"Thank you" is a feature.
How beautiful is that?)
It’s never running out of things to write about.

Because, you come across a question like "how long does something remain new?"
It’s getting to explain to someone who is blind what it feels like to see.
This is not a metaphor.
It's one of my favorite questions.

Of course we get paid to answer questions.
Just not in the currency you think.


Does Quora pay users to answer questions? Do people answer me with the goodness of their personality or because they get paid, or both?


Currently, the only way to get “paid by Quora” is to work at Quora the company or own a piece of Quora the company.
There’s also a limited number of people in the Quora Partner Program who are paid for asking popular questions based on ad impressions.

Unfortunately, I'm going to bust a few myths and legends here, but hopefully this will clear up any confusion about making money through Quora:
So there you have it!
(All of these are “as far as I know” answers.
I would definitely appreciate any corrections or additions to this list in the comments.
)


In China, there is a tide of “knowledge economy”(paying for the knowledge) rising now.
Like the consultants, those who have the specific knowledge get paid through answering questions.
What’s different is that depending on the internet, one answer can be heard by many people.

Here are some platforms.
(I don’t know whether you can open it~)
值乎 – 说点儿有用的
在行 – 领先的知识技能共享平台
分答 – 付费语音问答
问达 – 申请方 | 大学生活经验分享_学习心得_留学申请_职业发展
As a matter of fact that it’s in a initial stage, there are plenty of either large or small platforms,some big, some small, some online, some offline; some comprehensive, some just include specific areas such as IT or studying abroad.

Let me set zhihu (www.
zhihu.
com/zhi
) as an example.

(the home page)
(my VPN doesn’t work now, i will use google to translate the page when it works)
You can pay to someone to inspire him or her to answer your questions, the price varies from 1 yuan to over 100 yuan (according to exchange rate now, 1 dollar=6.
88 yuan).
Also, everyone can “overhear” the answer for 1 yuan, no matter how much it takes the questioner, and the money is divided equally between the questioner and the respondent.

The average time of answering is less than 1 minute.

Steve Shi in the pictures, answering questions about psychology, got ¥13265( $1927)in total for his answering 235 questions, that is 56 yuan for a question.
And the following respondent, a product manager, can get more than ¥100 for a question.
In consideration of the price of commodity of China, it really matters.
(In average, ¥1 in China is nearly equal to $1 in the U.
S.
)
It’s noteworthy that this product was launched just in April this year, resulting in a bunch of followers.
Which one will be the unicorn is unknown, whereas the tide of getting paid for your knowledge may be unalterable.


I answer because I love to help people and I want to help people the way people that answe my questions have helped me.
I love interacting on the platform with answers and questions.

You have to give to receive.

I never ever respond in a brash judgemental condescending toxic manner because of ego, superiority complex or entitlement.

I question some of the grumpy or counterproductive essay style circling answers that lead no where but back to my question with additional answers :-(
I try to contribute as much as I can, but seeing toxic condescending answers to questions can really be discouraging.
I’m fairly new to Quora.
I have a very thick skin with social media; but some people in these answers take rudeness and extremely inappropriate responses attempted to be arranged elegantly in “top writer format”, malicious tactics to redirect traffic from certain pages editing is taken to a whole new level of disgust.
I never expected this app to be so contradictory and condescending in tone.

I expected a professional collegiate/graduate school/doctorate tone but maybe that’s too much to ask.

It’s so refreshing to see answers to my questions in a professional collegiate format void of any condescending /judgmental or outright rude tone.
Without plagierism as well.

Is that too much ask?
Plagiarism needs to be addressed because i sometimes notice answers that don’t make sense in tone or structure; but look like a template with extravagant vocabulary insertions.
An odd pattern.

If I don’t like a question I see I simply keep scrolling.
Why become triggered over a simple question on a screen that that doesn’t have my name on it specifically? No one is forcing anyone to answer anything.

If I ask a question myself then I’m needing a second or third opinion or an answer altogether.
I do not type to waste the world’s time.

Ethics and morals need to be integrated into one’s contribution to Quora to some degree.

A mad house at times hahaa! (Yes, I just used “hahaa and had fun with a joke”; I do it here and there to protect my energy; spread positivity.

Ashley


No.
That's all you need to know.

Having been an active Quora user before the Top Writers program was in place, I can say that the majority of top answerers do it because they love it.
It's funny, because in any real life situation, I'd be loath to expound as I do on Quora.
But on this site, readers can take or leave the answers, or opinions, and it's not really a dialogue anyway.

Top Writers receive a few perks.
Invites to parties (which are fully hosted and typically very nice, but you pay your way to Mountain View or New York).
Swag (clothing, books, t-shirts).
Sometimes, they publish your answers on sites like Slate and Huffington post, but that's unpaid.

It's not "goodness" that inspires users to contribute, I believe most are doing it for their own personal reasons.
Hell, the other day, a paid piece I'd written for a site (in beta) gained a whopping 213 views.
On Quora, some of my answers have had thousands of views, and my total views are almost at 5 million.

I like sharing on Quora.
If someone were to read my entire oeuvre (that's my fancy new word), they'd get more insight into me than pretty much any individual person I currently know in person, including my siblings and boyfriend of four years.
It's nice validation, that people actually value and care about what I have to say.

But compensation, not so much.
That's what my day job is for.


If they did, I'd feel more conflicted when I click "pass" on a question that doesn't grab my interest.
I'd spend a lot more time scanning and clicking in the "Questions for You" and "Most Wanted" categories on the Write page.
I'd probably, at times, churn out mediocre answers just to earn a bit of cash.
Also, Quora would get flooded by tons more people who would to that all the time, payouts would decrease towards zero, a lot of the people who truly love Quora now would probably leave, and the company would have an interesting PR fiasco in their hands.

Why bother paying people to do something they'll happily do for free?
I read on Quora to learn.
I comment on others' answers to discuss.
Sometimes those discussions turn to disagreements; all of which have been civil and polite in my experience.
I write on Quora to share what I know and think.
Some appreciate what they read.
Some take my invitation to continue the conversation in messages.
What you see on Quora is largely a group of intellectuals (of all kinds) coming together to exchange ideas.
It's done far better at keeping me engaged than any social network ever has.
Quora feels, to me, like one of my "homes" on the web.
I don't need payment to convince me to stick around.
I like it here.
:)


The payment for answering questions in Quora is not with money.
  There are many ways in which I have been paid for answering questions.
  One is that some of the questions spark thoughts that I wouldn't otherwise have had that can help to improve my life.

Another is that the questions I choose to answer are more often than not ones that help me to learn more about a subject because of the extra thought and research I put into the answer and also because some of the feedback is insightful.

Another payment is in the forms of the "thanks" I've gotten from the OPs and others who've read the answers.
  This gives me the feeling that I'm being helpful in a larger community, and if this improves the world to any degree, I benefit.
  I just happen to be living in this world.

Answering challenging questions exercises my brain in ways that just have to be useful for a person of my age (68).

Speaking of which, as a retired person, it's nice to have things to do to fill time in useful ways, and it's best when the time spent is entirely under my control.

Finally, something that I realized long after receiving the other benefits listed above, was, as someone who is writing a book that deals with opportunistic learning, answering questions gives me practice in writing, and my track record in views and up votes could possibly be a plus in getting an agent and a publisher if I ever get around to trying.

The really great thing about all these payments is that they relate to intrinsic motivation and connections with other people.
  For those of us who have enough money to get by already, this is far better currency than money could ever be.


Thanks for A2A.

Does Quora pay users to answer questions? Do people answer me with the goodness of their personality or because they get paid, or both?
I admit that, for some of the research that I do for certain answers, I wouldn’t mind getting paid for time and, yes, if some of us got paid on IQ points * number of answers we could give up our daytime jobs.

However, that I am not getting paid does not dissuade from sharing information that I already know.
People have finally learned to stop asking me for comparisons on a variety of laptops, simply because I now refuse to do the sort of searching that the person asking the question should be doing.
Yes, I’ll give an opinion based on my experience, but I’m not about to look up specifications for three different machines.

I have been pleasantly surprised by some of the questions routed my way that one would not normally expect (animals, optics, psychology etc.
) and, while I may not be an expert in these areas, I’m happy to provide an opinion based on what I do know.
Of course, there are some questions that can be answered validly in 100 different ways so opinions can then become valuable.

Also, there are some questions specifically directed toward me that I have to “pass” because the answer exceeds my current knowledge and, again, why am I searching on someone else’s behalf?
I enjoy answering questions that are intelligently put (even in bad English).
I have no objection when someone admits “idiocy” on a topic and is asking a really basic question.
Maybe the answers received help that person to nut out a larger more complex problem.

I have visited technical sites where people giving answers expect to be paid, and have found that the answers given are curt.
“It’s 2am at my end, and I want to know how to do this now, not be told I have to go and buy particular tools after the weekend, i.
e.
, please tell me how to achieve this with a bread knife instead of chasing down a spudger (a tool for cracking open snap-together cases).

That there is a sense of decorum and manners displayed on Quora, along with the ability to learn new things from other people’s answers, will always keep me coming back.

EDIT: 2016–07–05
I think if writers were to be paid for answering questions, such payment would have to rely on Upvotes, as direct payment would result in lower quality answers.




There’s Quora Knowledge Prize(s) where you get paid for a particular answer being considered particularly outstanding in a designated question that gets sponsored by third parties.

There’s also being part of the team that runs the official Quora account, who deliver answers about Quora policy as part of their job.
Perhaps some other members of the staff answer questions as part of their job, though I highly suspect this is done out of their own volition rather than doing it because they are required to do so (any confirmation of this hypothesis, Tatiana Estévez, Marc Bodnick, or Jonathan Brill?).

There’s organizational accounts which represent third party businesses and obviously someone within their staff gets paid to write their answers, but again this is not likely particularly high in their list of roles.
These employees are almost certainly social media managers who engage considerably more through more traditional platforms.

But OK, I guess the undertone of this question is “Can I get paid for answering questions on Quora if someone hires me to do so?”.
Perhaps, but don’t expect that gig to last for too long.
More likely than not, a company wanting to give that a try is seeing Quora as a promotional tool and the answers would quickly devolve into spam, which in turn would get you banned (again, Quora is not ideal for customer support nor engagement).

I mean, I guess it’s possible some organization could be smarter and get someone to answer questions properly and piggyback promotion onto that (say, the Centre Georges Pompidou paying someone to answer questions regarding artists whose work is at the museum housed within it), but honestly they’d more likely do such as thing as an event on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, etc.

Possible? Sure.
Likely? Definitely no.


Yes Quora pays me not exactly in terms of money but through other ways.

Quora Pays me by
   so you see I am getting paid indirectly.


The remarkable thing about Quora is that they don't charge us to participate.
 
Did you ever notice how freely people post extremely helpful websites? Years ago, when the web was first created, I wanted some lyrics from Disney songs.
  I was amazed to learn that someone had gone to the trouble of posting them, for free.
  It had been a lot of work.
Why did they bother?
I began to realize that the web offered a new venue for a natural human spirit of generosity, of sharing.
People love to help others.
It is a very deep instinct, and probably more responsible for our civilization than is generally recognized.
  We gain pleasure when we do it.

Wikipedia is also such a miracle.
It is amazing how good a job it does.
I grew up with the Encyclopedia Brittanica, and Wikipedia goes so far beyond it that it is amazing.
  Many people contribute to improving the Wikipedia web sites, just out of the pleasure they get in doing a good thing, in helping to create something so well-done.
Jimmy Wales should be given a Nobel Peace Prize.

Quora, in my mind, is the latest discovery of a method to extend this instinct to help others.
I am addicted.
If I have the right answer to a question, I really enjoy sharing it.
Unlike email, Quora shares the questions and answers with thousands of other people.
In fact, many people don't even realize that they have a question until they see someone else posting it.


I enjoy answering questions on Quora.

Plain and simple.

I have not been given any reward to do so nor is it a motivation to my response.

A little over ten years ago I was desperately bored and between careers, not just jobs, careers.
I was a poor typist and wanted to practice writing.
I found Yahoo Answers.
I responded to countless questions, it was a fun way to help two people out: myself and the person asking the question.

I never received anything more than that.
I often would get a glowing reply from the person on the other side and that was awesome for me.

The only drawback with YA was other members couldn't score my answer.
With Quora it's different.
In fact it's better, sometimes there are many angles to truth that must be considered.
When multiple responses are scored a simple favor becomes an enduring informational resource.

I'm going to wager that Quora has a future in solving the problems of knowledge, possibly AI.

I know Quora offers money for good questions but I'm not aware of money offered for answers.
I think this monetization would open up avenues of exploitation.
It is more difficult in my opinion to formulate a useful and unique question than a really good answer.


Here's another perspective:
I'm really, really glad Quora doesn't pay users to answer questions.

I read people like Alex Tabarrok and Richard Muller frequently, and chat with them occasionally.
I also answer questions, although never in as in-depth a way as they do, nor do I have the specific mastery of a particular subject that comes with a PhD and a lifetime of study.
I'm decently well educated and can speak intelligently on a number of topics, but I'm not a professor of anything.
(Yet?) In my favour, I do have a thing for one-liners.
I don't, however, have that expert appeal that garners thousands of followers.

I basically get to trade my answers, of whatever quality you consider them, for the answers of people who are experts in their field and who students (indirectly) regularly pay megabucks in tuition to have as undergrad-level teachers.

I'm winning this exchange.
I see no reason to interfere with it.


Well, I cannot put it better than Nick Kitchener, or in a less facetious vein, Dushka Zapata, but I suppose to some extent I also answer questions here because it is an opportunity to have a "reputation".
  I get most of my private business from referrals of people I already know in town, but nowadays people often turn to Google to look up more information about attorneys.

So I needed an "online presence".
  I got burned with an outfit that wanted to run a web-site for me—charged me an arm and a leg and it resulted in no additional business.
  Quora is not a marketing site, and I do not "market" on Quora (or anywhere, really), but still, now if someone Googles my name, they'll have something to find that tells them something about me, instead of a bland law office website.

It'd be nice if Quora would pay us, but considering it doesn't have any revenue, I think that would be an unsustainable business model.
  So I'll take my reward in satisfaction.

And of course I guess I kind of like to show off!


Nope!
I write here as a hobby.
I enjoy writing, people seem to like reading and it's interesting to see other people's views.

If I were to get paid, it would be from the ads in answers.
An overestimate would put Quora ad’s USD per thousand views at 10 cents.
At a little less than half a million views, I would have made approximately $50.
I've made more money babysitting for a day than I would have made from my time here on Quora.

Paid answers would also promote click bait, which is already a problem on Quora.
The main purpose of Quora being to learn and exchange ideas, this whole significantly lower the quality, and thus the viewership.

So why do I write here?
Although I'm not paid, Quora gives me two main things.

For me, that's worth a lot more than $50.



I have been a top writer 3028 and never received a gift.
Nor would I expect one…
Quora has a partnership program that pays for asking questions.
But I am a member of that program, but I rarely ask questions.
I just tend to answer questions.

I would not say I answer questions because some goodness of my personality.
I just enjoy writing answers to interesting questions.
And the more I answer the more flaws I learn about my own thought processes, thus the better I understand.

BTW.
I do vaguely remember being offered a magazine subscription.
I just looked it up again in my mail.
What it is a link where they collect my e-mail address and name and then promise to send something in a few days.
But they never ask for a mailing address, so if they do send a welcome package, My message did not indicate they would send me swag.
Rather they would eventually open a store where I could buy swag.
[1]


Are some Quorans paid to write answers by Quora?
No.

Quarterly, Quora recognizes Top Writers with a badge on their profile page and a gift.

Quora Top Writers! Last year was Quora's best for getting helpful, relevant answers to questions many people have … The Quora Blog
Quora has formed partnerships that showcases and facilitates top writers' content to print and digital media publishers.

SOURCE: Top Writers program https://www.
quora.
com/topic/


Lolz.
.

Quora pays for answers so much so that the Top writers have planned to retire from their day jobs.
Top writers are so rich from writing they feel that there is no need to earn in the future except to write here.
Snob- I too wish I were a Top writer, but I'm not.

Seriously dude – Quora doesn't pay any money to anyone​ for any of their answers, not even the highly upvoted or highly the highly vowed answers.
In fact many get trolled for writing answers and it taxing to write than being benefited monetarily.

As Swami Vivekananda had said; when money is exchanged, one looses some and the other gains, but exchange knowledge makes both richer – not monetarily though.
People write only for the satisfaction of sharing knowledge.


Well, it is a mix of both.

The answer is no doubt out of my personal capacity and experience.

I have seen people answering question out of good faith and also for the want of making money & both are equally right.

Though some times, money might influence over answer written in good faith.

I have also seen quora users themselves asking question and then writing answers for making some money.

Having said all these, well, you can also make some money and save huge money.

All you need to do is search for klippd on your browser and just visit the how it works section to know more on HOW TO SAVE MONEY ON YOUR ONLINE SHOPPING
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Edits: I do work at klippd and yes, it has helped me save huge money on my online shopping and helped me make money on my blogging site.

The advantage is that even when you make Rs.
1, you can withdraw the same without any difficulties.

So, if you liked the answer, please do upvote and share klippd among your friends and help them save & make money.

With KLIPPD you will become a SMART SPENDER:)

Updated: 18.06.2019 — 1:03 pm

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